A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0

Pressure Cooker Size & Type

by (0)
Updated about 11 hours ago
Created April 30, 2014 at 10:10 PM

I want to buy a pressure cooker to make bone broth and to cook other meals. I like the idea of canning with it too (maybe even can my bone broth...) but my immediate goal is broth and meals. I've seen some great pressure cooker recommendations on here, but no talk of what size is best. I started out thinking big to make a lot of bone broth at once, but then wonder if big enough for canning and a lot of broth would be too big for cooking a meal?

The stove top ones for canning say canning or cooking, but 21+ quarts seems too big for a regular size meal.

And then stove top over electric? I started thinking stove top because they say it's faster and you get more pressure, but read on here how you have to monitor those and electric is more convenient, and now I'm leaning that way. I think convenience will win for me.

BUT most electric ones seem to be 6 quarts which is a little small to me for bone broth. (I did bone broth in my 6 quart slow cooker and wished it was bigger.) Of course if it takes less time I won't mind making the bone broth more often.

Your thoughts? I'd love any input on size, type, and what I might want to use it for in the future that I've not considered yet... Random thoughts are welcome... Many thanks!

E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a
15 · May 04, 2014 at 12:48 AM

I have never seen an automatic pressure cooker. I prefer to have control of a manual, but you also have the risk that you leave it alone and it overpressurizes.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d
5949 · May 04, 2014 at 12:02 AM

I've learned what temperature to turn the burner down to once it has reached full pressure. I check in every now and then to make sure the valve button is still indicating full pressure, but it's not like it has to be watched constantly.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d
5949 · May 03, 2014 at 10:33 PM

I wholeheartedly second the recommendation on a Kuhn Rikon. We've had our old Duromatic more than 20 years, and the only problem we ever had was when it finally needed a new gasket.

Total Views
750

Recent Activity
E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a

Last Activity
174D AGO

Followers
4

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

9 Answers

A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0
0 · May 03, 2014 at 11:10 PM

@Alex and @pone - I looked up the Kuhn and it appears to be a stove top one. Do you prefer that to automatic? Do you have to watch it a lot while it's' in use? I was originally leaning toward stove top thinking it was more control and could achieve higher pressure, but reading that you have to watch it discouraged me some. The "set it and forget it" concept of the electric ones started to really appeal to me. My latest thought was to get an 8 qt electric one for now, and a bigger stove top one if/when I get serious about the idea of doing some pressure canning.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d
5949 · May 04, 2014 at 12:02 AM

I've learned what temperature to turn the burner down to once it has reached full pressure. I check in every now and then to make sure the valve button is still indicating full pressure, but it's not like it has to be watched constantly.

E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a
15 · May 04, 2014 at 12:48 AM

I have never seen an automatic pressure cooker. I prefer to have control of a manual, but you also have the risk that you leave it alone and it overpressurizes.

E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a
0
15 · May 03, 2014 at 7:49 PM

My main bone broth pressure cooker is the 7 quart Kuhn Rikon Duromatic. They have a 5 quart as well, but for a week's worth of bone broth for two people 7 quart is really the way to go. The Kuhn Rikon is expensive but has lots of safety features that I think are desirable because a pressure cooker explosion will leave you with some pretty terrible burns.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d
5949 · May 03, 2014 at 10:33 PM

I wholeheartedly second the recommendation on a Kuhn Rikon. We've had our old Duromatic more than 20 years, and the only problem we ever had was when it finally needed a new gasket.

A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0
0 · May 03, 2014 at 7:43 PM

I have not bought my pressure cooker yet if anyone else has any suggestions. By the way, I looked at wellness meats again and they have some great products but their pricing is no where near as good as I thought it was. I thought it was per pound but it's per cut of meat which is usually a lot less than a lb. I guess good meat is just expensive! I do like how they have one flat fee for S&H per order.

A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0
0 · May 01, 2014 at 3:30 AM

@missmiddlemarch wow thank you! I just looked up wellness meats and their pricing is very reasonable. I thought shipping would make it too expensive but they don't even charge shipping, just a flat processing fee per order.

Good point when you say: "$10 for the bag of bones that makes broth for 2 weeks is less than my old coffee habit cost..." My husband points out that yes, this stuff if more expensive (grass fed beef, coconut oil/flour, almond flour, etc...) but a little goes a long way and look at what we were spending on chips, soda, etc. I guess when it's a vice you don't question the cost! I just don't want to be a fool spending a lot of money on something that is not really different, but I'm pretty convinced grass fed beef is significantly healthier.

I too felt much better after giving up gluten. Ironically, I did it for my husband when we went on an elimination diet for HIS health issues. I thought I was 100% fine. But when we tested eating gluten again I was the one who noticed all kinds of ill effects, anxiety/tension/brain fog/rash - crazy. Corn also affects me in the worst way.

0f8f77156cd0667d43194fc4b8bc3b5d
0
60 · May 01, 2014 at 3:17 AM

I also have no more neck/shoulder pain, but can't tell if it was giving up gluten, dairy or coffee, (because I changed so many dietary things at once). I save all my bones from bone-in cuts of organic meat or fowl (e.g. whole organic chicken from Trader Joe's) in a plastic container in the freezer until there is enough to make that kind of broth. I buy grass-fed beef bones and fish bones in the frozen section of Whole Foods. I've also bought organic bison and lamb bones from U.S. Wellness Meats on line and had them shipped to my door. I was afraid of not using organic/grass-fed bones as those bones are crumbly after hours under pressure and I am then eating whatever that animal was raised on from the depths of their bones, so thought it worth it to pay the money.

$10 for the bag of bones that makes broth for 2 weeks is less than my old coffee habit cost, even less if I count the money I save not going to Peet's or Starbucks anymore. :)

A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0
0 · May 01, 2014 at 3:02 AM

@missmiddlemarch smoother skin, less hip pain, warm and yummy morning treat -- it sounds like bone broth was made for me! :-) I drank coffee daily, but such a small amount I though it couldn't possibly be affecting me (1/4 cup in a lot of milk) but when I cut it out I had much less anxiety and less neck and shoulder pain/stiffness, less insomnia. Overall I was more at peace. (I think other diet changes also helped.) Can I ask - where do you get your bones? I don't have enough from regular cooking. I found soup bones at whole foods but $10 for a couple bones -- it seems kind of extreme. I haven't checked with mainstream grocery stores yet, I have just assumed they don't sell them.

0f8f77156cd0667d43194fc4b8bc3b5d
0
60 · May 01, 2014 at 2:40 AM

@LauralnSD, I was also VERY attached to my morning coffee, but anxiety, heart palpitations and the fact that sometimes I could just barely make it to the bathroom in time when that caffeine hit my colon, was enough to make me change my ways. Once I started with the broth and had a substitute warm, soothing cup of something to look forward to each morning, it was easy to switch over. The broth has made my hair and nails grow like crazy! My skin seems softer, wrinkles smoother, and much less hip joint pain. I've tried bones of: bison, lamb, turkey, chicken & fish, but like beef broth best.

A0ebae38942d151f0d8fb227317c97ac
0
0 · May 01, 2014 at 2:22 AM

@missmiddlemarch thank you! Have you felt noticeable benefits from drinking the broth daily? I like the idea of the cup in the morning instead of coffee. I am very sensitive to caffeine (in a bad way) but am emotionally attached to the idea of a ritualistic reward for getting up. This might be a perfect replacement for coffee.

I've made two batches the slow way so far. The first with beef, pork, & lamb bones and it was delicious, I loved it. My second batch was chicken and honestly I don't like it. The first was luscious, savory, felt nourishing. There is something icky to me about the chicken one.

It sounds like your pot makes a decent amount. I do see an 8 quart stainless steel one by Go Wise which could yield a little more. But I have read a lot of good reviews about the Instant Pot ones.

BTW for Pet People: I don't put onion in mine because my bone broth is also the "healthy treat" I finally found for my dogs. They LOVE it! (even the chicken flavor...) So I sacrificed the onion and we all have bone broth in the morning.

0f8f77156cd0667d43194fc4b8bc3b5d
0
60 · May 01, 2014 at 1:53 AM

I use this Instant Pot for making bone broth. It usually makes 4 1/2 - 1quart wide mouth mason jars of broth, which I then freeze and thaw out as needed. I make those last two weeks (I dilute the broth with a little water when I heat it up), so I only have to make bone broth every 14 days. (I drink a cup of broth every morning instead of coffee.) If you want to use my bone broth recipe, it is here.

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account

Get Free Paleo Recipes