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Can I do strength exercises every day?

by (2065)
Updated about 1 hour ago
Created July 31, 2010 at 9:13 PM

I have always heard you should never do strength training/weight lifting every day, but should give a day or two in between. I am a beginner (still can't do one real push up). I have been doing against the counter push ups, using a resistance band to do pull up type movements, lifting some 15 lb weights and doing squats (no weights) and lunges. My question is b/c I am such a beginner, can I for example do push ups and pull ups every day or is this in any way detrimental? My common sense tells me that if my muscles aren't overly fatigued then it's o.k. but I want to be safe and nice to my body! I am eager to make quick progress b/c I am hoping to start work on a farm soon and need to be in great shape. Thanks!

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1398 · July 03, 2013 at 1:38 AM

Doing bodyweight exercises every day is so far from overtraining it's laughable.

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289 · February 22, 2013 at 1:32 PM

YES you can http://www.notyouraveragefitnesstips.com/best-workout-routines/grease-the-groove-how-to-increase-pushups-increase-pull-ups don't train to failure

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25467 · February 21, 2011 at 2:44 AM

can you yes.........simple. But I think you really wanted to know should you.......the answer is no. The reason is your pituitary and adrenal gland functions dont respond maximmaly if you do. See Williams endocrinology for the long answer.

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2065 · August 02, 2010 at 11:09 PM

Thanks JP, I really appreciate your help.

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2065 · August 02, 2010 at 3:56 PM

Thanks for clearing that up for me Chris.

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1973 · August 02, 2010 at 2:55 PM

@Hannah: intensity is generally used to describe how heavy the weights are relative to the maximum weight you can use. For example if you can deadlift 100kg for 1 rep, then using a weight over 85-90kg would be considered 'high intensity'. 70-85kg moderate intensity, less weight would be low intensity.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:22 PM

@Hannah, it's definitely a good idea to add farmer walks.. Especially if you add them to a routine that has pushups, pullups, and squats. I wish you good luck and if anything, feel free to contact me.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:20 PM

@Ken, This is why short and intense strength sessions will prepare her. Improving maximal strength is the only way to go IMO. And, by the way, I have a farm.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:20 PM

@Ken, Deadlift is a great excercise because it does work the back but it also works the lats. There is nothing wrong with using a move that is lat dominant. I don't ignore the context of her situation. If I followed your logic, I would have to make her train 8-10 hours DAILY to prepare her for the real thing. I suggested training 20-30mins so she gets used to the tensions. Yes, working on a farm is quite hard sometimes but it's not like you are near maximum effort constantly.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:39 PM

Thanks JP that does help. Ambimorph- Ok so does low volume mean the amount of reps I do, frequency is how many days I work out and intensity is how heavy or how fast?? Sorry, I am new to these terms.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:31 PM

I'll definitely be adding the farmers walk too.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:28 PM

Hi, Thanks Ken. I do see your point and I'm not sure anything will prepare me for farm work except the work itself :) However, I do need upper body strength and push ups and pull ups are great for that right? I'm definitely doing some pull up type moves with bands that are targeting my lower back + floor exercises for the core. @JP- I think you are right that b/c I am a beginner these exercises are a good start. My back seems to get a good workout when I do pull-ups and push ups but maybe I will eventually need to do extra work with my back.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 6:05 PM

@JP As far as pushups, it is the abs that prevent the midsection from falling to the floor. Your lower back muscles are probably activated more by leaning forward over the key board while typing.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 6:01 PM

@JP Unfortunately, you continue to ignore the context of her situation by talking about general training, which will not prepare her very well for *farm work*. That will entail long hours, hardly ever involve the lats, etc., and you can't alternate days off. You are answering her subject line but not the actual situation. Also, do you see that 20 min x 4 days /week is not the same thing as 8-10 hours, 5 days per week? Lat strength will be irrelevant on a job. If you continue to insist that pullups develop lower back, I don't know what to say. You can also insist that the sun is blue.

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1973 · August 01, 2010 at 5:47 PM

Kinesiology student or not, pullups and pushups do not put anywhere near the stress on "the core" that the various deadlift variants do. Suggesting otherwise is highly misleading.

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1973 · August 01, 2010 at 7:42 AM

Working a 'muscle' more than 1-2 times per week does not constitute overtraining. Domer88 is discussing classic bodybuilding splits. On a farm you're likely to be doing some of the same exercises every day.

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18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:05 AM

Pushups and pullups are compound exercises. Of course they develop your back muscles.

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18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:01 AM

To be clear, it is fine to train to failure (in fact many recommend it), but you cannot do that every day. The more intense the lifting, the more rest you will need, and the more effective it will be. So choose either high volume, high frequency and low intensity, or low volume, low frequency and high intensity. In my opinion, the former is a waste of time.

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18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:01 AM

To be clear, it is fine to train to failure (in fact many recommend it), but you cannot do that every day. The more intense the lifting, the more rest you will need, and the more effective it will be. So choose either high volume, high frequency and low intensity, or low volume, low intensity and high intensity. In my opinion, the former is a waste of time.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:14 AM

Forgot to say how they develop lower back strength. Pullups work the back (obviously the core prevents the legs from ''falling''). Pushups is a no brainer. It's done in a plank position so that should tell you how good it is for the core. Once you master the basics, you move to something harder (L-pullups for instance)

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:14 AM

Forgot to say how they develop lower back strength. Pullups work the work (obviously the core prevents the legs from ''falling''). Pushups is a no brainer. It's done in a plank position so that should tell you how good it is for the core. Once you master the basics, you move to something harder (L-pullups for instance)

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:07 AM

Btw, I said Pushups AND pullups AND squat. Once you master the basics, and you start to work on harder variations, you will find out how great they are for all your body. Just youtube Bar-barians or bar stylers if you disagree. Calisthenics are a great tool for strength. I'm sorry you disagree with me, but I happen to be a kinesiology student and I will stick with what I learned (and works for me).

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:06 AM

Ken, strength is about nervous system adaption. You have to adapt to tension. You dont need a huge amount of volume if you workout daily. For instance, I can do handstands or l-sit or 15 ring pullups (no real feat of strength btw) and I workout about 20 mins 4 times a week without ever going to failure. Keeping the volume low means doing enough volume to stimulate strength gains without frying the CNS. The actual amount will vary on the individual and his/her fitness levels.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 1:20 AM

How could you possibly think that pullups and pushups develop lower back?!? Huh? Besides, I have had actual physical jobs in construction, this is not just theory to me. Your advice to her above says to keep "low volume". How does that possibly fit in preparing for a farm job?

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 12:59 AM

Pullups and pushups will develop lower back strength. Especially since she is beginning. Add to that some leg work (squat) and she is all set, to be honest. I second that Farmer's walk is a great exercise.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 12:57 AM

hannah, going all out once in a great while is fine. But, you should not do it on a regular basis because it will make you overtrain (as well as other bad things) if you do it daily. I suggest testing yourself every 2-4 weeks to start. Strength is produced by the adaptation of the nervous system. if you fry your CNS too often, you make it ''burn''. It would be similar to a computer hard drive. Load it too much and it gets slow and sloppy. I always stop when I feel like I have 1-3 reps left in the tank. Hope that helps.

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1485 · July 31, 2010 at 11:40 PM

You can work out every day, but make sure you are working different muscles until they have had enough recovery time. So you can, for example, do "push" exercises, like your push-ups, on Monday and Thursday, and your "pull" exercises on Tuesday and Saturday. There are lots of ways to arrange things, depending on how many exercises you are doing.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:22 PM

Thanks JP, that's helpful. So, do you mean I should never ever push until I can't go any longer with any exercise? I thought you were supposed to really "feel the burn" until you collapse in a sweaty heap! Hmmm...I have much to learn.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:09 PM

Yes, I was thinking about alternating days with lower body one day and upper the next, but I don't know how "natural" that is. I look forward to the day when I can do more heavy lifting and hopefully have shorter workouts. I feel like my workouts last a little too long b/c I do so many different exercises.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:02 PM

Thanks for your response, I'm a little confused though. You say I should not be working out the same muscle every day and one to two times a week is plenty, but that resistance training every day is o.k? Is that a contradiction or am I not understanding what you said? Thanks & sorry for being slow!

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551 · July 31, 2010 at 9:58 PM

Yes you can but keep the volume low (never going to failure). If the goal is to become strong, you should get used to the tension. You can definitely do that on a daily basis.

For instance, if you can't do a full pushup, you can work on holding the top position for a few seconds. Do the same with the bottom position. Add to this some incline pushups (hands higher than feet) and work slowly from there.

You should rotate the exercise you do (for instance, day 1 could be pushups, day 2 pullups, day 3 squats, and so on).

Again, never go to failure. It will be counter productive (no strength improvement, no muscle gain, etc.).

Once you build basic strength, I suggest you look into Grease the groove (GTG) if you want to keep training on a daily basis.

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2065 · August 02, 2010 at 3:56 PM

Thanks for clearing that up for me Chris.

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1973 · August 02, 2010 at 2:55 PM

@Hannah: intensity is generally used to describe how heavy the weights are relative to the maximum weight you can use. For example if you can deadlift 100kg for 1 rep, then using a weight over 85-90kg would be considered 'high intensity'. 70-85kg moderate intensity, less weight would be low intensity.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:39 PM

Thanks JP that does help. Ambimorph- Ok so does low volume mean the amount of reps I do, frequency is how many days I work out and intensity is how heavy or how fast?? Sorry, I am new to these terms.

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18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:01 AM

To be clear, it is fine to train to failure (in fact many recommend it), but you cannot do that every day. The more intense the lifting, the more rest you will need, and the more effective it will be. So choose either high volume, high frequency and low intensity, or low volume, low frequency and high intensity. In my opinion, the former is a waste of time.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1
18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:01 AM

To be clear, it is fine to train to failure (in fact many recommend it), but you cannot do that every day. The more intense the lifting, the more rest you will need, and the more effective it will be. So choose either high volume, high frequency and low intensity, or low volume, low intensity and high intensity. In my opinion, the former is a waste of time.

D5db204527668aa712504995c0f8f96f
551 · August 01, 2010 at 12:57 AM

hannah, going all out once in a great while is fine. But, you should not do it on a regular basis because it will make you overtrain (as well as other bad things) if you do it daily. I suggest testing yourself every 2-4 weeks to start. Strength is produced by the adaptation of the nervous system. if you fry your CNS too often, you make it ''burn''. It would be similar to a computer hard drive. Load it too much and it gets slow and sloppy. I always stop when I feel like I have 1-3 reps left in the tank. Hope that helps.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:22 PM

Thanks JP, that's helpful. So, do you mean I should never ever push until I can't go any longer with any exercise? I thought you were supposed to really "feel the burn" until you collapse in a sweaty heap! Hmmm...I have much to learn.

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1485 · July 31, 2010 at 9:39 PM

You shouldn't work the same muscle every day, even as a beginner. Muscle growth happens between workouts. But there is no issue with doing resistance training every day, especially if you enjoy it. And you are right that a beginner is likely to see faster gains early, so take advantage of it and get through that period quickly. If you go to www.exrx.net, you will find workout routines broken out into push-pull and other combinations, depending on how many days per week you work out, and how many days of rest you want.

Each muscle really only needs to be worked 1-2 times per week. More than that is overtraining and not allowing rebuilding to happen. It can seem like you are taking it easy, but it is an important element of progress.

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1398 · July 03, 2013 at 1:38 AM

Doing bodyweight exercises every day is so far from overtraining it's laughable.

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1973 · August 01, 2010 at 7:42 AM

Working a 'muscle' more than 1-2 times per week does not constitute overtraining. Domer88 is discussing classic bodybuilding splits. On a farm you're likely to be doing some of the same exercises every day.

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1485 · July 31, 2010 at 11:40 PM

You can work out every day, but make sure you are working different muscles until they have had enough recovery time. So you can, for example, do "push" exercises, like your push-ups, on Monday and Thursday, and your "pull" exercises on Tuesday and Saturday. There are lots of ways to arrange things, depending on how many exercises you are doing.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:02 PM

Thanks for your response, I'm a little confused though. You say I should not be working out the same muscle every day and one to two times a week is plenty, but that resistance training every day is o.k? Is that a contradiction or am I not understanding what you said? Thanks & sorry for being slow!

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2604 · August 01, 2010 at 1:13 PM

Can you? Yes. Is it optimal - depends on your goals. If you want to bulk up and or get good strength gains, intense workouts with several days off is ideal for most people. If you want all round fitness and moderat strength, it's fine to do moderate intensity workouts every day. Many armed forces regimes have quite heavy daily strength routines - bodyweight exercises especially.

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20787 · August 01, 2010 at 4:11 AM

How best to exercise is one of those hotly debated topics that one could go on about for months. But there are a few basics. First, muscle strengthening occurs after the exercise is over. What you do in the exercise is strain your muscles until weaker fibers break. Then you rest and during the resting time, new stronger fibers regrow to replace the old weak ones that you nuked during the exercise. You do not want to exercise that muscle again until that muscle is repaired. If you interrupt the repair process by overstraining that muscle again too soon, then you actually slow down your strength gaining and can also injure that muscle.

So that is why people are saying either keep your exercise light so that you don't strain the muscle too badly and it repairs quickly or if you do more intense exercise, make sure that you give more time to heal. One thing to look for is if the muscle is still sore from the last time you exercised, then you are not yet ready to work it again as it has not yet healed from the last time. Working the muscle too soon is counterproductive to rapid fitness and strength.

Another thing to consider is recovery time. An eighteen year old reasonably fit male may recover in two days. But a 40 year old female may need 4 or 5 days for muscles to fully recover after a hard workout. Let the soreness be your guide. Two days may not be enough time for recovery after intense workouts either.

Beyond that, I would say if you are very serious, then try to find exercises that will exercise all the different muscles in your body. For instance, you don't want nice strong biceps but wimpy triceps. For the best health, all the muscles in your body will be fit and well balanced. IN order to work out a lot but to avoid overworking specific muscles, many serious fitness fans figure out schedules where they will work only certain muscles on certain days so they can work out many times a week but still have plenty of days for each muscle to recover. One of those splitting up methods often called 'push pull' has already been mentioned. There are many such versions available free on the internet, worked out by those far more knowledgeable than I. -Eva

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7970 · August 02, 2010 at 1:35 PM

I do a fairly simple rotation, giving myself a rest day or two if I need in, wherever in my schedule it happens to fall.

My primary goal is to try to hit opposing muscle groups to balance out the push and the pull.

Day 1: Pushups Day 2: Bodyweight Rows (inverse rows, 'upside down pushups') Day 3: (assisted) Handstand pushups Day 4: Pullups

If I'm feeling up to it I'll throw in a day of deadlifts and a day of pistols.

I'll end up hitting the same muscles a little more often than perhaps I should, but this seems to work for me.

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220 · August 01, 2010 at 8:39 PM

If you are doing strength training, 3 days a week is plenty for a beginner. I think that Starting Strength is a good, easy-to-follow program. Strong lifts 5x5 is another good option. When you are lifting heavy (weights that you can only lift for 5 or fewer reps), you will need plenty of time for both your muscle fibers and your CNS to recover and adapt between workouts. Although you are a beginner and may not be moving a ton of weight at first, your body is still being asked to do something it was previously unable to do as you progress, so rest is very important.

On the other hand, if you are not focused just on strength and are looking to build overall capacity, a CrossFit-style program that mixes different movements together 5 days a week might be more appropriate.

For my money, you should try to get strong first, then build capacity with a CrossFit-style program.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 12:32 AM

hi. I don't think that pullups and pushups are going to prepare you much for physical work :) You might find that your lower back is where most of the stress goes. Then biceps and front shoulders and maybe grip.

I think you're right in doing some training every day, though I would think of it more as fitness/stamina than strength training. Let's say you magically developed the ability to do 100 pushups. Then you start the farm job and find after two hours that your lower back is screaming, along with your trapezius muscles, and you are all tired out and want only to just get off your feet. And no one had asked you to do anything like pushups at all.

So maybe repeatedly bending and carrying and heaving things, digging with a shovel, and sometimes lifting things over your head would be good. You'll also hopefully learn about using your structure efficiently. Good luck.

(You might also look on youtube for the appropriately named exercise--> Farmer's Walk.)

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2065 · August 02, 2010 at 11:09 PM

Thanks JP, I really appreciate your help.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:22 PM

@Hannah, it's definitely a good idea to add farmer walks.. Especially if you add them to a routine that has pushups, pullups, and squats. I wish you good luck and if anything, feel free to contact me.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:20 PM

@Ken, This is why short and intense strength sessions will prepare her. Improving maximal strength is the only way to go IMO. And, by the way, I have a farm.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 9:20 PM

@Ken, Deadlift is a great excercise because it does work the back but it also works the lats. There is nothing wrong with using a move that is lat dominant. I don't ignore the context of her situation. If I followed your logic, I would have to make her train 8-10 hours DAILY to prepare her for the real thing. I suggested training 20-30mins so she gets used to the tensions. Yes, working on a farm is quite hard sometimes but it's not like you are near maximum effort constantly.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:31 PM

I'll definitely be adding the farmers walk too.

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2065 · August 01, 2010 at 6:28 PM

Hi, Thanks Ken. I do see your point and I'm not sure anything will prepare me for farm work except the work itself :) However, I do need upper body strength and push ups and pull ups are great for that right? I'm definitely doing some pull up type moves with bands that are targeting my lower back + floor exercises for the core. @JP- I think you are right that b/c I am a beginner these exercises are a good start. My back seems to get a good workout when I do pull-ups and push ups but maybe I will eventually need to do extra work with my back.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 6:05 PM

@JP As far as pushups, it is the abs that prevent the midsection from falling to the floor. Your lower back muscles are probably activated more by leaning forward over the key board while typing.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 6:01 PM

@JP Unfortunately, you continue to ignore the context of her situation by talking about general training, which will not prepare her very well for *farm work*. That will entail long hours, hardly ever involve the lats, etc., and you can't alternate days off. You are answering her subject line but not the actual situation. Also, do you see that 20 min x 4 days /week is not the same thing as 8-10 hours, 5 days per week? Lat strength will be irrelevant on a job. If you continue to insist that pullups develop lower back, I don't know what to say. You can also insist that the sun is blue.

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1973 · August 01, 2010 at 5:47 PM

Kinesiology student or not, pullups and pushups do not put anywhere near the stress on "the core" that the various deadlift variants do. Suggesting otherwise is highly misleading.

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18671 · August 01, 2010 at 3:05 AM

Pushups and pullups are compound exercises. Of course they develop your back muscles.

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:14 AM

Forgot to say how they develop lower back strength. Pullups work the back (obviously the core prevents the legs from ''falling''). Pushups is a no brainer. It's done in a plank position so that should tell you how good it is for the core. Once you master the basics, you move to something harder (L-pullups for instance)

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:14 AM

Forgot to say how they develop lower back strength. Pullups work the work (obviously the core prevents the legs from ''falling''). Pushups is a no brainer. It's done in a plank position so that should tell you how good it is for the core. Once you master the basics, you move to something harder (L-pullups for instance)

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:07 AM

Btw, I said Pushups AND pullups AND squat. Once you master the basics, and you start to work on harder variations, you will find out how great they are for all your body. Just youtube Bar-barians or bar stylers if you disagree. Calisthenics are a great tool for strength. I'm sorry you disagree with me, but I happen to be a kinesiology student and I will stick with what I learned (and works for me).

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 2:06 AM

Ken, strength is about nervous system adaption. You have to adapt to tension. You dont need a huge amount of volume if you workout daily. For instance, I can do handstands or l-sit or 15 ring pullups (no real feat of strength btw) and I workout about 20 mins 4 times a week without ever going to failure. Keeping the volume low means doing enough volume to stimulate strength gains without frying the CNS. The actual amount will vary on the individual and his/her fitness levels.

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272 · August 01, 2010 at 1:20 AM

How could you possibly think that pullups and pushups develop lower back?!? Huh? Besides, I have had actual physical jobs in construction, this is not just theory to me. Your advice to her above says to keep "low volume". How does that possibly fit in preparing for a farm job?

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551 · August 01, 2010 at 12:59 AM

Pullups and pushups will develop lower back strength. Especially since she is beginning. Add to that some leg work (squat) and she is all set, to be honest. I second that Farmer's walk is a great exercise.

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10 · July 31, 2010 at 10:41 PM

Find a CrossFit gym and join. www.crossfit.com

They have excellent coaches and great ramp up programs, they will also be able to teach you how to scale the workouts. For instance doing pushups on your knees, pullups using bands, etc...

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2759 · July 31, 2010 at 9:43 PM

I'm pretty much in the same boat as you are, Hannah. I've been doing counter push-ups and using HundredPushups.com to guide me through it. I've had some pretty good success with that. My guess is that since there's no need to "burn calories" to build muscle that resting them for a day or so is a good idea. You can work different sets of muscles on alternate days, though.

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2065 · July 31, 2010 at 10:09 PM

Yes, I was thinking about alternating days with lower body one day and upper the next, but I don't know how "natural" that is. I look forward to the day when I can do more heavy lifting and hopefully have shorter workouts. I feel like my workouts last a little too long b/c I do so many different exercises.

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1398 · July 03, 2013 at 1:35 AM

Especially as a beginner, you just plain need to put the work in. You are such a beginner (can't do a pushup) that you can't push your muscles to the point where they need the time to recover. A great way to quickly improve your physical capabilities is to do it often to "grease the groove." Try a basic workout of pushups/pullups/squats. Say you start day 1 by just holding the top of a push up, hanging onto a bar, and doing 10 squats. Add a rep, or time, or a round, each time you can and just make small progressions.

For my personal experience: I went through a phase this winter where I was squatting 4 days a week, going overhead 4-5 days a week, and lifting every single day. I never went to failure, but I pushed it hard. I got stronger, leaner, and in way better shape. The average person (including paleoites) is so far away from overtraining it is laughable.

You say you want to work on a farm. I work on an (oyster) farm. I shovel 45+ tons of oysters a day. In between shoveling, I am constantly on my feet, moving around, picking stuff up, moving heavy things. Hell in between pots we do pushups sometimes. You need to have a motor to keep up all day. I'm lucky in that I started in great shape, otherwise I wouldn't have made it. To build that motor, you plain and simple need to do more work. Do something every single day. Add more when it gets to easy. Keep progressing. Obviously vary your workouts, but keep it simple and effective.

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0 · July 02, 2013 at 9:34 PM

I always hear people saying you need to rest or don't do the same muscles each day. But, really I believe listening to your body is the best answer. Because people in physical jobs do repetitive lifting or push pulling which is still exercise. Your body doesn't know if your getting paid in a job or just trying to exercise. In either case it's best not to overdo. Both will result in problems. Same with team sports like rowing, paddling, etc. practice is 5 days a week. Beginners take more breaks or skip more practice based on how their body feels. No one says practice is 3 days a week. So it depends on what type of results you want and listening to your body. My kids swim and that can be 6 to 7 days a week with morning and evening practice for a total of 3 or so hours. And while they aren't using weights, they are using resistance of water paddles, fins and the bungie which holds you pack while you try to swim forward. In the beginning you listen to your body, miss more practices or only hit one a day until you build up. And even when you can go 6-7 days a week for full workouts when you feel your body fatigue or muscles you take a break. Athletes DO NOT just decide the norm is skip every other day or only do 2-3 days a week and they are very fit. So the rest of us don't need that type of limitation either. You have the choice to be as fit as an athlete or anything in between depending on your personal fitness goal, even if you are not an athlete. Don't over limit yourself.

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0 · February 22, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Pull ups will work the lower back the same as push ups will. It just depends what you mean by work. The erector spinae will be working isometrically but not isotonically during both exercises. Of course this could be useful for labouring but doesn't mimic the more typical spinal extension movements involved in lifting.

Of course low volume work is also useful for developing maximal strength meaning you can lift more in one go. Of course it will not necessarily improve muscular endurance over 8 hours or strength endurance, ability to repeatedly lift maximum loads. To train that you would need to do repeated sets with little rest at a sub maximal load.

You were both right.

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