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Too Much Calcium From Bones ? Marrow Rancidity ?

by (5)
Updated May 25, 2014 at 4:30 AM
Created May 24, 2014 at 12:54 PM

(Calculation corrected)

I've read in a few topics here that many users eat chewable bones of bone broth/stock. I have been doing it for maybe more than a month or for a few months but currently I changed my mind. (I've been doing it thinking it might help my teeth which were affected by excessive use of sodium bicarbonate, dipping my toothbrush with natural toothpaste in it daily)

If we assume 7% hydroxylapatite by weight in bones, which is 40.078 / 502.31 =~ 0.079787... calcium by weight, than bone is %0.56 calcium by weight, and magnesium is negligable as far as I know.

So if you eat 100 grams, you get 100,000 x 7 / 100 x 8 / 100 = 560 mg calcium, and that's about what comes with a cup of broth with how I prepare.

If you are one of them, how do you balance it with magnesium ? Supplementing ? How much of what ? What ratio do you try to keep ?

I also found @Katherine shared this on the search, apparently cow and sheep have 50% lecithin in their marrow, which is great:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1215201/pdf/biochemj00768-0259.pdf

but after all the cooking, can marrow be something you don't want ?

I think I once read somebody stating Chris Masterjohn didn't eat any fatty part of broth...

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20
5 · May 25, 2014 at 4:30 AM

Some of my broth turned white last time and all were easily chewable. I thought the color change might reflect the amount of the leaching minerals.

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41297 · May 24, 2014 at 5:43 PM

The bones or the broth? Bones, sure… the broth… no way. Eating bones is ok, but some folks just take the "reenactment" side of things too far… hardly necessary.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20
5 · May 24, 2014 at 5:19 PM

If you heat it long enough and make the bone edible, and eat it, that's about what it has.

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41297 · May 24, 2014 at 2:46 PM

Broth is nice and all, but it's not a super-duper source of nutrition. You really think a cup of broth has 500 mg of Ca? Twice as much as milk? No way.

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1077 · May 24, 2014 at 9:37 PM

I have taken a slightly different approach. The ratios that concern calcium are two: Ca/P (sources say 2 to 2.5 is optimal, similar to our own bones) and Ca/Mg (2 to 1, but paleolithic diets may have been around 1 to 1).

I don't need the extra P from cow bones, since I already eat meat, fish, eggs, natto, peas and rice. I concur that the Ca stays mostly in bones, no matter how long you cook your bones, and no matter how much vinegar you add. So I eat my eggs whole. The egg shells are dried in the oven and pulverized in the coffee grinder. They contain Ca, small amounts of Mg, traces of lesser micronutrients. No P. I take a tea spoon in my smoothie.

Mg comes from eating lots of fruits and vegetables. No way around fruits and vegetables really.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20
5 · May 25, 2014 at 4:30 AM

Some of my broth turned white last time and all were easily chewable. I thought the color change might reflect the amount of the leaching minerals.

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