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Milk intolerant: does heavy whipping cream have a bad effect on you?

by (70)
Updated about 5 hours ago
Created March 03, 2010 at 7:45 AM

Love dairy products and was previously drinking pints of milk per day until I realised that it was giving me terrible spots. Since going paleo my skin has cleared up massively which is great.

I have started using butter with no discernable problems and would like to add in heavy whipping cream too but am a little nervous about the results...don't want to go back to having skin like that. Anyone else who has had probs with dairy had any experience of adding cream back into their diet?

It's probably a case of just start slow and see how my body reacts, but a heads up from anyone with experience would be nice. Thanks, Tom.

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1418 · October 12, 2012 at 8:15 PM

lol "beat the shit out of it" ... its always satisfying to make your own butter

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24271 · September 11, 2011 at 6:47 PM

I think you should be fine with the cream however there is still some sugar left in cream (hence the carb counts.) Very minimal to be sure but it's still in there. Can you use coconut milk instead at least until you get the yeast under control?

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566 · March 14, 2011 at 5:50 AM

I've made additional observations during my tinkering the past few months and it seems butter and cream are not the cause. It appears to be a combination of sensitivity to airborne perfumes, hormones, and (maybe) the aforementioned fungus. I've upped coconut oil and started taking caprylic acid for the fungal infection. The other two issues are tougher.

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10768 · March 14, 2011 at 12:56 AM

I like your careful approach to your problems.

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566 · December 03, 2010 at 12:10 AM

Sorry for the late reply. I use Trader Joe's organic heavy cream: only ingredient is cream. The rash is back with a vengeance, so I'm still doing some tinkering: I'm thinking fungus might be a major issue rather than dairy.

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2633 · November 04, 2010 at 6:25 AM

I assume you are referring to where I say "Cream is about 50% fat and 50% milk"? I meant that as a rough approximation. In fact the very next sentence I clarify that the "milk" (pedantically, liquid) in cream is not regular milk. It's still white, so it's obviously more than water, but neither does it have all the sugar and protein of skim milk. We don't exactly have a word for the fluid part of cream, skim cream. I can say having drank it, it does have sugar. It's quite yummy in fact. Nutritionally, I have no idea what it is... white sugar water? Regards,

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20411 · November 01, 2010 at 1:02 PM

On my HWC label it says 50 cals per serving of which 50 cals are fat. How can it be 50% regular milk, wouldn't it have higher protein/sugar (lactose) calorie amounts?

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4124 · October 22, 2010 at 10:30 PM

Laura, are you using heavy whipping cream without additives in your elimination experiments? I am working on this one, too.

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22913 · September 06, 2010 at 12:26 AM

Pasturized or raw?

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6157 · March 03, 2010 at 5:07 PM

Absolutely. You can ask around and get a feel for what works for most people, but you won't know until you self-experiment. On another note, many lactose-intolerant people have reported a reduction or elimination of problems upon consuming grass-fed/raw dairy (including milk). I am heavily lactose-intolerant but I can drink a glass or two of raw milk, no problem.

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2633 · March 03, 2010 at 3:59 PM

Ultimately, you don't know until you try.

Having said that, it probably helps to understand what is happening to trigger an allergy. Allergies are a false-positive immunity response. Your immune system is attacking something it wrongly perceives as a foreign invader. Your immune system responds to proteins. Butter is almost entirely fat so people with milk allergies should have little problem with butter.

Cream is about 50% fat and 50% milk -- if you make your own butter from heavy cream you'll get 50% by weight butter and 50% by weight skim milk. Additionally, the milk in cream is not exactly regular milk. It is mostly water and the lighter milk solids. Roughly speaking, each cup of cream is like consuming a 1/4 cup of milk.

As for half and half, that is half cream and half regular milk. Roughly speaking, each cup of half and half is like consuming 5/8 cup milk.

Since allergies are a dose response, many people with mild milk allergies are fine with cream. While it's easy to swig down a cup of milk, cream being far richer is taken in smaller quantities plus has less protein per quantity.

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6157 · March 03, 2010 at 5:07 PM

Absolutely. You can ask around and get a feel for what works for most people, but you won't know until you self-experiment. On another note, many lactose-intolerant people have reported a reduction or elimination of problems upon consuming grass-fed/raw dairy (including milk). I am heavily lactose-intolerant but I can drink a glass or two of raw milk, no problem.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4
20411 · November 01, 2010 at 1:02 PM

On my HWC label it says 50 cals per serving of which 50 cals are fat. How can it be 50% regular milk, wouldn't it have higher protein/sugar (lactose) calorie amounts?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd
2633 · November 04, 2010 at 6:25 AM

I assume you are referring to where I say "Cream is about 50% fat and 50% milk"? I meant that as a rough approximation. In fact the very next sentence I clarify that the "milk" (pedantically, liquid) in cream is not regular milk. It's still white, so it's obviously more than water, but neither does it have all the sugar and protein of skim milk. We don't exactly have a word for the fluid part of cream, skim cream. I can say having drank it, it does have sugar. It's quite yummy in fact. Nutritionally, I have no idea what it is... white sugar water? Regards,

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112 · September 13, 2014 at 4:52 PM

The liquid portion of cream is buttermilk. When you use cream to make butter you are left with butter and buttermilk, it's different than skim milk.

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4124 · September 05, 2010 at 9:08 PM

This page on reactions to some dairy products might be of interest:

http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/gluten-and-casein-responders/

And here an excerpt from the page, "What am I reacting to?",

http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/quick-reference-what-am-i-reacting-to/

Milk and Yoghurt

Casein: opioid-like peptides (bioavailability is increased by lactobaccillus fermentation making yoghurt reactions worse than milk) Multiple immunological compounds (hormones, anti-microbial factors, immune development factors, tolerance/priming factors) Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) (particularly in rBGH-treated cows, IGF-1 is resistant to pasteurisation and bioavailability may be increased by pasteurisation, though IGF-1 is undetectable after heating to 121??C for 5 minutes, at which point the proteins become denatured)

Lactose (lower amounts in yoghurt, absent from sour tasting yoghurt)

Melatonin (a relatively harmless amine that aides sleep, particularly found in milk from cows milked before dawn)

Amines, particularly tyramine (trace amounts, usually yoghurt only)

? Lectins (trace amounts, from the cow's diet, lectin super-responders only)

? Salicylates and salicylate-like polyphenols (trace amounts, from the cow's diet, salicylate super-responders only)

? Arachidonic acid (super-responders only)

? Disinfectant used to wash out milk tanks (trace amounts, potassium iodide, chlorine and others, super-responders only)

? Calcium (excitatory, causes glutamate release, super-responders only)

Do you find milk addictive? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction. Does milk make you sneeze? If so, assume an intolerance to the immunological compounds and/or opioids. Does milk make you gain weight? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction and/or sensitivity to IGF. Does milk provoke seizures? If so, you may need to test your reaction to calcium.

For suspected opioid-like peptide responders, individuals should test A1 milk (regular cow's milk) versus A2 milk (Guernsey cow, goat's and sheep's milk). People who are intolerant of opioids usually tolerate A2 milk unless they are super-responders. See the gluten and casein responders page.

Cream and Butter

Casein: opioid-like peptides (trace amounts - super-responders only)

Insulin-like growth factor I (trace amounts - super-responders only)

? Carotinoids including beta carotene (super-responders only, particularly in Jersey and Guernsey cows)

Lactose (trace amounts)

? Arachidonic acid (super-responders only)

Hope these are of use.

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1137 · March 03, 2010 at 1:24 PM

I'm casein intolerant and heavy cream doesn't bother me.

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285 · March 03, 2010 at 4:22 PM

I eat butter a lot and drink whipping cream sometimes with a meal. I don't seem to have any problems. I would like to mention that if you ever thought of making your own butter, you start with whipping cream and basically beat the shite out of it. You end up with butter and buttermilk. If whipping cream gives you a problem and butter doesn't, then you'd just about have to narrow the problem down to buttermilk and it's components.

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1418 · October 12, 2012 at 8:15 PM

lol "beat the shit out of it" ... its always satisfying to make your own butter

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15583 · March 03, 2010 at 8:21 AM

I've been wondering the same thing, since I don't tolerate A1 casein well, but do have 100ml (2.6g lactose, 1.g protein) or so of cream per day. Cream certainly doesn't give me the same brain fog as a large dose of casein will, but impossible to tell whether or not it is still having an effect, just a very subtle one.

I think I might experiment with cutting out cream and relying on butter instead, since I've no idea how much casein/lactose is required to have an effect. Also cream is such a tempting food, and perhaps because it's liquid, it's easy to just drink even when you're not really hungry. I can't see myself having a slice of butter for fun, in the same way!

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2269 · June 01, 2010 at 1:00 AM

I'm lactose-intolerant -- even the vaunted raw grass-fed (and expensive!) milk has me cramping and scampering to the toilet within an hour -- but heavy cream doesn't affect me and neither does cheese, yogurt, butter. Just hold the milk, thanks.

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2319 · June 01, 2010 at 12:52 AM

I (mood and skin issues) can only handle ghee

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566 · May 31, 2010 at 7:05 PM

I've just gone back on heavy cream and whey protein after a month off all cow dairy except butter. Before the elimination experiment, I had a rash on my nose. With elimination, it went away, but now it's back. With what's been said above, I think I'll try eliminating the whey protein to see if there is a dose issue. Here's hoping.

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4124 · October 22, 2010 at 10:30 PM

Laura, are you using heavy whipping cream without additives in your elimination experiments? I am working on this one, too.

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
566 · December 03, 2010 at 12:10 AM

Sorry for the late reply. I use Trader Joe's organic heavy cream: only ingredient is cream. The rash is back with a vengeance, so I'm still doing some tinkering: I'm thinking fungus might be a major issue rather than dairy.

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
566 · March 14, 2011 at 5:50 AM

I've made additional observations during my tinkering the past few months and it seems butter and cream are not the cause. It appears to be a combination of sensitivity to airborne perfumes, hormones, and (maybe) the aforementioned fungus. I've upped coconut oil and started taking caprylic acid for the fungal infection. The other two issues are tougher.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded
10768 · March 14, 2011 at 12:56 AM

I like your careful approach to your problems.

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2004 · March 03, 2010 at 11:35 AM

Half and half will give me a runny nose if I drink too much of it, but not so with heavy cream. Oh, and, David, I have been know to have slices of butter for fun. Especially if it's chilled.

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10 · September 11, 2011 at 5:05 AM

I am trying to get rid of intestinal yeast, I just read that I can not have any dairy because of the "milk sugar" I only drink heavy cream, nothing else. Do I have to give up cream?

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24271 · September 11, 2011 at 6:47 PM

I think you should be fine with the cream however there is still some sugar left in cream (hence the carb counts.) Very minimal to be sure but it's still in there. Can you use coconut milk instead at least until you get the yeast under control?

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10768 · September 05, 2010 at 10:57 PM

Conventional heavy cream bothers me only a little (excess mucus/sleepyness) and organic heavy cream does not bother my in any amount. YUM!!!!!

Same thing for half and half, but magnified reaction for conventional, and little reaction for organic.

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15976 · June 01, 2010 at 12:29 AM

I can not drink milk. Runs, for sure. However, I eat butter daily. Cheese less so but I do have maybe 5-10 ounces per week I'd say. No probs. I don't ever eat straight cream but I do have a little bit of sour cream or creme freche everyday with no digestion issues at all. These are in pretty small amounts, though. Pretty much as a dip for romaine pieces, celery pieces etc. Start small. Always start small. Pretty much with anything.

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15 · September 13, 2014 at 6:24 PM

Heavy whipping cream contains almost no lactose so if lactose is the source of your problem you will not react to it.

Heavy whipping cream probably does contain trace amounts of some milk proteins, so potentially you could react to that.

I gave up heavy whipping cream because it made my LDL cholesterol shoot to astronomical levels.  Coconut milk does not have that same effect, so I gave up whipping cream and standardized on coconut milk.

The most purified dairy you can use would be Indian Ghee, which is a clarified form of butter that is almost pure fat and gets rid of almost all dairy proteins.   I use ghee extensively now and seem to do very well on it.

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0 · September 13, 2014 at 1:00 AM

Cannot eat anything with heavy cream or some frostings, causes stomach issues. Cannot eat cool whip, I break out in hives. But milk, sour cream, butter and cheese are not an issue. Any ideas of what's making my allergy? 

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0 · October 12, 2012 at 3:54 PM

I can eat plenty of butter.. (bulletproof coffee!! :D) but even a little cheese or milk and I pay for it..

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6709 · June 12, 2011 at 2:45 AM

Heavy Cream is as close to dairy as a flank steak is.

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20908 · June 12, 2011 at 12:37 AM

Milk and cheese make me quite sick. But I have no problems at all with butter or heavy cream lattes.

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0 · June 11, 2011 at 4:43 PM

Hi: You may know this, but carageenan is allergenic to many people, as well as liver toxic. I cannot touch the stuff--it gives me the runs. I used to think I was lactose intolerent until I figured this out. Read up on carageenan. It is probably something none of us should be consuming.

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1303 · March 14, 2011 at 2:04 AM

I'm severely lactose intolerant on conventional milk, but I do just fine on raw and VAT pasteurized milk (both are grassfed- no idea if that makes a difference). I thought that I could do conventional heavy cream because of the lowered lactose, but I can't. Granted, my source is ultra-pasteurized, and has carageenan added to it, but the reaction is still there. I'm perfectly fine, though, with Seven Stars heavy whipping cream. I don't know if it's VAT pasteurized or not, but it doesn't have any additives. So, even if you have a bad reaction the first time, you may want to seek out different brands to experiment with.

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588 · May 31, 2010 at 10:34 PM

I cannot tolerate dairy and avoid it completely though I dream of my favorite hard cheeses from time to time ...

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