8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
1

Have you stopped donating time and/or money to conventional wisdom medical projects?

by (6229)
Updated about 21 hours ago
Created April 20, 2012 at 3:25 AM

So after learning about ancestral lifestyle and health and watching the Burzynski movie, the hubby and I've stopped donating to conventional non-profits like American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, etc. because they are mouthpiece for conventional wisdom and the pharmaceutical companies. We have also stopped participating in Walkathons for cancer, autoimmune diseases (like MS) etc.

We would rather give my money and/or time to ancestral efforts/projects/research.

Anyone else have this similar experience?

When friends and family try to ask for donations for these causes, what do you tell them?

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · September 07, 2013 at 1:28 AM

I have nothing against support groups - I think they are great for ANYONE. But when they start preaching whole grains, low-fat, and getting financial support from Big Pharma, and treat everyone like a victim - like it's not their fault they are eating 3 cokes plus donuts then there is a problem.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 9:04 PM

And re Terry Wahls - people like her are sometimes the lucky ones. I stand by my statement to read my friend with MS the riot act about her diet. Go check her fridge, I dare you. Sometimes shit just happens and it's not always fixable with diet. I am really glad that someone is looking at MRIs of the brains of folks like her and studying how and why this happens.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 9:01 PM

I know about Terry Wahls, I wouldn't be caught dead buying something pink to benefit Susan G Komen, and I think American society is making itself sick. STILL. I'm just trying to make a point about the sheer privilege we have, and how we need to be a bit sensitive. There are TONS of organizations that are doing genetic or pharmaceutical research that we shouldn't turn our noses up at. TONS of scientists toil away unrecognized and not every nonprofit has a bloated administrative budget. Let's just not come across as snotty and holier than thou.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:19 PM

*within just one illness. @Lady, I never said it was all genetic. And some diseases are MUCH more driven than lifestyle than others...diabetes is hardly existent in other countries. The only point I've been trying to make is that nutrition doesn't solve everything and it's not fair to assume that illness trajectory was the individual's fault.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:15 PM

There are also real cases where people just claim they "prayed to God" and then magically recover. I'm not going to take that as a sign that I should start going to church.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:14 PM

She is one success story. There is a lot of diversity within the she illness. Of course the ones that succeed with paleo are going to speak about it. How do you know for sure that there aren't hundreds of sick people going through cancer, trying desperately to eat paleo to cure their rapidly dying bodies? They, of course, aren't preaching about it. Not saying paleo doesn't work, but I don't take small case studies and focus on them.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:12 PM

The pay of the CEOs are going to be higher. Of course, just like every other top organization in the country. Top organizations need to attract talent, and in order to attract the "best" they need to have great incentives. How much do you think Dr. Kruse makes? Mark Sisson? Dr. Oz?!! They make FAR and away, much more than the typical doctor/person and the reason that they are being paid more is because they have the credentials, education and personalities to get the attention. And what does the bad of one organization have anything to do with the mission of other organizations?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:07 PM

@Karen, I am not saying that it is completely genetics. Rather, I am saying that you have to look at illness from a multifaceted approach. Perhaps we are just arguing over certain illness. Diabetes and other illnesses are by FAR, make much more sense to control from a prevention perspective than say, Neurofibromatosis.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:03 PM

They also advocate for prevention and lifestyle changes as well.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 6:40 PM

Dr. Terry Wahls, MD cures herself of MS multiple sclerosis autoimmune disease from wheelchair after 7 years of the conventional treatment. In 1 year of dietary change (Paleo) she could ride a bike! 17 min TedEx talk. http://www.foodrenegade.com/reversing-ms-through-dietary-changes/

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:45 PM

any you can recommend?

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:02 PM

Breast cancer approaching 1 in 3, and prostrate cancer 1 in 2 cannot be genetic - there are environmental and lifestyle factors responsible for that kind of issue. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36032749/ns/health-womens_health/t/breast-cancer-cases-may-be-avoidable/#.T5GIRLNSSWg

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:00 PM

Sunny Beaches - Dr. Deans advocates an ancestral lifestyle for mental illness, of course drugs are used (but often reduced and/or eliminated) when proper nutrition and supplements are used. Nora Gedgaudas also wrote Primal Body, Primal Mind - an excellent book on mental health. http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:20 PM

I also just want to add that I see a lot of folks pointing out genetics here. We don't understand this stuff yet. Genetics is not destiny. It is merely a map of what's possible, but it cannot tell you if, when, or how a disease will manifest. Yes, genetics is huge, but to throw our hands in the air and say, "It's just my genes" is a big misunderstanding of how it all works.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:18 PM

syrahna, I just want to point out that I don't think anyone is pointing fingers at those with disease. But many of these organizations (SGK, Livestrong, etc.) are bloated and mismanage the funds they are given. For example, SGK has numerous execs with salaries of 300K and above, and they spend a million dollars a year suing smaller charities for the use of the word "cure" in their title. THAT is unconscionable and hard to support with my dollars.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:14 PM

Wow, awesome link Dragonfly. I always dread October and having pink shoved down my throat.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 1:56 PM

Mutations happened millions of years ago, and evolution supports it. Some animals grew to certain heights, some were stronger, some were weaker (and this affected how they thrived) and they "ate a natural diet." If we neglect the fact that we can't prevent all illness, then are we saying that only the genetically strong should be able to prolong their lives?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 1:55 PM

Some genes, despite environment and nutrition will express themselves. Blue eyes? Red hair? Nobody would argue that those genes are environmentally driven. I have a genetic disorder that is from a parent, just like hair color or eye color. Nutrition and environment had NOTHING to do with it. I don't think the argument here is that there is no use for "ancestral research". Rather, I want to push the issue that from a purely biological standpoint, genetic mutations and "flaws" happen, no matter how well you eat and how clean your air is.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:23 AM

Agreed< Karen. I wish more people would read this: http://butterbeliever.com/2011/10/22/i-will-not-be-pinkwashed-why-i-do-not-support-susan-g-komen-for-the-cure/

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:14 AM

I have lost 2 (younger) cousins to preventable Type II diabetes-related complications--not to mention seeing my sister go through thyroid & breast cancer--so yes, this question hits home for ME.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:12 AM

And just because we can't heal *everything* with diet, should we ignore the millions of people who would benefit from ancestral nutrition research?

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:06 AM

"There's nothing wrong with being a little communitarian and looking out for the greatest good for the greatest number of people." I agree. I think ancestral nutrition/vitamin D research will benefit more people in the long run than any research looking for a "pill" to cure the degenerative diseases that affect the masses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:05 AM

"There's nothing wrong with being a little communitarian and looking out for the greatest good for the greatest number of people." I agree. I think ancestral nutrition/vitamin D research will benefit *more* people in the long run than any research looking for a "pill" to cure the degenerative diseases that affect the masses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. For more Paleo Diet hacks: Have you stopped donating time and/or money to conventional wisdom medical projects? - PaleoHacks.com

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:00 AM

Don't forget that Prenatal nutrition/environment plays a huge role in gene expression. I support research that helps us identify what is physiologically optimal--and ancestral nutrition is a large part of that. I notice that as people get interested in their diet, they often pay more attention to environmental issues like BPA, etc. Personally, I prefer to support prevention rather than diagnosis/cure. And isn't it great that we all can choose where we put our money?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 5:03 AM

I love the paleo lifestyle, but it does worry that people overestimate the ability to control illness and disease. Genetic mutations do happen, even in animals in the wild. The American Heart Association supports research on congenital heart disease in infants. Infants! It would be heart-breaking to simply point a finger at the mom for not eating "well" enough because she could have prevented it with proper nutrition. Sometimes life happens, and it's not because we didn't eat organic apples. Mental illness is something else I worry about a lot here on this board. I'll save that for another day

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 4:52 AM

Ohkay. You can all tell that hit a bit close to home? I just want us all to remember our audience. I've got a good reminder every day when I bitch and moan about having a sore knee. I can freaking walk. I just don't want to be part of a movement that is making the perfect the enemy of the good at the expense of our most vulnerable folks.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 4:39 AM

YES. We shouldn't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. I want more women getting diagnosed quicker, and if that means supporting some conventional projects, so be it. There is a crap load of nuance between "conventional" and "ancestral".

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 4:19 AM

I don't think SGK will ever recover from the disaster from a month or so ago. I don't think it's wrong at all to think SGK is "evil" just because your mom had breast cancer. The pulling of funding had nothing to do with breast cancer itself. It was a politically driven mistake.

Total Views
503

Recent Activity
78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

Last Activity
67D AGO

Followers
0

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

5 Answers

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
3
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 3:53 AM

Often, there is still a genetic predisposition to cancer, heart disease, and other illnesses. Having BRCA (1,2) genes, for example, puts women at a much greater risk for being diagnosed with breast cancer...at birth, before anything has even had time to intervene. So even if she eats everything right, I don't think it would be fair to blame her for failing to control her body. Cancer research money led to the discovery of those factors so that women could be tested (if they wanted to) to understand their increased risk so that they could manage lifestyle factors, or in extreme cases, consider removing their breasts.

Environmental causes, such as radiation from natural disaster/war, etc. also play a role. At a high enough dose of say radiation, I think it would be difficult to try and control the affected through diet alone. I don't think diet alone will end cancer diagnoses.

I don't think those organizations are directly tied to pharmaceutical companies. True, they do tend to advocate for low-fat diets and adhere to other CW guidelines, but they also raise awareness, give advice about pre-cancer screenings, exercise, quitting smoking and offer hope to those who are already suffering. Prevention is great (if you are interested in ancestral approaches), but I have doubts that diet alone will save someone who is in stage 3 and hoping for a cure.

Organizations like that aren't only interested in the cure. They also invest in understanding the interplay between biological causes, emotional reactions (I worked on a breast cancer research project investigating family members of those diagnosed) in the affected and their family members, and environmental causes (e.g. BPA). They do tests on cortisol and recovery rates, how social support affects recovery, etc. It is much more than just the body.

I guess I'm not sure what you mean by "conventional" non-profits. Organizations like that also give survivors a chance to celebrate life through walks and meeting others.

I may be biased because I used to run with a children's brain tumor foundation. The organization also raised money to have an author write a book for young children confused about their medical condition, sent children with illnesses to special summer camps for those who couldn't afford it, and in general, gave parents a chance to meet eachother through walks and socialize and connect. There's a community element to many non-profits. It's not just about the "biology" behind things.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:03 PM

They also advocate for prevention and lifestyle changes as well.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 1:56 PM

Mutations happened millions of years ago, and evolution supports it. Some animals grew to certain heights, some were stronger, some were weaker (and this affected how they thrived) and they "ate a natural diet." If we neglect the fact that we can't prevent all illness, then are we saying that only the genetically strong should be able to prolong their lives?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 1:55 PM

Some genes, despite environment and nutrition will express themselves. Blue eyes? Red hair? Nobody would argue that those genes are environmentally driven. I have a genetic disorder that is from a parent, just like hair color or eye color. Nutrition and environment had NOTHING to do with it. I don't think the argument here is that there is no use for "ancestral research". Rather, I want to push the issue that from a purely biological standpoint, genetic mutations and "flaws" happen, no matter how well you eat and how clean your air is.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:00 AM

Don't forget that Prenatal nutrition/environment plays a huge role in gene expression. I support research that helps us identify what is physiologically optimal--and ancestral nutrition is a large part of that. I notice that as people get interested in their diet, they often pay more attention to environmental issues like BPA, etc. Personally, I prefer to support prevention rather than diagnosis/cure. And isn't it great that we all can choose where we put our money?

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 4:39 AM

YES. We shouldn't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. I want more women getting diagnosed quicker, and if that means supporting some conventional projects, so be it. There is a crap load of nuance between "conventional" and "ancestral".

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · September 07, 2013 at 1:28 AM

I have nothing against support groups - I think they are great for ANYONE. But when they start preaching whole grains, low-fat, and getting financial support from Big Pharma, and treat everyone like a victim - like it's not their fault they are eating 3 cokes plus donuts then there is a problem.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 4:50 AM

I am kind of put off by this post and the way you're stating it, and I want you to know why, because I am sure you don't mean to come off like this.

It sounds like you're walking around with plenty of class privilege. Sure, give your money to causes with integrity, and honor your own integrity, but geez - I can't help but wonder - you want to come look someone like my husband in the eye and say you're not going to donate to the Muscular Dystrophy Association because it's not progressive enough in supporting nutrition for the gimp masses, when he & his peers didn't do a damn thing to earn being born with a severe genetic quirk? And seriously, MS? It seems to me the more you know about nutrition and light (rather ancestral concepts) the more you'd be behind the cutting edge research on MS. There's a reason it's so prevalent in the Pacific Northwest. And if you want to come look my good buddy in the face and tell her that you think the scientists who are giving her longer and better quality of life with their (conventional, FDA approved) pills are not a good use of your money, go ahead. I don't want to get decked.

There's nothing wrong with being a little communitarian and looking out for the greatest good for the greatest number of people - or just keeping in mind that you're damn lucky to have the education and ability to direct your resources according to your pet interests.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:06 AM

"There's nothing wrong with being a little communitarian and looking out for the greatest good for the greatest number of people." I agree. I think ancestral nutrition/vitamin D research will benefit more people in the long run than any research looking for a "pill" to cure the degenerative diseases that affect the masses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:02 PM

Breast cancer approaching 1 in 3, and prostrate cancer 1 in 2 cannot be genetic - there are environmental and lifestyle factors responsible for that kind of issue. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36032749/ns/health-womens_health/t/breast-cancer-cases-may-be-avoidable/#.T5GIRLNSSWg

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:18 PM

syrahna, I just want to point out that I don't think anyone is pointing fingers at those with disease. But many of these organizations (SGK, Livestrong, etc.) are bloated and mismanage the funds they are given. For example, SGK has numerous execs with salaries of 300K and above, and they spend a million dollars a year suing smaller charities for the use of the word "cure" in their title. THAT is unconscionable and hard to support with my dollars.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 5:03 AM

I love the paleo lifestyle, but it does worry that people overestimate the ability to control illness and disease. Genetic mutations do happen, even in animals in the wild. The American Heart Association supports research on congenital heart disease in infants. Infants! It would be heart-breaking to simply point a finger at the mom for not eating "well" enough because she could have prevented it with proper nutrition. Sometimes life happens, and it's not because we didn't eat organic apples. Mental illness is something else I worry about a lot here on this board. I'll save that for another day

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:19 PM

*within just one illness. @Lady, I never said it was all genetic. And some diseases are MUCH more driven than lifestyle than others...diabetes is hardly existent in other countries. The only point I've been trying to make is that nutrition doesn't solve everything and it's not fair to assume that illness trajectory was the individual's fault.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:14 AM

I have lost 2 (younger) cousins to preventable Type II diabetes-related complications--not to mention seeing my sister go through thyroid & breast cancer--so yes, this question hits home for ME.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:20 PM

I also just want to add that I see a lot of folks pointing out genetics here. We don't understand this stuff yet. Genetics is not destiny. It is merely a map of what's possible, but it cannot tell you if, when, or how a disease will manifest. Yes, genetics is huge, but to throw our hands in the air and say, "It's just my genes" is a big misunderstanding of how it all works.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 9:01 PM

I know about Terry Wahls, I wouldn't be caught dead buying something pink to benefit Susan G Komen, and I think American society is making itself sick. STILL. I'm just trying to make a point about the sheer privilege we have, and how we need to be a bit sensitive. There are TONS of organizations that are doing genetic or pharmaceutical research that we shouldn't turn our noses up at. TONS of scientists toil away unrecognized and not every nonprofit has a bloated administrative budget. Let's just not come across as snotty and holier than thou.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 6:40 PM

Dr. Terry Wahls, MD cures herself of MS multiple sclerosis autoimmune disease from wheelchair after 7 years of the conventional treatment. In 1 year of dietary change (Paleo) she could ride a bike! 17 min TedEx talk. http://www.foodrenegade.com/reversing-ms-through-dietary-changes/

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:05 AM

"There's nothing wrong with being a little communitarian and looking out for the greatest good for the greatest number of people." I agree. I think ancestral nutrition/vitamin D research will benefit *more* people in the long run than any research looking for a "pill" to cure the degenerative diseases that affect the masses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. For more Paleo Diet hacks: Have you stopped donating time and/or money to conventional wisdom medical projects? - PaleoHacks.com

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 4:52 AM

Ohkay. You can all tell that hit a bit close to home? I just want us all to remember our audience. I've got a good reminder every day when I bitch and moan about having a sore knee. I can freaking walk. I just don't want to be part of a movement that is making the perfect the enemy of the good at the expense of our most vulnerable folks.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:07 PM

@Karen, I am not saying that it is completely genetics. Rather, I am saying that you have to look at illness from a multifaceted approach. Perhaps we are just arguing over certain illness. Diabetes and other illnesses are by FAR, make much more sense to control from a prevention perspective than say, Neurofibromatosis.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:12 AM

And just because we can't heal *everything* with diet, should we ignore the millions of people who would benefit from ancestral nutrition research?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:14 PM

She is one success story. There is a lot of diversity within the she illness. Of course the ones that succeed with paleo are going to speak about it. How do you know for sure that there aren't hundreds of sick people going through cancer, trying desperately to eat paleo to cure their rapidly dying bodies? They, of course, aren't preaching about it. Not saying paleo doesn't work, but I don't take small case studies and focus on them.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:00 PM

Sunny Beaches - Dr. Deans advocates an ancestral lifestyle for mental illness, of course drugs are used (but often reduced and/or eliminated) when proper nutrition and supplements are used. Nora Gedgaudas also wrote Primal Body, Primal Mind - an excellent book on mental health. http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:12 PM

The pay of the CEOs are going to be higher. Of course, just like every other top organization in the country. Top organizations need to attract talent, and in order to attract the "best" they need to have great incentives. How much do you think Dr. Kruse makes? Mark Sisson? Dr. Oz?!! They make FAR and away, much more than the typical doctor/person and the reason that they are being paid more is because they have the credentials, education and personalities to get the attention. And what does the bad of one organization have anything to do with the mission of other organizations?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 7:15 PM

There are also real cases where people just claim they "prayed to God" and then magically recover. I'm not going to take that as a sign that I should start going to church.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa
2417 · April 20, 2012 at 9:04 PM

And re Terry Wahls - people like her are sometimes the lucky ones. I stand by my statement to read my friend with MS the riot act about her diet. Go check her fridge, I dare you. Sometimes shit just happens and it's not always fixable with diet. I am really glad that someone is looking at MRIs of the brains of folks like her and studying how and why this happens.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
2
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 4:13 AM

Yeah, I have a real hard time donating to friends for their various cycles and runs and walks and such. But I try to think of it as supporting them, not the organization. It's not really a conversation I'm willing to have with them because I'm not about to get into why I think SGK is evil when their own mother survived breast cancer.

And I balance it out by trying to give to things I find worthwhile. I'm eyeballing the Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587
7660 · April 20, 2012 at 3:14 PM

Wow, awesome link Dragonfly. I always dread October and having pink shoved down my throat.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 10:23 AM

Agreed< Karen. I wish more people would read this: http://butterbeliever.com/2011/10/22/i-will-not-be-pinkwashed-why-i-do-not-support-susan-g-komen-for-the-cure/

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b
5509 · April 20, 2012 at 4:19 AM

I don't think SGK will ever recover from the disaster from a month or so ago. I don't think it's wrong at all to think SGK is "evil" just because your mom had breast cancer. The pulling of funding had nothing to do with breast cancer itself. It was a politically driven mistake.

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7
2
4295 · April 20, 2012 at 4:00 AM

After seeing several cancer charities fund raising by selling sugary junk food, I've completely stopped supporting charities like this.

I'd much rather donate my time to worthwhile organisations and try to raise as much awareness as possible about the importance of good nutrition.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e
6229 · April 20, 2012 at 4:45 PM

any you can recommend?

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
1
32518 · April 20, 2012 at 3:34 AM

Yep.

In the past, I have support MS Walkathons and Breast Cancer charities.

This year I will be donating to the Vitamin D Council.

Fortunately, the only thing my family has solicited me for was Girl Scout cookies. I simply ignored the FaceBook posts--they know I am gluten-free... :-)

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account

Get Free Paleo Recipes