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Coconut Milk + Protein Powder = Not Efficient??

by (2302)
Updated about 17 hours ago
Created July 23, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Let's keep it simple...

So fat inhibits absorption of protein. Coconut milk has a lot of fat. If I made my protein shakes with coconut milk, would the fat from the coconut milk inhibit the absorption of the protein powder?

I KNOW it's better to eat real food and I KNOW this is splitting hairs...but it would be nice to get a scientific approach to an answer. Thank you.

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11254 · August 30, 2013 at 5:36 PM

I suspect he probably did that years ago, before this podcast: http://robbwolf.com/2012/11/27/kiefer-carb-backloading-episode-160/ If you just can't handle carbs, I suppose you could do that, but I could not gain muscle until I started adding carbs in after workouts. If you do add carbs, don't add fat. You want to get the insulin spike over and done with, and recent research seems to suggest it just stays above normal for hours if you eat carbs&fat together. And then there is the issue of gaining fat... So, eat fat on off days and before workouts (if you eat before workouts at all).

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88 · August 28, 2013 at 3:17 AM

what about robb wolf's use of coconut milk and protein powder post workout in an experiment while trying to lean out? From what I understand the fat was supposed to blunt the insulin response while enabling protein to repair the damaged muscle tissue... is there actually any benefit to doing that?

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2302 · August 06, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Word thank you!

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2 Answers

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11254 · July 23, 2013 at 5:23 PM

This is a timing issue. Post workout- carbs + protein = success! On days off, your coconut milk + protein powder may be a helpful way to get your protein in for that day. Your body will still be able to utilize that protein. Presumably, it will just take a little longer for it to get where it needs to go.

Now, considering price, it may be better to eat your fatty meats with less expensive proteins, and save your protein powder for your workout days. Whey protein is pretty insulinogenic, so it probably makes sense to use it when you want to encourage insulin release, and not when you don't.

86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25
2302 · August 06, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Word thank you!

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44
88 · August 28, 2013 at 3:17 AM

what about robb wolf's use of coconut milk and protein powder post workout in an experiment while trying to lean out? From what I understand the fat was supposed to blunt the insulin response while enabling protein to repair the damaged muscle tissue... is there actually any benefit to doing that?

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6
11254 · August 30, 2013 at 5:36 PM

I suspect he probably did that years ago, before this podcast: http://robbwolf.com/2012/11/27/kiefer-carb-backloading-episode-160/ If you just can't handle carbs, I suppose you could do that, but I could not gain muscle until I started adding carbs in after workouts. If you do add carbs, don't add fat. You want to get the insulin spike over and done with, and recent research seems to suggest it just stays above normal for hours if you eat carbs&fat together. And then there is the issue of gaining fat... So, eat fat on off days and before workouts (if you eat before workouts at all).

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8574 · July 23, 2013 at 4:34 PM

From what I understand fats are the last to be digested (hydrophobic/"float") and fats trigger the release of CCK which along with signalling bile juices and enzymes to be excreted into the small intestine, it delays gastric (stomach) emptying.

So possibly this delay in chyme entering the small intestine would delay proteins digestion and amino acid absorption in the small intestines.

I am not entirely sure whether this really makes any significant or measurable difference though. Even less so with the amount you are getting in your shake.

As a side note, a slow digesting protein such as casein would be another matter (as would a complex carbohydrate) due to their digestion in the small intestine. The benefits being obvious if that is what one requires.

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