4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
5

Sweetening Cocoa without Sweetener....

by (22913)
Updated about 18 hours ago
Created May 19, 2010 at 2:55 PM

No Artificials No Insulin Boosters No Stevia/Sugar Alcohol No Fruit

I'd like ways to hack my tastebuds

so far I know Coconut Flour/Oil and Cinnamon work well

what else is out there that's Food that canimpact that strong unsweetened cocoa flavor?

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 5:02 AM

Im a big hippie so i like the fact that it creates jobs for those less fortunate while keeping their habitat intact http://www.noble-house.tk/html/engels/Gamma_brochure/Fairworld_coconut_blossom_sugar.html

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:47 AM

*food. Omg, what insomnia can do to a brain!!! It's probably damaged from all the coconut sugar i eat, hahahaha!!

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:45 AM

*single not sungle :)

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:44 AM

It's only possibly damaging to your liver if over consumed. In my case that would't happen since i use maybe 2tbs a week, if that. It's another mass hysteria thing. I bet you'll find every sungle foid has something that could be potentially harmful.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:39 AM

agreed. natural liquid extracts like vanilla

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:39 AM

coconut sugar has a low GI because it has a lot of fructose, which causes a lot of stress for the liver just like agave nectar

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:36 AM

Sydney, that's a cool list, but he didn't even address xylitol!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:27 AM

are children paleo?

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:26 AM

^ are children paleo?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:26 AM

Carob is very sugary, even unsweetened. Then they sweeten it more to make it into the familiar food you know.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:18 AM

I personally think the jury is totally out on whether stevia is safe, regardless of its impact on insulin.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:17 AM

This is totally reasonable. The sweet receptors in the toungue and pancreas effect insulin release.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:14 AM

As for "natural", so is sassafras (which contains the most potent carcinogen known to man), datura, deadly nightshade berries, the coca leaf, the opium poppy and tobacco. I am not sure why people confuse natural for safe.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:12 AM

I have once read in some holistic database that stevia is anti-insulin like cinnamon and some other herbs (and its scientifically established that honey has insulin-like chemicals), so its within the realms of the possible that overall theres little effect

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 1:51 AM

^ Seeing as the insulin level significance is being compared to aspartame at the same caloric level (with a meal). Which has the sweeter taste/calorie? That BTW IMO doesnt say that stevia does induce insulin, only that it does produce significant insulin, with a meal, next to the same caloric amount of aspartame, and a higher caloric level of sucrose (with a meal). To infer something from that, id need more info.

20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3
0 · September 07, 2012 at 11:38 PM

mmm powdered children

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:28 PM

If there is a Whole Foods near you, you can get creamed coconut as "Coconut Butter", in the raw-foods section in most Whole Foods stores. If not, you can order online. I like these folks when I have to purchase other-than-locally: http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/category/coconut-products-coconut-milk.php

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:26 PM

Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels Stephen D. Anton, Ph.D., Corby K. Martin, Ph.D., Hongmei Han, M.S., Sandra Coulon, B.A., William T. Cefalu, M.D., Paula Geiselman, Ph.D., and Donald A. Williamson, Ph.D. Appetite Volume 55, Issue 1, August 2010, Pages 37-43 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666310000826

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:25 PM

I'm going to disagree with this. I grow my own stevia, and use the dried leaves or an alcohol extract for sweetening. It's completely natural, as long as you stick to either the extract version or the whole-leaf version. In addition, while it does stimulate insulin in the presence of glucose (a good thing, in that it actually helps keep blood sugar levels under control) it also helps cells become less insulin-resistant, basically reversing the damage to cells caused by hyperinsulinemia. In addition, in the absence of glucose, stevia does not cause elevated insulin levels. (ref in next comment)

116d23135449332a8bf9106220cf632b
0 · June 11, 2011 at 1:03 AM

+1 to EatMoreBBQ for the "pinch of salt" and chili pepper- I use cayenne and it definitely takes cocoa to a new level!

Fe2c4b225ba3ec955e2a514badf7e61e
0 · May 15, 2011 at 12:29 AM

Not exactly the same thing, but the idea of artificial sweeteners causing insulin release is covered nicely here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/artificial-sweeteners-insulin/ Also, I find this meme somewhat annoying. Even if a sweet taste did cause insulin release, quantity matters - is it significant? Enough sweet to offset bitter is a totally different sweet than what you might get from a soft drink, for instance.

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
0 · May 20, 2010 at 2:54 PM

And I posit exactly that: ANY sweetener you find that has no insulin response is going to be all sorts of bad for you, **nutritionally**. It's not just about reenactment, I'm bothered by the fact that you consider fruit to be bad, and cocoa powder good.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:11 PM

I'll look for those, we have a cost plus not too far from here

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:10 PM

I'm not in it for reenactment solely for health/nutrition but pulling the family along means food must taste good and some comforts must be maintained or replaced

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:07 PM

I had totally forgotten carob and carob chips thanks!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:07 PM

Thanks I'll look for creamed coconut so many things just aren't in stores sadly

2ac40062935f569c9a86493f7177d2a0
0 · May 20, 2010 at 12:35 PM

If you're looking for flavor, some of the traditional Mexican hot chocolate recipes also include chili powder along with the cinnamon. I've also had a spicy hot chocolate that included some heat in the flavor profile; I'm guessing there was little cayenne pepper with the child powder. If you try this, then go with the freshest child powder you can find. Penzey's has a fresh ancho child powder that has some depth, but it's best to experiment. Finally, a very light pinch of sea salt may also bring more flavor to the party.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208
0 · May 19, 2010 at 7:56 PM

Anise and cloves are my two favs...

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13
0 · May 19, 2010 at 7:02 PM

@Aaron Griffin -- Gonna disagree with you here. Paleo is NOT about paleo re-enactment. It is about duplicating the evolutionary metabolic milieu. Butter is a "Neolithic" food, but very "Paleo". Read this: http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2010/3/28/the-only-reasonable-paleo-principle.html

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
0 · May 19, 2010 at 6:19 PM

If this is true, I'd just consider sweetened cocoa a treat and consume it accordingly and use unsweetened as a savory flavoring. Acting on my own suggestion is another issue altogether, for one of my favorite cold weather beverages is half a 82% bar melted in half and half. Indulgent for sure.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 6:05 PM

I'll check out anise

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 5:22 PM

Sadly I think you're right

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
0 · May 19, 2010 at 5:21 PM

It's also not magically bad because the HFCS "studies" has convinced you that fructose is the devil. The paleo diet is NOT about nutritionism. It's about eating what is natural. Fruit is natural. Cocoa powder requires processing to create. You have this backwards

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 3:55 PM

Fruit is the easy fix, what I'm looking for is more flavor in my arsenal

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 3:54 PM

Trying to avoid the sugar crash that fruits give me, the fructose in fruit isn't magical, it's still fructose

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 3:53 PM

Mint is good, I'll have to consider that as another flavoring would override the cocoa flavor a good bit however

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16 Answers

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895
5
1932 · May 19, 2010 at 5:02 PM

As I understand it, the actual problem is that the "taste" of sweet causes insulin to be secreted in anticipation of sugar. So, what you are asking is actually impossible. You want your cocoa to taste sweet without tasting sweet, i.e. you want your cocoa to taste sweet without any insulin to be secreted. (For the record - I DO TOO!! So I am in total sympathy.) For the record, coconut and cinnamon are both reasonably carby, (depending of course on your definition of "carby") so they could also cause a secretion of insulin as well.

The latest research indicates that all sweeteners cause this insulin secretion. I wish it were otherwise, but it appears that if you insist that your food taste sweet, you must accept what comes with it....a secretion of insulin.

If this is not true, I'd sure like to hear about it!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:36 AM

Sydney, that's a cool list, but he didn't even address xylitol!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:17 AM

This is totally reasonable. The sweet receptors in the toungue and pancreas effect insulin release.

Fe2c4b225ba3ec955e2a514badf7e61e
0 · May 15, 2011 at 12:29 AM

Not exactly the same thing, but the idea of artificial sweeteners causing insulin release is covered nicely here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/artificial-sweeteners-insulin/ Also, I find this meme somewhat annoying. Even if a sweet taste did cause insulin release, quantity matters - is it significant? Enough sweet to offset bitter is a totally different sweet than what you might get from a soft drink, for instance.

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
0 · May 19, 2010 at 6:19 PM

If this is true, I'd just consider sweetened cocoa a treat and consume it accordingly and use unsweetened as a savory flavoring. Acting on my own suggestion is another issue altogether, for one of my favorite cold weather beverages is half a 82% bar melted in half and half. Indulgent for sure.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 5:22 PM

Sadly I think you're right

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208
2
13993 · May 19, 2010 at 5:28 PM

You might try dehydrating and crushing the following:

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208
0 · May 19, 2010 at 7:56 PM

Anise and cloves are my two favs...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 6:05 PM

I'll check out anise

8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c
2
2517 · May 19, 2010 at 5:11 PM

This is a hard question -- one heck of a good stumper.

To make sure I'm reading it right, you're trying to sweeten cocoa powder without any of the standard "easy answers." Fruit (specifically berries) was my first thought, but you 86'ed the notion of using fruit.

Pieter is right when he mentions fat -- whereas fat isn't normally sweet, it's got that "smooth" characteristic that would downplay the lack of sweetness of your primary ingredient.

My one thought from personal experimentation would be bacon fat. HOWEVER: I don't know in what context you're using cocoa powder. Normally in my work, we'd dissolve cocoa powder into something else (i.e. cocoa into simple sugar syrup for a chocolate sorbet) -- or we'd dust chocolate truffles with a mix of cocoa powder and confectioner's sugar.

How are you looking to use the cocoa powder? My only thought so far is that you'd be using it to accent something else, versus having it be the accented ingredient.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e
2
10294 · May 19, 2010 at 3:43 PM

I find that fat usually helps to make it tastier, kind of sweeter, but not really sweeter. If you know what I mean ;-). Favourites are butter and coconut oil. Full fat (greek) yoghurt is also quite ok.

5c932956808ee61f6be6f594fce1b09f
2
20 · May 19, 2010 at 3:26 PM

crushed mint leaves? Cinnamon is a given, I combine them frequently. With mint. I'll be checking back to see what others say for sure!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 3:53 PM

Mint is good, I'll have to consider that as another flavoring would override the cocoa flavor a good bit however

Fa31aa9f354625c33c0807379c584d65
1
338 · September 08, 2012 at 3:24 AM

Try vanilla. Take it from the pros. Take a look at the ingredients of one of Green and Black's 85% cacao bars. This is by far the sweetest tasting bar I've found with that high of cocoa content.

8b02ef6dda8b8154c4185a2ac0883b09
1
175 · September 08, 2012 at 2:39 AM

Vanilla. It is naturally sweet.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:39 AM

agreed. natural liquid extracts like vanilla

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
1
7275 · September 08, 2012 at 12:20 AM

Licorice root/powerder makes things sweeter. I think it could go nicely with chocolate, in the right amount.

47762f401a46953098eeb5836482c016
1
10 · September 07, 2012 at 9:08 PM

My chocolate fix is easy:

in a bullet blender cup half filled with Ice 6-7 cubes 1/2 Cup lite Coconut Milk 2 Tablespoons Coca Powder 1 banana 10 filbert/hazelnuts (optional) but I like the nutty flavor it gives, reminds me of Frangelico liquor.

Blend til thick and creamy.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb
1
2254 · May 20, 2010 at 9:51 AM

Try cardamom - it's a fragrant spice traditionally used in baking and also in many indian (sweet and savoury) dishes. It's a got a warm, aromatic flavour, with a slight eukalyptus component. Goes great with coffee as well, incidentally.

Also, you mentioned coconut oil/flour - in case you haven't tried, there is also creamed coconut (i.e. very concentrated dessicated coconut) which has a lot of natural sweetness, and the combination with cocoa powder is beyond amazing.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:28 PM

If there is a Whole Foods near you, you can get creamed coconut as "Coconut Butter", in the raw-foods section in most Whole Foods stores. If not, you can order online. I like these folks when I have to purchase other-than-locally: http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/category/coconut-products-coconut-milk.php

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:07 PM

Thanks I'll look for creamed coconut so many things just aren't in stores sadly

29686e6867f73a7deee8bf0578cb2107
1
68 · May 20, 2010 at 5:05 AM

For what it's worth, I've found the 99% chocolate bars from Cost Plus World Imports to be quite tasty without any hint of overt sweetness, and at that percentage they have a truly minimal amount of sugar and a maximum amount of the "good stuff". A half-bar is something like 14g of sugar, of which half is fiber (presumably from the cocoa nibs themselves, which add a bit of crunchiness). I don't know how they make this bar so satisfying, since I've actually tried nibbling at 100% baking chocolate bars and -- no surprise -- they're basically inedible.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:11 PM

I'll look for those, we have a cost plus not too far from here

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
1
78417 · May 19, 2010 at 3:49 PM

First off, it appears you're trying to concoct non-paleo foods from paleo foods. You'll be much happier if you stop these Franken-disasters.

That said, if you're trying to make something sweet with cocoa powder, you need to start with something that has its OWN sweetener already - fruit.

For smoothies, try banana, avocado, cocoa powder, and some ice/water. You can also skip the ice/water part and just make a pudding.

The only place you should be getting "sweet" is from fruit. There is nothing else natural. I have no idea why you stipulated "no fruit" but you want to make something sweet without fruit - that's no longer paleo

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:18 AM

I personally think the jury is totally out on whether stevia is safe, regardless of its impact on insulin.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:14 AM

As for "natural", so is sassafras (which contains the most potent carcinogen known to man), datura, deadly nightshade berries, the coca leaf, the opium poppy and tobacco. I am not sure why people confuse natural for safe.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:12 AM

I have once read in some holistic database that stevia is anti-insulin like cinnamon and some other herbs (and its scientifically established that honey has insulin-like chemicals), so its within the realms of the possible that overall theres little effect

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 1:51 AM

^ Seeing as the insulin level significance is being compared to aspartame at the same caloric level (with a meal). Which has the sweeter taste/calorie? That BTW IMO doesnt say that stevia does induce insulin, only that it does produce significant insulin, with a meal, next to the same caloric amount of aspartame, and a higher caloric level of sucrose (with a meal). To infer something from that, id need more info.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:26 PM

Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels Stephen D. Anton, Ph.D., Corby K. Martin, Ph.D., Hongmei Han, M.S., Sandra Coulon, B.A., William T. Cefalu, M.D., Paula Geiselman, Ph.D., and Donald A. Williamson, Ph.D. Appetite Volume 55, Issue 1, August 2010, Pages 37-43 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666310000826

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d
0 · October 24, 2011 at 3:25 PM

I'm going to disagree with this. I grow my own stevia, and use the dried leaves or an alcohol extract for sweetening. It's completely natural, as long as you stick to either the extract version or the whole-leaf version. In addition, while it does stimulate insulin in the presence of glucose (a good thing, in that it actually helps keep blood sugar levels under control) it also helps cells become less insulin-resistant, basically reversing the damage to cells caused by hyperinsulinemia. In addition, in the absence of glucose, stevia does not cause elevated insulin levels. (ref in next comment)

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
0 · May 20, 2010 at 2:54 PM

And I posit exactly that: ANY sweetener you find that has no insulin response is going to be all sorts of bad for you, **nutritionally**. It's not just about reenactment, I'm bothered by the fact that you consider fruit to be bad, and cocoa powder good.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:10 PM

I'm not in it for reenactment solely for health/nutrition but pulling the family along means food must taste good and some comforts must be maintained or replaced

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13
0 · May 19, 2010 at 7:02 PM

@Aaron Griffin -- Gonna disagree with you here. Paleo is NOT about paleo re-enactment. It is about duplicating the evolutionary metabolic milieu. Butter is a "Neolithic" food, but very "Paleo". Read this: http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2010/3/28/the-only-reasonable-paleo-principle.html

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
0 · May 19, 2010 at 5:21 PM

It's also not magically bad because the HFCS "studies" has convinced you that fructose is the devil. The paleo diet is NOT about nutritionism. It's about eating what is natural. Fruit is natural. Cocoa powder requires processing to create. You have this backwards

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 19, 2010 at 3:54 PM

Trying to avoid the sugar crash that fruits give me, the fructose in fruit isn't magical, it's still fructose

42c414813b1ae734ba54c6208296c008
0
0 · November 28, 2012 at 1:29 PM

A word about carob...it is a leguminose so it isn't paleo.

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0
143 · September 08, 2012 at 3:16 AM

Coconut sugar. Not palm sugar. Coconut sugar has a low glycimic index and is full of nutrients. It's not refiend like most stevia and other sweeteners. It's sap collected from the blossoms of the coconut tree. This is then boiled down to make a dry product which can come in a block or granular form. It's one of the most sustainable sweetners not to mention very environmentally friendly. It's slow releasing so you wont get that weird sugar high. It's used 1:1 to granular cane sugar so its super easy to use as a replacement in recipes calling for cane sugar. It has a nice mellow caramel aroma and taste. Might not technically be paleo but its the only sweetener i feel comfortable using.

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 5:02 AM

Im a big hippie so i like the fact that it creates jobs for those less fortunate while keeping their habitat intact http://www.noble-house.tk/html/engels/Gamma_brochure/Fairworld_coconut_blossom_sugar.html

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:47 AM

*food. Omg, what insomnia can do to a brain!!! It's probably damaged from all the coconut sugar i eat, hahahaha!!

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:45 AM

*single not sungle :)

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b
0 · September 08, 2012 at 4:44 AM

It's only possibly damaging to your liver if over consumed. In my case that would't happen since i use maybe 2tbs a week, if that. It's another mass hysteria thing. I bet you'll find every sungle foid has something that could be potentially harmful.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9
0 · September 08, 2012 at 3:39 AM

coconut sugar has a low GI because it has a lot of fructose, which causes a lot of stress for the liver just like agave nectar

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad
0
4266 · September 07, 2012 at 10:40 PM

I sometimes use cocoa powder to make little cupcakes in coffee cups. Ingredients are mashed banana, coconut or almond butter, egg and cocoa. 2 minutes in the microwave. Two cupcakes. (I make this as a treat to try to show my non-paleo boyfriend that paleo food can be a fun treat sometimes, too.) It tastes sweeter if I put a square of super dark chocolate in the middle of the cupcake. Something about the melted fat maybe. Not knowing what you are doing with your cocoa powder, perhaps you just need to add fat.

7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04
0
514 · May 20, 2010 at 7:43 AM

Maybe this is off topic, but your question made me think of carob, have you considered it in place of chocolate?

I searched the archives and saw that a week ago, Dee wrote this in response to another question:

I like carob- for me it tastes like sweet light chocolate. I think advantages are that it contains no stimulants, so can drink at night, and that it is sweet without adding sugar, plus it won't kill your dog and is a decent substitute for those allergic or sensitive to chocolate. I mix it with milk or cream and drink it like hot chocolate. I don't add anything else.

Could be a good option if you don't find a way to sweeten cocoa w/o fruit.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5
0 · September 08, 2012 at 2:26 AM

Carob is very sugary, even unsweetened. Then they sweeten it more to make it into the familiar food you know.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
0 · May 20, 2010 at 1:07 PM

I had totally forgotten carob and carob chips thanks!

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