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Eating Bones?

by (787)
Updated about 16 hours ago
Created April 08, 2014 at 5:48 PM

I have a few questions regarding broth, particularly the bones, mainly - is there any reason i shouldn't be eating soft bones from broth? They must be packed full of bio-available calcium right?

They are so damn tasty, rich, creamy, soft and satisfying, and as they are so rich once i've had enough its easy to tell

I was also wondering if instead of chowing down on the bones i could just keep on cooking the broth and eventually they will dissolve into the broth?

And last question - do you eat the meat that cooks off the bones after 48-72 hours cooking? Is there reason not to? I usually blend it into a soup along with any undissolved gelantinous bits, but the meat does look kinda abused for lack of a better word, like maybe the goodness is in the broth & it's not worth eating? Im sure grok wouldn't have wasted it but maybe i would be better off chucking it and eating some sardines & egg yolks instead.

Thanks in advance for any answers

ps search function isn't working right now, so i'm well within my rights to ask these undoubtedly already asked questions ;p

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622 · April 08, 2014 at 7:12 PM

Go for it, trust me it's worth a try, you'll save so much time, those things are amazing, they will humble any chunk of food you put in there, no matter how tough. You'll save on electricity also since you'll only use it for less than 2 hours.

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 7:09 PM

I usually just put a load of bones in the slow cooker/crockpot set on low, first batch @ 24 hours gives me the gelatinous jelly broth, the second batch at 48 hours gives me the soft edible bones. I do have a never used pressure cooker though, i'll give it a whirl ;)

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 6:48 PM

I often wonder if i should eat/drink the fat on top of the broth, sometimes my gut says chuck it but sometimes i leave it in as it makes a cup of broth taste so much better, as does adding generous sea salt! I guess with the bones that moderation is best and they're so satiating that shouldn't be a problem.

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 6:28 PM

I eat sardines a few times per week and love it when the spinal cord is intact, kinda gross but i love it as i know i'm getting a good dose of calcium. The bones from ruminant broth are great after 48 hours cooking too, they can even be blended into a soup which makes it so smooth & creamy. I remember you asking this very question about a year ago but couldn't find it, thanks for chiming in. I'm guessing magnesium levels may play a part as well to make sure all that calcium is used correctly

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4 Answers

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0 · April 18, 2014 at 7:52 PM

I have made bone broth many times before and LOVE it. But I use the slow cook version (at least 8 hours). It is recommend low simmer, slow boil to do this. I've heard others say to do it in 1-2 hours in a pressure cooker. Does anyone know (besides obviously the time saver) what, if any nutritional difference there may be?

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622 · April 08, 2014 at 6:50 PM

Use a pressure cooker so you don't have to cook it for so long. That seems like a pretty big wait 48-72 hours? Wow. With a pressure cooker, you could probably cut that time down by a lot, probably down to 1 or 2 hours at most.

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 7:09 PM

I usually just put a load of bones in the slow cooker/crockpot set on low, first batch @ 24 hours gives me the gelatinous jelly broth, the second batch at 48 hours gives me the soft edible bones. I do have a never used pressure cooker though, i'll give it a whirl ;)

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2944 · April 08, 2014 at 6:26 PM

When I make stock it's a rolling broth for a few days, made from beef and pork bones previously roasted and eaten... (mmmm..) The meat which there's really not that much of I discard - i eat meat before, or it cooking spare ribs or brisket or something it's taken out when tender. I don't eat the leftover bits because probably the fat is oxidised, while ht meat taste's a bit unpleasant to me. the bones though I often eat, though not all... I've researched a bit and from what I can see there are some risks associating with eating them - for the same reasons that bonemeal usually isn't recommended (prion diseases). However these do not prevent me eating some sometimes.. When I was tending towards eating a higher fat diet in general they were good to use in reasonable amounts - like you I found/find them very satiating... There is some fair fat in them..., and water...

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 6:48 PM

I often wonder if i should eat/drink the fat on top of the broth, sometimes my gut says chuck it but sometimes i leave it in as it makes a cup of broth taste so much better, as does adding generous sea salt! I guess with the bones that moderation is best and they're so satiating that shouldn't be a problem.

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10994 · April 08, 2014 at 6:10 PM

Bones are a great source of what is probably the best and most bio-available form of calcium available,this form of calcium is called Calcium Hydroxyapatite. I've done a ton of research on toxicity and it just doesn't seem much more toxic than regular meat from what I've seen. I eat sardine bones occasionally for this very reason. I once ate them for a week leading into a dentists appointment when I was SURE I must have a cavity. By the time I got to the dentist it wasn't hurting anymore and x-ray showed normal. So, who knows?

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787 · April 08, 2014 at 6:28 PM

I eat sardines a few times per week and love it when the spinal cord is intact, kinda gross but i love it as i know i'm getting a good dose of calcium. The bones from ruminant broth are great after 48 hours cooking too, they can even be blended into a soup which makes it so smooth & creamy. I remember you asking this very question about a year ago but couldn't find it, thanks for chiming in. I'm guessing magnesium levels may play a part as well to make sure all that calcium is used correctly

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