Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5
0

Is cancer a metabolic disease?

by (10994)
Updated about 18 hours ago
Created April 24, 2014 at 9:28 PM

Emerging evidence indicates that impaired cellular energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of nearly all cancers regardless of cellular or tissue origin. In contrast to normal cells, which derive most of their usable energy from oxidative phosphorylation, most cancer cells become heavily dependent on substrate level phosphorylation to meet energy demands. Evidence is reviewed supporting a general hypothesis that genomic instability and essentially all hallmarks of cancer, including aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), can be linked to impaired mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. A view of cancer as primarily a metabolic disease will impact approaches to cancer management and prevention.

Is cancer a body's failure to attain global metabolic fitness?

-http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/719423

-http://www.singlecausesinglecure.org/metabolic-theory-of-cancer/

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5
10994 · April 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

This is a good video, ty for sharing!

Medium avatar
598 · April 25, 2014 at 6:36 PM

This is one reason I've been looking into protein fasting. It makes sense that H/G peoples would spend a day here and there with no meat and little protein/mostly fruit. Heck, they might go a week without a good kill and then engorge for a couple days before the corpse rots.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46
41442 · April 25, 2014 at 5:48 PM

Hunter-gatherers don't run out of food. Women would gather and men would hunt. Gathered foods were dependable, hunted foods were not. It's a way to romanticize fasting.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c
787 · April 25, 2014 at 4:33 PM

Abstaining from food for a period of time, it could be skipping the odd meal or not eating food for many days, both could be called 'paleo' as our ancestors wouldn't have eaten 3 meals per day everyday for their whole lives, and would've at time run out of food possibly for days on end

Medium avatar
0 · April 25, 2014 at 4:06 PM

I'm relatively new to Paleo. What sort of fasting would help this?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7
26182 · April 25, 2014 at 12:28 PM

ask Lance Armstrong

Total Views
739

Recent Activity
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

Last Activity
180D AGO

Followers
7

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

4 Answers

7a777966a2b7f30251c358b6fe35936f
0
0 · April 26, 2014 at 11:38 AM

Latest evidences shows that cancer should also be considered as a metabolic disease. Cancer is associated with meatbolic changes. The metabolic profile of tumor cells has been suggested to reflect the rapid proliferative rate.

Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158
0
529 · April 26, 2014 at 8:24 AM

Since we're on a Paleo forum, this lecture by Dr. Eugene Fine immediately came to mind: http://youtu.be/04A5U6IlHqk

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5
10994 · April 26, 2014 at 1:33 PM

This is a good video, ty for sharing!

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc
0
690 · April 26, 2014 at 4:25 AM

Here's a post on the metabolism of cancer cells

Peter Attia

http://eatingacademy.com/nutrition/war-cancer

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84
0
17103 · April 25, 2014 at 10:27 AM

One of the features is that the mitochondria in cancerous cells is broken and can only process glucose (and possibly fructose), they cannot do beta oxidation - (the other, more critical, is that they no longer respond to apoptosis.) So in that sense, yes.

Note that there are some cancers where this isn't true, and they can do beta oxidation, so it won't work in every case. But as a general preventative rule, it's a good idea to do some fasting once in a while so as to kill off any cells with broken mitochondria and invoke apoptosis in marginal ones.

Medium avatar
0 · April 25, 2014 at 4:06 PM

I'm relatively new to Paleo. What sort of fasting would help this?

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account

Get Free Paleo Recipes