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Sourdough and Macros

by (245)
Updated about 21 hours ago
Created March 03, 2014 at 3:49 AM

Heard this mentioned on a podcast. I'm curious as to why it isn't being widely used in the paleo community. Is there something besides the gluten in there that people don't like? Seems like a far better option than the various other pseudo-breads out there and even 'safe' starches like rice for example - which is relatively devoid of nutrition.

Also I'm curious about macro ratios in general. I know this obviously is a fairly contentious topic with no clear answer. But if you're not gaining weight can you have as many carbs as you like until you are? Where would the limit be? Somewhere in 20%-60% of calories?

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997 · March 04, 2014 at 4:47 PM

There are a handful of Italian studies that show or imply this.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14766592

As a celiac, I wouldn't do it at home but souring/fermenting glutenfree grains works for me in moderation, much better than cooked white rice for example. Fermented rice is probably the way for me to go.

2eb1b3e896624be5506029e3fec3e9e2
0 · March 04, 2014 at 2:22 AM

paleotards hold firmly to the view that everyone is gluten intolerant and the government promotes frankenwheat to get everyone sick cuz theyre in the pockets of big pharma.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9
245 · March 03, 2014 at 11:37 PM

I believe the trick is to keep a running sourdough culture which gets more and more 'sour' over time.

While I personally believe I benefited from removing grains, I certainly do enjoy bread products.

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245 · March 03, 2014 at 7:30 PM

Seems like a red herring answer.

Most people are not celiacs, and I've seen it commented that people even with significant gluten sensitivities can tolerate it well. Why not include a more nutrient dense/less harmful source of carbs if you're going to eat them?

If your argument is simply we never should eat anything less nutrient dense then liver...well...I'm not even going to argue against it, because I don't think anyone can seriously hold that view.

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3 Answers

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690 · March 04, 2014 at 6:25 AM

I used to to very much enjoy good bread.

When I was first sliding towards paleo (Blood Sugar Solution, 4 Hour Body, Primal Blueprint) I really missed bread. I made sure it was part of my cheat day and even investigated store bought 'paleo bread' for regular use. After I finally 'arrived' at paleo, I realized that the paleo pseudo-breads were pretty much Frankenfoods and probably not worth consuming.

But for those wanting a bread that is less harmful.......

Article about a fellow who makes a sourdough bread with a LONG ferment... not days but weeks. Gluten senstive folks swear by his bread. I was intrigued by the product but schedule of late has not alligned with the two LA are Farmers' Markets that be attends.

http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/our-daily-bread

With respect to what @samc posted.. yes there is a study about greatly reduced gluten due the flour used and the ferment done.

http://aem.asm.org/content/70/2/1088.full?ijkey=9ec21f12c3108ac644cb2085608b315ca768450d

I even toyed with the idea of making a low gluten bread by going the same route...an ancient wheat & customized fermentation. But as a famous movie character once said "that sounds like a lot of work". :)

I'm with @samc, I've given up bread though I do eat thinly sliced & toasted modern sour dough bagette with cheese very occasionally.

and finally

http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/our-daily-bread

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198 · March 03, 2014 at 11:25 PM

I read one study that showed a long ferment with sourdough culture took the Gluten down to a barely detectable level. Don't ask me to cite it because I don't remember where it was. I'd think doing sourdough with ancient grains would produce an acceptable loaf of bread if you needed to eat one. I've given up bread and don't want to go back.

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720
997 · March 04, 2014 at 4:47 PM

There are a handful of Italian studies that show or imply this.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14766592

As a celiac, I wouldn't do it at home but souring/fermenting glutenfree grains works for me in moderation, much better than cooked white rice for example. Fermented rice is probably the way for me to go.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9
245 · March 03, 2014 at 11:37 PM

I believe the trick is to keep a running sourdough culture which gets more and more 'sour' over time.

While I personally believe I benefited from removing grains, I certainly do enjoy bread products.

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17103 · March 03, 2014 at 11:15 AM

Because fermenting doesn't get rid of the gluten, you might disable some, but not all.

When folks have actual issues with gluten (i.e. celiac), any exposure to the stuff, even in small amounts will create immunoglobulins that can cause, or continue autoimmune diseases. So while in theory it might sound nice that you can sprout, ferment grains, and get away with eating them, in practice it's still a bad idea.

If you're worried about nutrition, don't bother eating bread. Eat liver. All breads are devoid of nutrition when compared to liver, and there won't be a large glycemic response.

Don't try to justify eating a bad whole-grain "food" by claiming it has better nutrition than a fake version made with rice flour, especially when the whole food comes with a load of antinutrients and toxins.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9
245 · March 03, 2014 at 7:30 PM

Seems like a red herring answer.

Most people are not celiacs, and I've seen it commented that people even with significant gluten sensitivities can tolerate it well. Why not include a more nutrient dense/less harmful source of carbs if you're going to eat them?

If your argument is simply we never should eat anything less nutrient dense then liver...well...I'm not even going to argue against it, because I don't think anyone can seriously hold that view.

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