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Histamine intolerance - what do you eat?

by (3850)
Updated about 21 hours ago
Created February 22, 2012 at 3:48 AM

So I have been doing a lot of research into histamine intolerance. There are many food items on the "high-histamine" food list that I know I react to and avoid, but I never associated them with histamines before. What really drew my attention was my long-known (but never understood) indigestion after eating slow-cooked or pressure-cooked meats. I have been making gelatin-rich bone broth by cooking lamb and beef shanks in my pressure cooker. It tastes amazing and leaves me with several meals of meat and broth. But despite cooking totally clean, I was having reactions that I did not have when I ate lamb or beef steak.

So understanding the relationship between long-cooked or leftover meat and histamine explains a lot. However, this leaves me with a problem. I gave up bread and nuts a long time ago. I had no issue removing citrus fruit and tomatoes and smoked meats when I felt they were causing me problems. But now I'm looking at removing not only a large component of my diet, but one that was supposed to be helping me. Not to mention my only means of making meals in advance. I can't exactly fry a steak in the lunchroom at work.

So is anyone else trying to navigate the world of histamine intolerance? How do you do it? How do you get gelatin and broth into your diet if you can't eat slow-cooked meat protein? What the heck do you eat when you can't cook fresh meat? I have to admit this has me pretty bummed.

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2319 · July 04, 2014 at 8:17 PM

thank you! Very helpful research. I think this is the missing link for my caveman spouse.

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 6:26 PM

I thought fish (salmon in particular) were really really high in histamine (as is kale). Glad you're able to tolerate it. I wonder if you cut out the highest histamine foods if the freezing wouldn't be as necessary.

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 5:50 PM

if you don't know your genetic MTHFR status, you should be taking methyl-b12 (the form which is already ready-to-go and does not need to be converted into its usable form). Mike

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134 · September 09, 2013 at 6:50 AM

its def the eggs

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145 · May 14, 2013 at 2:50 AM

I had never heard of histamine intolerance. Just with a quick internet search, it looks very similar to a yeast-free or candida diet that I follow for my yeast allergy. I don't know if that helps, but it seems like there is more information on the internet for the candida diet than low-histamine diet. http://www.livestrong.com/candida-diet-food-list/

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2437 · March 06, 2013 at 4:01 AM

Did you also give up white rice and corn? I allow both once and awhile

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7275 · October 16, 2012 at 6:16 PM

This makes a lot of sense, especially since Kelly's reporting fatigue, brain fog, and headaches. That makes me suspicious of B12/B9 deficiency.

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1571 · May 24, 2012 at 5:52 PM

I really love her blog. It is so well written and inspiring. +1.

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:44 AM

Cold exposure definitely rises my histamine level. I get very hitchy..

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Damn it I meant whites! Yolks are fine! Sorry English isn't my first language :-s

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:41 AM

I still eat them but always cooked. I think their histamine level is quite low when cooked actually...

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20353 · May 11, 2012 at 4:59 PM

Good to know Roberto!!!

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580 · May 11, 2012 at 3:06 PM

egg yolks are bad if you are histamine intolerant

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156 · March 07, 2012 at 2:47 PM

I haven't seen any results with a lower-histamine diet, vitamin C, or quercetin so far either. I have gotten some significant reduction in severity and duration of flushing from the beta blocker I'm taking (propranolol), but it's a blunt instrument and probably not the best thing to be taking healthwise. My doctor was convinced I had lupus for a while, but all the ~8 tests I got for inflammatory and autoimmune markers have been normal.

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1198 · March 06, 2012 at 10:00 PM

Mine's been disappointing as well. Eating lamb, liver, a few vegetables, and winter squash/sweet potatoes for carbs, no-filler probiotic. Still waking up horribly water retentive, flushing, red nose, glassy eyes. Seems that a week of eating such a hypo-allergenic low-histamine diet would show at least some improvement if this were in fact related to histamine.

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3850 · March 06, 2012 at 2:37 AM

I've been easing my way into it, eating mostly fresh-cooked meat and fish. Also rice and some very well-cooked vegetables. Honestly, I've felt awful. Headaches, brain fog, complete fatigue. Something is happening and its either very good or very bad, I'm not sure. I got the GAPS book and the author was pretty adamant that avoiding allergenic foods shouldn't be necessary as you heal. I haven't started any additional supplements yet, so I'll see if they help.

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1198 · March 05, 2012 at 8:25 PM

Kelly, it's been almost two weeks, how is your minimal-histamine GAPS thing going? I don't expect you to have healed your gut, but are you noticing less sypmtoms? Have SAM-e or any other supplements helped you? I tried quercetin and got the worst histamine reaction yet. Could have been fillers?

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 2:50 PM

I've been eating lower carb for most of the last decade, so I know I actually do well on that plan. And I tend to get sleepy/brain fog more than excited. I can live with a restricted diet, as long as I have a good routine in place (which is going to take some adjustment). I'm fine with my CSA beef, except that the share half pork and sausages and bacon, which I don't want to eat for now. I'm going to need to find more beef and lamb to supplement.

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20353 · February 28, 2012 at 6:43 AM

For me it is any/all forms of coconut.

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20353 · February 28, 2012 at 6:43 AM

For me it is any coconut...

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 6:18 AM

Also, another thing I've experienced and found anecdotal support for on the forums is histamine's affect of mood, as in rising histamine = excited and almost manic mood while abrupt elimination of histamine = depression. This effect, the lower carbs of the GAPS diet, the restrictiveness of it, impatience, and dealing with this whole daunting task was causing me to get seriously mopey in fun new ways, thus my answer above. I don't know how other people are able to go on restrictive or therapeutic diets for 6 months...

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 6:00 AM

Kelly, I don't know if you should stress out about aged meat and all that for now. After pouring over a lot of HIT forums, it seems that everyone has a different threshold, and many do OK with fresh/frozen meat. I would try limiting every other source of histamine, keep your CSA meat, but use your shorter cooking method.

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 4:38 AM

Also, I have a freezer full of bone broth :( but I think to start I'm going to boil meats just until cooked and drink the boiling liquid as "broth". Now to figure out where I'm going to find fresh enough meat and room in my freezer to keep it.

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 4:35 AM

SOL - You have summed up my feelings perfectly. My plan now is to start a GAPS-type diet, following close to GAPS but minimizing my histamine intake as much as possible. I believe in fermented foods, but I may stick with probiotics for a while until I heal. I've been taking a lot of extra C and haven't noticed a lot of effect, but I plan to keep using it with SAM-E and some Histame when symptoms warrant. I'm not thrilled, but I am determined to push through and hopefully heal.

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 3:51 AM

I'm going to give Quercetin a shot.

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 3:50 AM

Yeah, I have to draw a line on what to worry about. I know Dragonfly uses vitamin C as an antihistamine after borderline meals with success.

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467 · February 28, 2012 at 12:32 AM

The problem wouldn't be vitamin C itself, but the way they make it. Although I just read (the link that sallycinnamon posted) that citrus fruits have an histamine liberating effect, so one less natural source of vit C for me. :(

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1198 · February 27, 2012 at 11:26 PM

Someone with a histamine sensitivity reacting to a natural anti-histamine? Well this fits nicely with all the other dead-ends. I'm not keen on vit C anyways, it's not helping as an anti-histamine and it's a pain to take.

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:18 PM

I just looked at the link I sent and didn't see ascorbic acid on the list, but as far as I know it is made the same way as citric acid, via fermentation. At least I can react to both. Natural citric and ascorbic acid from fruit of course, would not be a problem.

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:13 PM

OMG! You totally described my frustrations too! I react to so many things I thought of just not eating anymore! Btw, you could be reacting to the pure ascorbic acid, especially if you react to MSG. I simply avboid all processed foods and even suplements because of: http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources_printable.pdf

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:02 PM

Would coconut oil be a problem too? I think I'm on the same boat.

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3850 · February 27, 2012 at 9:49 PM

Everything from the slate of GI issues to hives and sniffling/sneezing/watery eyes. I also have been getting an itchy throat with a ton of mucus lately (lots of mucus, infrequent itching of the throat/ears). Most recent have been episodes of fatigue and some transient lightheadedness.

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1198 · February 27, 2012 at 9:04 PM

What kind of reactions do you have?

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8933 · February 25, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Calcium is good when you're histamine intolerant. Ray Peat advocates Masai calcium intakes : 5-7g a day.

957a563c7e4a165663fd3c71207c39da
659 · February 25, 2012 at 11:01 AM

You may also want to read this site (great title huh) and then read up on DAO enzyme which is activated by B6. http://thepowerofpoo.blogspot.com.au/2011/07/demon-within.html If you have a dysfunction in that enzyme you may have an explanation for the amine intolerance. The author mentions SAMe and Vitamin B - these are commonly used supplements to support the methylation cycle.

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1198 · February 24, 2012 at 2:10 AM

Melissa, what symptoms did you have when histamine intolerant? I suspect it too, but I have no digestive symptoms at all, which seem to be pretty common.

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3850 · February 23, 2012 at 10:38 PM

Keli, can you provide any information on the cold exposure? From everything I've read it seems that cold exposure raises histamine levels. I would love to know more about what you're trying.

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3850 · February 23, 2012 at 6:13 PM

Thanks for that link. I admit it kind of blows my mind trying to think about how I can do this. I live in a city and have been getting almost all of my meat frozen from grass-fed farms. I'm sure my CSA is not aging the meat much, if at all, but I have to assume it's been frozen for up to a month before I get it. There are a few local butcher shops, but none that routinely sell grass-fed meat. And 99% of the meat from the orgainc market is vacuum packed (and most is frozen). At this point, I may have to give up grass-fed to get fresh.

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4124 · February 23, 2012 at 4:18 PM

Here is the page on reducing amines at the blog on the FailSafe diet. Maybe there is something there that will be helpful: http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/minimising-amine-formation-in-meat-dairy-and-eggs/

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4124 · February 23, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Kelly, I'm sorry the histamines hit so hard. It is a challenge to get the problem foods out and to find foods one can eat without trouble. Have you got access to freshly slaughtered meat?

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:59 PM

Also, I actually had been eating the two meal a day way for the last few months. I only gave it up because I tended to feel awful after dinner. I thought it was just eating too much at once, but now it appears that it might be what I was eating (lots of pre-made slow cooker fare).

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:56 PM

Thanks for the help. I am feeling more positive today. It just was discouraging that getting gluten out of my diet, while it helped me in a lot of ways, actually left me feeling worse in other ways. I think a lot of that resulted from me increasing my reliance on some histamine-heavy foods because I knew they were "safe". I'll do what it takes to get them out of my diet, it's just a bummer to have to revamp my entire diet AGAIN, when I had finally gotten into a good routine.

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:52 PM

I was wondering about Histame, if only as a temprorary help with reducing the histamine-related irritation of my gut lining. Have you noticed positive effects from taking it?

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4124 · February 22, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Kelly, I wish I knew enough to offer some help. I wish you success in getting food you can eat. Jamie Scott might be able to help. Here is his blog: http://thatpaleoguy.com/

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56616 · February 22, 2012 at 3:25 PM

raw because it avoids any potentially irritating compounds formed during cooking.

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1026 · February 22, 2012 at 7:52 AM

I love raw meat, but I don't wanna overdo on protein...

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1026 · February 22, 2012 at 7:48 AM

Great! I wonder why you did it raw? I don't eat green leafy veggies anymore (only cilantro) and find I do great with only fruit and meat and gelatin and coconut oil...

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56616 · February 22, 2012 at 6:34 AM

well, histimine intolerance is its own issue and you kind of have to set aside some other ideals if you have it. For example, fermented food is very healthy, but not at all when you are dealing with this issue. Juicing can be kind of unhealthy for many people, but with histimine intolerance it can help you get a lot of nutrients without irritating your stomach. Frozen food is usually not as good as fresh food, but with HI it can be a better choice since mold/bacterial growth is stemmed by freezing. The whole thing you have to do is eat a very clean very delicate diet until your body heals.

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:03 AM

Thanks Melissa. This is a pretty new revelation to me so I haven't really started experimenting yet. I have in the past consumed a lot of purified gelatin, when I was too sick to each much else, but I believed it was moue nutritious to eat it as part of a whole food. But obviously I'm not helping my inflamed digestive tract this way. I would appreciate any other helpful ideas from your gut-healing days as from reading your blog it looks like we have/had a lot of similar issues.

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9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad
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56616 · February 22, 2012 at 3:51 AM

I used to be histamine intolerant, but it seems like after I healed my gut it totally went away and now I pretty much eat anything. If you can't tolerant homemade broth, have you tried just purified gelatin like the Great Lake organic stuff? There is probably something in the homemade stuff that is irritating your inflamed digestive tract.

I ate a lot of raw meat when I was on this diet. And raw fish. Raw fruit. Six months later I started adding in "normal" foods and I've been fine ever since.

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:03 AM

Thanks Melissa. This is a pretty new revelation to me so I haven't really started experimenting yet. I have in the past consumed a lot of purified gelatin, when I was too sick to each much else, but I believed it was moue nutritious to eat it as part of a whole food. But obviously I'm not helping my inflamed digestive tract this way. I would appreciate any other helpful ideas from your gut-healing days as from reading your blog it looks like we have/had a lot of similar issues.

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1026 · February 22, 2012 at 7:48 AM

Great! I wonder why you did it raw? I don't eat green leafy veggies anymore (only cilantro) and find I do great with only fruit and meat and gelatin and coconut oil...

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad
56616 · February 22, 2012 at 3:25 PM

raw because it avoids any potentially irritating compounds formed during cooking.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac
1026 · February 22, 2012 at 7:52 AM

I love raw meat, but I don't wanna overdo on protein...

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad
56616 · February 22, 2012 at 6:34 AM

well, histimine intolerance is its own issue and you kind of have to set aside some other ideals if you have it. For example, fermented food is very healthy, but not at all when you are dealing with this issue. Juicing can be kind of unhealthy for many people, but with histimine intolerance it can help you get a lot of nutrients without irritating your stomach. Frozen food is usually not as good as fresh food, but with HI it can be a better choice since mold/bacterial growth is stemmed by freezing. The whole thing you have to do is eat a very clean very delicate diet until your body heals.

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1198 · February 24, 2012 at 2:10 AM

Melissa, what symptoms did you have when histamine intolerant? I suspect it too, but I have no digestive symptoms at all, which seem to be pretty common.

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8933 · February 25, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Calcium is good when you're histamine intolerant. Ray Peat advocates Masai calcium intakes : 5-7g a day.

best answer

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1198 · February 27, 2012 at 10:03 PM

I've been suspecting Histamine Intolerance for about a year, and I completely identify with your frustration. How can such a catch-22 exist? I went on a pretty restrictive diet as an experiment with acne, but got all these new things like flushing and a puffy face and swollen hands, as I was eating a lot of mackerel, kimchi, spinach, leftover meat etc. If indeed HIT is the case, then it's like being banished from Paleoland, and of course I've already exiled myself from every other diet. No fish or shellfish? No histamine-rich beef liver? No pork, no bacon, and even no beloved ruminant if it's been aged (i.e. most grass fed beef) or left in the fridge overnight? No sauerkraut, fermented cod liver oil, kefir? No high-intensity exercise? A messy mix of plagiarized or conflicting lists of acceptable foods? Hardly any information on the internet? Optimal paleo seems like a damn cake walk compared to this.

The only possible cure I'v seen is healing the gut, as Melissa mentioned, which is hard enough, but now I have to navigate throught a gut-healing protocol without fermented food or broth? An intolerance to it's own remedy? It's like some cruel joke!

For the past week I've been doing just that, a intro-style GAPS diet of gently cooked beef/lamb and squash/vegetables in broth, raw egg yolks, along with a high-quality powdered probiotic. Also l-glutamine, pure ascorbic acid, and magnesium. I'm still having daily symptoms. Could it be the broth? The aged grass-fed meat I bought frozen from a local farm? Maybe I don't even have this? Makes me want to move to Montana and just sneeze into my ice cream for the rest of my days!

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:13 PM

OMG! You totally described my frustrations too! I react to so many things I thought of just not eating anymore! Btw, you could be reacting to the pure ascorbic acid, especially if you react to MSG. I simply avboid all processed foods and even suplements because of: http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources_printable.pdf

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 6:18 AM

Also, another thing I've experienced and found anecdotal support for on the forums is histamine's affect of mood, as in rising histamine = excited and almost manic mood while abrupt elimination of histamine = depression. This effect, the lower carbs of the GAPS diet, the restrictiveness of it, impatience, and dealing with this whole daunting task was causing me to get seriously mopey in fun new ways, thus my answer above. I don't know how other people are able to go on restrictive or therapeutic diets for 6 months...

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 4:38 AM

Also, I have a freezer full of bone broth :( but I think to start I'm going to boil meats just until cooked and drink the boiling liquid as "broth". Now to figure out where I'm going to find fresh enough meat and room in my freezer to keep it.

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:18 PM

I just looked at the link I sent and didn't see ascorbic acid on the list, but as far as I know it is made the same way as citric acid, via fermentation. At least I can react to both. Natural citric and ascorbic acid from fruit of course, would not be a problem.

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1198 · February 27, 2012 at 11:26 PM

Someone with a histamine sensitivity reacting to a natural anti-histamine? Well this fits nicely with all the other dead-ends. I'm not keen on vit C anyways, it's not helping as an anti-histamine and it's a pain to take.

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 4:35 AM

SOL - You have summed up my feelings perfectly. My plan now is to start a GAPS-type diet, following close to GAPS but minimizing my histamine intake as much as possible. I believe in fermented foods, but I may stick with probiotics for a while until I heal. I've been taking a lot of extra C and haven't noticed a lot of effect, but I plan to keep using it with SAM-E and some Histame when symptoms warrant. I'm not thrilled, but I am determined to push through and hopefully heal.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1
467 · February 28, 2012 at 12:32 AM

The problem wouldn't be vitamin C itself, but the way they make it. Although I just read (the link that sallycinnamon posted) that citrus fruits have an histamine liberating effect, so one less natural source of vit C for me. :(

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 6:00 AM

Kelly, I don't know if you should stress out about aged meat and all that for now. After pouring over a lot of HIT forums, it seems that everyone has a different threshold, and many do OK with fresh/frozen meat. I would try limiting every other source of histamine, keep your CSA meat, but use your shorter cooking method.

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 3:50 AM

Yeah, I have to draw a line on what to worry about. I know Dragonfly uses vitamin C as an antihistamine after borderline meals with success.

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3850 · February 28, 2012 at 2:50 PM

I've been eating lower carb for most of the last decade, so I know I actually do well on that plan. And I tend to get sleepy/brain fog more than excited. I can live with a restricted diet, as long as I have a good routine in place (which is going to take some adjustment). I'm fine with my CSA beef, except that the share half pork and sausages and bacon, which I don't want to eat for now. I'm going to need to find more beef and lamb to supplement.

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134 · September 09, 2013 at 6:50 AM

its def the eggs

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659 · February 25, 2012 at 10:46 AM

Hi there

If your body is producing excess histamine, that indicates you are an undermethylator - your body is unable to process the histamine. Methylation is a body-wide process that goes on continually and there are many sub-cycles within methylation. If there is a problem at any point in one of those cycles, the whole cycle is thrown off causing potentially many different kinds of problems - food intolerance, mental health issues, hives for example. An undermethylator doesn't have enough methyl groups for a required reaction in the body to take place, leading to dysfunction.

I suggest doing some research on people that have treated their undermethylation and resolved the amine issue. I am an undermethylator myself yet I don't seem to have a problem with amines in food.

Methylation treatment goes hand in hand with the Failsafe diet already mentioned and gut problems are always implicated in food intolerances.

It can be tricky to find a doctor savvy treating this sort of thing but they do exist. I'm on a Facebook group of people dealing with similar problems to yours. Let me know if you're interested in more info.

Best wishes :)

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659 · February 25, 2012 at 11:01 AM

You may also want to read this site (great title huh) and then read up on DAO enzyme which is activated by B6. http://thepowerofpoo.blogspot.com.au/2011/07/demon-within.html If you have a dysfunction in that enzyme you may have an explanation for the amine intolerance. The author mentions SAMe and Vitamin B - these are commonly used supplements to support the methylation cycle.

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1571 · May 24, 2012 at 5:52 PM

I really love her blog. It is so well written and inspiring. +1.

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7275 · October 16, 2012 at 6:16 PM

This makes a lot of sense, especially since Kelly's reporting fatigue, brain fog, and headaches. That makes me suspicious of B12/B9 deficiency.

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118 · February 27, 2012 at 11:15 PM

I used to have a BIG problem with Histamine response thinking, (brainwashed by the med comm), it was grasses, pollen, etc, and finally learned/realized it was food/gut related. Giving up dairy, (10 yrs ago), refined sugars, grains, beans, not long after, it went away...completely...as did all allergies. I will tell you, beyond the food, Quercitin, 1000mg/day, seemed to re-boot my system, as I can have anyone of those foods as a treat with no response. -Billy

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1198 · February 28, 2012 at 3:51 AM

I'm going to give Quercetin a shot.

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2437 · March 06, 2013 at 4:01 AM

Did you also give up white rice and corn? I allow both once and awhile

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176 · July 22, 2012 at 9:36 AM

An old thread, I do have something to add worthy of bringing it up again.

DAO is the histamine scavenging enzyme, and is believed to be more important than the methylation enzyme that degrades histamine. DAO is a copper containing enzyme, if you are deficient in copper therefore you might experience histamine intolerance.

Here comes the important bit, copper enzymes are also used to keep excess iron in check and prevent it from catalyzing all sorts of oxidation reactions. If you have an iron level that is too high a lot of your copper reserve is going to be put towards those enzymes lowering your DAO level, and potentially inducing histamine intolerance.

For myself, just 50mg of supplemental iron is enough to bring on histamine intolerance.

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30 · February 25, 2012 at 10:03 AM

Hello!

I am histamine intolerant since a couple of month. At least I know what I have since a couple of month :-) I found this website very informative: http://www.food-intolerance-network.com/food-intolerance/histamine-intolerance.html

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20353 · February 22, 2012 at 7:17 AM

I have a very limited diet due to food alergies and Paleo. It still works.

No nuts, coconut, chocolate.

I cook meat and bring it to work every day without soup. Just cook up extra and place it in the freezer. I also bring egg yolks or potatoes pre-cooked.

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20353 · February 28, 2012 at 6:43 AM

For me it is any coconut...

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20353 · February 28, 2012 at 6:43 AM

For me it is any/all forms of coconut.

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467 · February 27, 2012 at 11:02 PM

Would coconut oil be a problem too? I think I'm on the same boat.

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580 · May 11, 2012 at 3:06 PM

egg yolks are bad if you are histamine intolerant

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20353 · May 11, 2012 at 4:59 PM

Good to know Roberto!!!

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Damn it I meant whites! Yolks are fine! Sorry English isn't my first language :-s

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:41 AM

I still eat them but always cooked. I think their histamine level is quite low when cooked actually...

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10 · August 22, 2013 at 3:57 AM

I haven't done enough research yet, but I've found (I think) a link between histamine intolerance and B12 deficiency. If you are gluten intolerant (as I am) and your gut is damaged, then you can get HIT and/or B12 deficiency from that. However, you can be B12 deficient for a dozen different reasons, including the gluten thing, low stomach acid etc. Today I found some info that stated that the body requires B12 for methylation and there is (perhaps)? a link between low methylation and histamine intolerance? I am B12 deficient...have been struggling to convince the medicos for a few years, am also gluten intolerant, have HIT, fructose malabsorption and salicylate sensitivity. There are other digestive issues but that's enough for now! I have recently started on 1000mcg of sublingual B12 daily and am waiting to see if there is an improvement in my HIT symptoms. I don't want to get too excited because I've been down that road so many times before, but I thought I'd put this info in here in case it helps somebody else and I'll report back if my HIT symptoms improve with taking B12.

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 5:50 PM

if you don't know your genetic MTHFR status, you should be taking methyl-b12 (the form which is already ready-to-go and does not need to be converted into its usable form). Mike

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20 · July 09, 2013 at 12:54 PM

Most of the attention for histamine problems is given to DAO or gut functioning. However, the histamine metabolic process is more complex that and significantly involves another enzyme - histamine-N-methyltransferase (HNMT). HNMT is synthesized primarily in the liver, so if you have liver problems you may not be producing enough HNMT to methylate the histamine. Another option may be that hypothyroidism is simply slowing down the methylation cycle of that you aren't getting enough nutrients that are important for the methylation cycle (e.g., folate, b-12, methionine). For example, although liver is demonized because it has high levels of histamine, it also has significant amounts of b-12 and folate, both of which support the natural histamine methylation cycle. In either case, I'm not convinced that histamine problems are a disorder themselves rather than a symptom of some other systemic problems.

In my journey, I've ruled out low DAO as a problem since supplementation did not help. Additionally, anti-histamines don't help worth a crap. To me, this suggests is a problem with the methylation cycle and I've started looking at other problems. I discovered elevated liver enzymes. I've also started looking at adrenal fatigue as a problem since that affects thyroid and methylation and interacts with the liver. So, don't think that you are doomed to eat low histamine forever. Treat it as a symptom and start looking into other causes for those symptoms. Fix those causes and your histamine problem should subside.

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10 · October 16, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Another factor for some in histamine issues is mast cell activation disorder, a newly emerging dx category in the mast cell disease field. Unlike mastocytosis where the body produces excess mast cells (which would also be a histamine problem but more rare), in MCAD there aren't excess MCs but the rogue mast cells degranulate like crazy and spill their mediators (there are many), including histamine, inappropriately. Best overview I've seen is the Mastocytosis Society Canada website: http://www.mastocytosis.ca Low histamine diet plus other treatments are indicated.

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115 · February 22, 2012 at 5:26 PM

I have high histamine and allergies and avoid bringing lunch to work. Instead I have a big breakfast and dinner. If I'm away from home I take Histame, also anti-histamines along with digestive enzymes.

I'm getting better on Paleo diet. Also started experimenting with cold exposure and this appears to be greatly helping both the histamine problems and the IgE allergies.

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3850 · February 23, 2012 at 10:38 PM

Keli, can you provide any information on the cold exposure? From everything I've read it seems that cold exposure raises histamine levels. I would love to know more about what you're trying.

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:59 PM

Also, I actually had been eating the two meal a day way for the last few months. I only gave it up because I tended to feel awful after dinner. I thought it was just eating too much at once, but now it appears that it might be what I was eating (lots of pre-made slow cooker fare).

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3850 · February 22, 2012 at 5:52 PM

I was wondering about Histame, if only as a temprorary help with reducing the histamine-related irritation of my gut lining. Have you noticed positive effects from taking it?

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580 · May 16, 2012 at 9:44 AM

Cold exposure definitely rises my histamine level. I get very hitchy..

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 6:14 PM

Here's my notebook of histamine web clippings as I've been doing my research on it: https://www.evernote.com/pub/pcguys/histamines

Hope someone finds it useful,

Mike

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2319 · July 04, 2014 at 8:17 PM

thank you! Very helpful research. I think this is the missing link for my caveman spouse.

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 5:58 PM

I found this very nice list of foods and their relative histamine potential:

http://www.histaminintoleranz.ch/download/SIGHI-FoodCompatibilityList_HIT(EN).pdf

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0 · February 05, 2014 at 10:43 PM

I've also had really bad histamine intolerance. My advice is eat things your body can process easily for a few days. Steam leafy greens: asparagus, broccoli, parsley, fennel (so important). Try to stay away from spinach, in the digestive process it produces histamine.

What really worked for me, better than anything was fasting for a few days. Drink lots of naturally caffeine free teas preferably nettle and fennel and lots of water. At the end of the day just have steamed leafy green vegetables. It just gives your gut a chance to relax.

Most importantly, be fully aware of what your body is and isn't intolerant to. When you go on this very brief (two or three days) fast you can work out which foods set you off by introducing them one at a time.

Probiotics also really aided the healing process. Highly recommend. But do your research on which probiotics are good for a histamine free diet.

After a few days I started eating white fish and eggs. But only one portion every other day just to support my gut.

Really stay away from anything fermented - I mean ANYTHING.

I had strange intolerances, like butternut squash and garlic. Just respond to what your body can and can't process!

Good luck

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0 · December 11, 2013 at 5:55 PM

@Kelly 11To answer your original question of how to navigate food--I mostly eat out of the freezer. I cook in bulk, spread food on cookie trays and freeze. When frozen, the food is transferred to gallon zip lock bags. It's not exciting but around 80% of what I eat comes from the freezer. The staple foods always in my freezer are: Chicken, salmon, cod, potatoes, white rice, kale, butternut squash. Typical breakfast is potatoes, kale and 3 egg yolks sautéed in a pan. I add chicken on days I lift before breakfast. Lunch is a big salad with fish, blueberries and MCT oil as dressing (add frozen fish and frozen blueberries before I leave work and is defrosted by lunchtime). Dinner varies depending what my family is eating but when I'm on my own my staple meals are 1) Butternut squash, white rice and chicken or 2) Zucchini, onions or garlic, rice and chicken. I defrost frozen items then sautee with ghee or coconut oil. Hope this helps

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3280 · February 11, 2014 at 6:26 PM

I thought fish (salmon in particular) were really really high in histamine (as is kale). Glad you're able to tolerate it. I wonder if you cut out the highest histamine foods if the freezing wouldn't be as necessary.

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0 · May 13, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Gosh i am pretty sure i have high histamines the body/mind has been dealing with mild anxiety and insomonia for over a month droped 20lbs but am eating better now,feel great physically can run and hike like crazy but muscle streangth went in the pooper.Watery eyes[or very dry,lots of saliva,sometimes itchy, back pain,joint pain insomonia[getting better]on no gluten and dairy products for the most part,nervous stomach and loss of appetite.Anyway i wish there was a good Doctor around here that was versed in this field. Karl

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0 · January 31, 2013 at 11:03 AM

The GAPS diet advocates the use of meat stock early on in the diet when the body is not up to handling the longer cooked bone broth.

The meat stock recommended is cooked for 4-6 hours - meat and bones - and made into soups and stews.

This is much more healing on the digestive system than say bone broth done for 24 hours or more.

This kind of explains it:

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/stock-vs-broth-are-you-confused/

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3432 · December 04, 2012 at 3:07 PM

Have you tried Quercetin supplements? I can't really speak on its effectiveness, but supposedly...

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0 · December 04, 2012 at 2:44 PM

If you are histamine intolerant,flush, gastro issues, check out mast cell activation syndrome. That is probably your answer. It took me 43 years to figure it out! It must be treated, as it begins to affect things in the body.

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10 · August 04, 2012 at 3:47 AM

Actually cooking increases free amines, Roberto. If you are doing better with cooked eggs you likely have an egg intolerance/allergy of some kind. In spite of what some sites may say it appears (to me at least) that the most reputable recommend egg avoidance (cooked or not) for those with histamine intolerance (though some might be tolerated in baked goods). Hope this post isn't above your English tolerance ;).

@Rob. I don't know how you are determining the origin of your reactions, but supplemental iron isn't always advisable (and 50mg is a lot). Again the issue with supplements is the quick rate of absorption as they are isolated/free concentrates. The human body strictly regulates iron levels through enterohepatic circulation. The warnings on iron supps, although directed at children, are certainly applicable to adults as well.

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78422 · February 27, 2012 at 8:44 PM

HELLO,

I HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH HISTAMINE INTOLERANCE APPROX 2 YEARS AGO AND IT SEEMS TO BE GETTING WORSE BY THE DAY. MY SYMTOMS ARE A SWOLLEN FACE, AS WELL AS SWOLLEN, PAINFUL AND ITCHY EYES AND THIS SEEMS TO BE LASTING FOR DAYS. JUST WHEN I THINK IT IS GETTING BETTER IT STARTS ALL OVER AGAIN. I HAVE BEEN PESCRIBED EBASTIL - AN ANTI HISTAMIN AND DAOSIN - WHICH HAS TO BE TAKEN ABOUT 30 MINUTES BEFORE A MEAL, HOWEVER, THAT DOES NOT SEEM TO MAKE THE SLIGHTEST BIT OF DIFFERENCE.

WHO HAS GOT THE SAME SORT OF SYMTOMS AND CAN GIVE ADVICE. ANY ADVICE WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.

REGARDS

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78422 · February 23, 2012 at 9:05 PM

Kelly the Histame works pretty good for symptoms like flushing & itching and also seems to reduce stomach aches. It costs about $1 pill, so I only take it on occasion. It helps but does not completely eliminate my symptoms. I do have food allergies also so my symptoms may overlap. For me the Histame is worth the cost in order to have it available whenever necessary.

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