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How do you make bone broth?

by (3742)
Updated November 19, 2012 at 12:56 PM
Created November 18, 2012 at 3:01 PM

Just some general questions about bone broth. I bought a few pounds of short ribs and figured I could use the bones to make bone broth afterwards. Do you cook them in the slow cooker, stove top, or pressure cooker? How long do you cook them for? Do you save the bones to reuse again later? What else do you add? What's the ratio of bones to water?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 21, 2012 at 5:01 AM

I've had bland stocks where I've used beef bones without much on them. Sometimes I'm happy with it like that but at others I like something different... Making a flavroursome chicken stock without additions is easier for as well... Is not an all day etc undertaking either so can be done on shorter notice (although nparticularly ardous about leaving a pot on all day lol...

7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45
0 · November 19, 2012 at 11:11 PM

mine has always been delicious with no herbs added, solid chicken flavour with quality salt added in when I use it to drink, mmmmmm :) I've made it with celery and onion and other stuff too, but I think if you begin with a decent quality bone/meat, the flavour will be there

7b20db75b09540914bd0c852e868a9d6
0 · November 19, 2012 at 2:06 PM

no, ive never made it but i want too. i was just thinking it would be bland without herbs?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:37 PM

I do, depends on mood. Bayleaves pretty much are standard in all p reps, I like cinnamon sticks with stocks made from beef bones, or lamb. Star anise somtimes as well. Fresh herbs like sage thyme or parsley (or combos) aded in last 15 mins or so. Any cmbos you like and want to share?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:34 PM

Sometimes I roast, eat, then boil, sometimes just boil...

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790
0 · November 19, 2012 at 5:05 AM

True. For some weird reason, when you salt your food while cooking, it does not taste as good. It tastes much better when you salt it at the very end.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b
0 · November 19, 2012 at 4:53 AM

@VB, I agree. Including some of the b/broth in the soup adds flavour and substance. I tend to avoid putting much salt in the slowcooker so add plenty to the soup just before eating; that helps give it a 'fresh' salty taste.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790
0 · November 19, 2012 at 3:57 AM

Yes, I save the meat from my ox tails and I eat it. It is very tasty, but, for some weird reason, it only tastes good when you eat it with the same bone broth. I tried eating it separately - the flavor is not the same. They are the best when eaten together.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:07 AM

I follow the same approach and it works a treat. The lemon juice avoids the problem of some types of vinegar not being what they are supposed to be. Oxtail works great and I use the stained ingredients for soup by putting it in a mixer -- makes for a very hearty lunch.

235b077872243d4ee5796c6ace3c0970
0 · November 18, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Oh! And do you save the meat after straining? If so (I'd hope the answer is yes), is it good to go for a meal?

235b077872243d4ee5796c6ace3c0970
0 · November 18, 2012 at 4:15 PM

This is great; thanks for the information (like the OP, I'm new to bone broth). Are there any benefits to bones with/without meat? My local butcher doesn't sell bones, unfortunately, so ox tails would probably be my first choice...

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7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45
3
524 · November 18, 2012 at 3:42 PM

A google search will give you pages and pages of excellent blogs with detailed instructions on making any bone broth! Nourished Kitchen has quite a few articles, and a detailed FAQ... http://nourishedkitchen.com/reader-questions-bone-broth/

The first time I tried making it, I used a chicken carcass. Put it in a big glass pot, added enough cold water to just cover all the bones and scraps, added a splash of white vinegar (maybe 1.5 tbsp) and let that sit for an hour before bringing to a gentle boil and then reducing the stovetop heat to very low. You want barely a bubble or 2 simmering. I leave it overnight and the all the next day, rarely need to add anymore water but you might. I use a potato smasher to crush the bones as they soften. It gells up like crazy after being strained and placed in the fridge.

D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d
2
1018 · November 19, 2012 at 1:12 AM

I've never made bone broth with anything other than the remains of a whole roast chicken, but I always use my slow cooker, and when/if I venture into the world of beef bone broth I'd do the same --

Add to slow cooker: chicken carcass + other scraps from roasting pan (or whatever bones 'n' bits you're using) some chunks of and/or scraps from carrots, onions, celery, garlic (used celeriac peelings last time -- tasty!) enough water to cover carcass + an inch or two approx 2 tablespoons cider vinegar (allegedly helps liberate minerals from bones) several grinds of black pepper & shakes of salt

Let it sit at room temp for about an hour (again for alleged additional mineral liberation)

Cook on low 6-12 hours (overnight for me usually)

Use a colander to strain

Enjoy some fresh, freeze the rest

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790
2
15390 · November 18, 2012 at 3:26 PM

I make three different kinds of bone broth. My favorite bone broth is made out of ... ox tails. They are DELISH!!! Never had anything better!!!

I use a slow cooker, low setting.

  1. bones with meat - about 4-6 hours

  2. re-used bones without meat - about 12 - 20 hours.

  3. hoofs - about 16 - 20 hours

I do it the easy way - I just put the bones in my slow cooker and pour the water over.

If I use bones with no meat or re-use my bones, I add juice from one lemon.

Bones to water ratio? As long as the bones are covered. Not too little, not too much. I would say most of the time I use hoofs so they take up half of my crock pot.

I do save bones to reuse them later. But the broth is not as strong the second time around.

My suggestion: start with the meat broth. Almost the same thing, but you don't cook them as long. Also, buy some ox tails. Seriously. They are the best thing I have ever tasted!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790
0 · November 19, 2012 at 5:05 AM

True. For some weird reason, when you salt your food while cooking, it does not taste as good. It tastes much better when you salt it at the very end.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b
0 · November 19, 2012 at 4:53 AM

@VB, I agree. Including some of the b/broth in the soup adds flavour and substance. I tend to avoid putting much salt in the slowcooker so add plenty to the soup just before eating; that helps give it a 'fresh' salty taste.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790
0 · November 19, 2012 at 3:57 AM

Yes, I save the meat from my ox tails and I eat it. It is very tasty, but, for some weird reason, it only tastes good when you eat it with the same bone broth. I tried eating it separately - the flavor is not the same. They are the best when eaten together.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:07 AM

I follow the same approach and it works a treat. The lemon juice avoids the problem of some types of vinegar not being what they are supposed to be. Oxtail works great and I use the stained ingredients for soup by putting it in a mixer -- makes for a very hearty lunch.

235b077872243d4ee5796c6ace3c0970
0 · November 18, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Oh! And do you save the meat after straining? If so (I'd hope the answer is yes), is it good to go for a meal?

235b077872243d4ee5796c6ace3c0970
0 · November 18, 2012 at 4:15 PM

This is great; thanks for the information (like the OP, I'm new to bone broth). Are there any benefits to bones with/without meat? My local butcher doesn't sell bones, unfortunately, so ox tails would probably be my first choice...

59e818af2184847f09c8a63a45adcdbb
0
80 · November 19, 2012 at 12:56 PM

How do folks cook beef bones that have marrow in them? I assume that 5-10 min quick cook then fishing them out, sucking out the marrow, then throwing the bones back into broth would be idea?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:34 PM

Sometimes I roast, eat, then boil, sometimes just boil...

7b20db75b09540914bd0c852e868a9d6
0
454 · November 19, 2012 at 12:45 PM

you guys don't add any spices or herbs?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 21, 2012 at 5:01 AM

I've had bland stocks where I've used beef bones without much on them. Sometimes I'm happy with it like that but at others I like something different... Making a flavroursome chicken stock without additions is easier for as well... Is not an all day etc undertaking either so can be done on shorter notice (although nparticularly ardous about leaving a pot on all day lol...

7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45
0 · November 19, 2012 at 11:11 PM

mine has always been delicious with no herbs added, solid chicken flavour with quality salt added in when I use it to drink, mmmmmm :) I've made it with celery and onion and other stuff too, but I think if you begin with a decent quality bone/meat, the flavour will be there

7b20db75b09540914bd0c852e868a9d6
0 · November 19, 2012 at 2:06 PM

no, ive never made it but i want too. i was just thinking it would be bland without herbs?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f
0 · November 19, 2012 at 1:37 PM

I do, depends on mood. Bayleaves pretty much are standard in all p reps, I like cinnamon sticks with stocks made from beef bones, or lamb. Star anise somtimes as well. Fresh herbs like sage thyme or parsley (or combos) aded in last 15 mins or so. Any cmbos you like and want to share?

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