3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
3

Cleaning up after Coconut Oil

by (480)
Updated September 16, 2014 at 7:17 PM
Created December 30, 2010 at 7:06 PM

I guess this is one of those nitty-gritty questions. I have ruined more sponges than I can count when cleaning up after coconut oil in pots and pans (stainless steel and cast iron). How do you clean it up? I really find it to be a big pain! Thanks!

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5
2423 · July 23, 2011 at 1:01 AM

It's something like this: http://www.webstaurantstore.com/images/27140501_lg.jpg

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9
439 · July 22, 2011 at 9:56 PM

Mr. Clean magic erasers even go through the wash really well!

Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205
1471 · July 22, 2011 at 8:57 PM

what kind of brush was it, the link doenst work anymore?

C16d506f10d910db0736bfd0d0e3809a
10 · January 01, 2011 at 9:54 PM

Cast iron is the way to go. Clean-up's a breeze and any molecules left behind are cooked into the next dish.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · January 01, 2011 at 7:50 PM

I really, really need to do this. I always wait, ugh! Thanks for the tip!

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1
18671 · December 31, 2010 at 6:22 PM

You can also put water in and bring it to a boil.

Cb98b33ebb8c8d159e2082d6f7d510b1
0 · December 31, 2010 at 8:46 AM

Yes, it's quick and easy. I change my sponge everyday and just throw the dirty ones in my "hot wash" laundry pile.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd
2633 · December 31, 2010 at 5:58 AM

Water pressure, or lack thereof, is probably your problem. Without the ability to blast it off, then yeah you have to rely on other mechanical means. I think in your case you have to get as much off as possible by physically scraping while it's a soft solid before going to the sponge. We have little 2 inch square plastic scrapers that are great for getting solids off pots & pans before they go into the wash basin. You might consider something like that or some of the other tools people recommended. Regardless, definitely save the sponge for last, and just to remove any remaining film.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:18 PM

My water pressure is the pits. It's especially worse since we had a water-saving device installed in it.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:15 PM

I like it. My kitchen towels are mostly cut-up old bath towels so this method will really work for me.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:14 PM

Wild! I reuse kitchen towels but I never thought to do this!

Total Views
3.6K

Recent Activity
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

Last Activity
11D AGO

Followers
0

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

10 Answers

best answer

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb
5
6550 · December 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM

I keep a ton of cheap kitchen towels around that I wipe the pan with after dumping the oil, which saves the sponge and makes cleanup easier. I toss them in the wash with the napkins and dog towels and all the other scuzzy stuff. Easy and more eco-friendly than my mom's method of paper towels.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:15 PM

I like it. My kitchen towels are mostly cut-up old bath towels so this method will really work for me.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
3
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:20 PM

Clean while pans warm.

That's it, no soap, no tricks...

It's solid at lower temp and liquid at higher.

My cast iron pans take seconds to wipe out because I never let the pan cool and therefore harden.

C16d506f10d910db0736bfd0d0e3809a
10 · January 01, 2011 at 9:54 PM

Cast iron is the way to go. Clean-up's a breeze and any molecules left behind are cooked into the next dish.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · January 01, 2011 at 7:50 PM

I really, really need to do this. I always wait, ugh! Thanks for the tip!

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5
2
2423 · December 30, 2010 at 7:46 PM

My sponge doesn't go anywhere near my pans until this guy does the heavy lifting: http://www.alliedkenco.com/catalog/images/SCRUB%20BRUSH.jpg

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5
2423 · July 23, 2011 at 1:01 AM

It's something like this: http://www.webstaurantstore.com/images/27140501_lg.jpg

Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205
1471 · July 22, 2011 at 8:57 PM

what kind of brush was it, the link doenst work anymore?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247
1
37177 · July 22, 2011 at 9:10 PM

VINEGAR! All of the above are right on track, but I'd add that as soon as I take the hot food out of the pan I pour in some white vinegar, then some water. While I eat, the vinegar does the work for me and I just wipe and rinse.

Note: I usually don't have that much free grease in the pan, so I pour it with the food and dip meat pieces in it. If there's too much for me to eat it with the meat, then I pour the excess into any suitable container and cool before putting it in the trash.

1c69e0879129f370c056bfdbd54e9e11
1
10 · December 31, 2010 at 9:22 AM

Just use a paper towel, its by far the easiest method for cleaning my pans. Once I've finished cooling i'll reheat the pan so the oil becomes easier to remove. No need to bother with water or washing up liquid. But once its clean leave the gas on a high temperature to remove all bacteria.

4564de0416aadac7c375f2c60b0caa5b
0
0 · October 01, 2012 at 2:22 AM

Mom and I wipe the majority of it off with paper towels. It gets cold around here so if we don't do that, we get into the drains and it can clog them up once it hardens again.

Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205
0
1471 · July 22, 2011 at 9:01 PM

If I would use my own advise more often I paper towels left but if you only save the papertowels that you dried your freshly washed hands on and re-used them you could use them for nasty stuff like oil.

Cb98b33ebb8c8d159e2082d6f7d510b1
0
0 · December 30, 2010 at 7:34 PM

You can always wash your sponges in the dishwasher or washing machine to get them clean again.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9
439 · July 22, 2011 at 9:56 PM

Mr. Clean magic erasers even go through the wash really well!

Cb98b33ebb8c8d159e2082d6f7d510b1
0 · December 31, 2010 at 8:46 AM

Yes, it's quick and easy. I change my sponge everyday and just throw the dirty ones in my "hot wash" laundry pile.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:14 PM

Wild! I reuse kitchen towels but I never thought to do this!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd
0
2633 · December 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM

For me, I clean it up like any oil... scrape out the worst into the trash, use hot water to heat up and get the rest of the worst flowing down the drain, finally detergent to dissolve away the remaining amounts. I use a soapy kitchen sponge last to remove any remaining film on the pot or pan. Unless it's cast iron, then after the hot water rinse I give it a gentle wipe with a sponge to any stuck-on parts then dry with a paper towel.

In my experience coconut oil cleans up easier than most as it flows at such a low temperature. A hot water will rinse most of it away. Or I can use a rubber scraper to get most of it out and into the trash if it is warm enough to be soft, but not yet liquid.

Finally, how's the water pressure at your kitchen sink. It just occurred to me I rely on water pressure from the faucet to do most of the work. Perhaps that is the key?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1
18671 · December 31, 2010 at 6:22 PM

You can also put water in and bring it to a boil.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd
2633 · December 31, 2010 at 5:58 AM

Water pressure, or lack thereof, is probably your problem. Without the ability to blast it off, then yeah you have to rely on other mechanical means. I think in your case you have to get as much off as possible by physically scraping while it's a soft solid before going to the sponge. We have little 2 inch square plastic scrapers that are great for getting solids off pots & pans before they go into the wash basin. You might consider something like that or some of the other tools people recommended. Regardless, definitely save the sponge for last, and just to remove any remaining film.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885
480 · December 30, 2010 at 8:18 PM

My water pressure is the pits. It's especially worse since we had a water-saving device installed in it.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd
0
6235 · December 30, 2010 at 7:10 PM

Pour the oil into a jar. Soak the pan in warm soapy water with good detergent. Dump the water and repeat if it is really messy. Then attack with sponge.

You want to pour out as much of the soapy oil as you can instead of getting it in the sponge. The soap will break it up with time and a lot of it will end up in the water you pour out.

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account