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Dissolving eggshells using X solution?

by (393)
Updated September 16, 2014 at 7:19 PM
Created March 08, 2011 at 4:11 PM

I intend to use eggshells to make my own calcium supplement. I read somewhere that eggshells submerged in acetic acid yield calcium acetate. Is this true? And if so, would submerging them in lemon juice eventually yield calcium citrate?

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393 · March 09, 2011 at 3:33 AM

I'll wash the eggshells and submerge them in lemon juice. Wait until reaction is complete and then it's up to you whether you wish to dehydrate the mix to get powder. It's supposed to be about 1800 mg elemental calcium per medium eggshell.

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10768 · March 09, 2011 at 2:33 AM

Here is a clever description::: I learned to make coffee from Steinbeck, who himself learned "on Bourbon Street from giants in the earth": "I went into my house and set coffee to cooking, and remembering how Roark Bradford liked it, I doubled the dosage, two heaping tablespoons of coffee to each cup and two heaping for the pot. I cracked an egg and cupped out the yolk and dropped white and shells into the pot, for I know nothing that polishes coffee and makes it shine like that." That, and "a little chicory for bite". All in all, a truly outstanding cup of coffee, for those dedicated few.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded
10768 · March 09, 2011 at 2:30 AM

I've tried it and the shells sort of get soggy and wilty. I would not keep them together in the fridge, but frozen = inert to me. I'm also reminded of the old eggshells in coffee bit.

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22913 · March 08, 2011 at 8:41 PM

Hopefully he's eating the yolk of the eggs he's melting down.

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8858 · March 08, 2011 at 8:30 PM

Good idea. Have you tried this? I keep a bag of bones in my freezer until I have enough for broth. Any issues with keeping eggshells and bones together in the freezer? My "kosher" sense is offended but I'm not sure why...

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1932 · March 08, 2011 at 8:26 PM

Hmm....I see PH doesn't like carriage returns. There should be some line breaks in there.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895
1932 · March 08, 2011 at 8:25 PM

Well, my hero and "other half" (who DID study chemistry in college) sent me this explanation: Calcium Carbonate + Acetic Acid ==> Calcium Acetate + CO2 + water Calcium Carbonate + Citric Acid ==> Calcium Citrate + CO2 + water Lemon juice contains citric acid.

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168
290 · March 08, 2011 at 7:25 PM

Can you explain this process? I am intrigued ...

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4 Answers

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10768 · March 08, 2011 at 8:03 PM

You can add them to a working Bone Broth with a bit of Vinegar, and the calcium you seek will go into the soup that you drink.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded
10768 · March 09, 2011 at 2:33 AM

Here is a clever description::: I learned to make coffee from Steinbeck, who himself learned "on Bourbon Street from giants in the earth": "I went into my house and set coffee to cooking, and remembering how Roark Bradford liked it, I doubled the dosage, two heaping tablespoons of coffee to each cup and two heaping for the pot. I cracked an egg and cupped out the yolk and dropped white and shells into the pot, for I know nothing that polishes coffee and makes it shine like that." That, and "a little chicory for bite". All in all, a truly outstanding cup of coffee, for those dedicated few.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded
10768 · March 09, 2011 at 2:30 AM

I've tried it and the shells sort of get soggy and wilty. I would not keep them together in the fridge, but frozen = inert to me. I'm also reminded of the old eggshells in coffee bit.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be
8858 · March 08, 2011 at 8:30 PM

Good idea. Have you tried this? I keep a bag of bones in my freezer until I have enough for broth. Any issues with keeping eggshells and bones together in the freezer? My "kosher" sense is offended but I'm not sure why...

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1
39821 · March 08, 2011 at 7:12 PM

You'd probably want to ensure that you are consuming sufficient amounts of vitamin K2 in order to mineralize all of that calcium.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · March 08, 2011 at 8:41 PM

Hopefully he's eating the yolk of the eggs he's melting down.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895
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1932 · March 08, 2011 at 7:57 PM

Well, now this brings up a question (I am not a chemist - never even took it in school, so please understand the ignorance). Various references I see on the internet, such as http://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=461 indicate that the calcium in eggs is not citrate, but carbonate.

Is there something in the acid that then changes the carbonate to citrate, or is there a different problem/issue?

I notice also that the OP mentions acetic acid, which I have always understood to be a major component of vinegar, but then mentions soaking the eggshells in lemon juice.

I'm lost.....

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895
1932 · March 08, 2011 at 8:26 PM

Hmm....I see PH doesn't like carriage returns. There should be some line breaks in there.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895
1932 · March 08, 2011 at 8:25 PM

Well, my hero and "other half" (who DID study chemistry in college) sent me this explanation: Calcium Carbonate + Acetic Acid ==> Calcium Acetate + CO2 + water Calcium Carbonate + Citric Acid ==> Calcium Citrate + CO2 + water Lemon juice contains citric acid.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5
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393 · March 08, 2011 at 6:50 PM

Update: no need to answer because I found out that, indeed, citric acid and eggshells will yield, among other ingredients, calcium citrate. It will be simple enough to make and won't have nearly as much lead as bone meal, if certain studies are to be trusted.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5
393 · March 09, 2011 at 3:33 AM

I'll wash the eggshells and submerge them in lemon juice. Wait until reaction is complete and then it's up to you whether you wish to dehydrate the mix to get powder. It's supposed to be about 1800 mg elemental calcium per medium eggshell.

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168
290 · March 08, 2011 at 7:25 PM

Can you explain this process? I am intrigued ...

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