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How Important is sleeping to weight loss?

by (20787)
Updated October 29, 2014 at 3:06 AM
Created October 05, 2010 at 3:40 PM

For those of you with stalled weight loss, how much sleep are you getting? Intuitively, one might suspect that being awake more would burn more calories, but some interesting info here: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/10/big-sleep.html Not only did people who were awake more lose the same amount of weight as those who slept more, they lost a lot more of that weight as lean muscle mass instead of as fat. Looks like adequate sleep helps greatly with fat loss and preserves lean muscle. Make sure you are getting your sleep to make you feel fully rested. (I haven't researched it thoroughly, but I suspect strongly that stress has a similar effect as well..)

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9647 · October 07, 2010 at 11:48 PM

Nevermind, I see how everyone is using the term now, I'm reading the Robb Wolf book.

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20787 · October 06, 2010 at 2:37 AM

I did in the past, but I just had to crack down and set limits. Once I got in the habit of going to bed earlier, it got easier.

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20787 · October 06, 2010 at 2:36 AM

I have never had any luck adjusting to not enough sleep. In fact, the longer it goes on, the worse I feel!

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18671 · October 05, 2010 at 11:22 PM

That said, there is also this study: http://chronicle.uchicago.edu/991202/sleep.shtml which says "Lack of sleep alters hormones, metabolism."

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9647 · October 05, 2010 at 4:15 PM

Hi Stephen, what do you mean by signaling process, or which things do you include under that? Just all the hormonal stuff in general (since hormones are the "messengers")?

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22913 · October 05, 2010 at 3:49 PM

When I lost my weight, I was very strict with diet... I could attest my stalls to sleep or stress.

Lack of sleep itself is stressful.

I think it all ties back to the inflammatory response. It seems all the things, stress, sleep and diet that cause inflammation... all cause stalls.

I think its as simple(and complicated) as an interruption of the bodys signalling process.

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9647 · October 05, 2010 at 4:15 PM

Hi Stephen, what do you mean by signaling process, or which things do you include under that? Just all the hormonal stuff in general (since hormones are the "messengers")?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4
9647 · October 07, 2010 at 11:48 PM

Nevermind, I see how everyone is using the term now, I'm reading the Robb Wolf book.

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123 · October 05, 2010 at 4:15 PM

It's crucial. In fact, Robb Wolf's new book explains that a lack of sleep can make you as insulin resistant as a type I diabetic!

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2759 · October 06, 2010 at 6:54 AM

Robb Wolf explained the need for sleep pretty well in his book as Luther pointed out. I knew about it before because I noticed that when I slept badly (or, more often, just not enough) the following day I had absolutely horrible self-control around food - even to the point of buying candy and soda at inflated prices and damn the consequences! Ugh, that was bad.

Hmmm, look at the time. I've got to get to bed.

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18671 · October 05, 2010 at 8:37 PM

I tend to agree with the commenter on that article who points out that sleep is a lower metabolic state, and therefore those who slept less would have been in more of an energy deficit. It's possible that this crossed a threshold after which the body started using lean tissue.

Another possibly confounding factor he mentions is that adapting to a new sleep schedule is stressful. Perhaps they would have fared better if allowed to adapt to the low sleep schedule gradually.

I would add to these that diet composition was probably unfavourable. The results may have been less pronounced or otherwise different on a good diet.

Sleep deprivation is serious, no doubt. I just feel the study has problems.

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18671 · October 05, 2010 at 11:22 PM

That said, there is also this study: http://chronicle.uchicago.edu/991202/sleep.shtml which says "Lack of sleep alters hormones, metabolism."

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20787 · October 06, 2010 at 2:36 AM

I have never had any luck adjusting to not enough sleep. In fact, the longer it goes on, the worse I feel!

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4896 · October 05, 2010 at 5:43 PM

It's not only the length but quality as well. I do sleep a lot (around 7-10h depends on a day) but my sleep is not of a good quality, which is probably a result of my fibromyalgia. The theory says I have difficulties to get into the Delta stage, which is the most restful.

I do have problems with losing weight, and I don't really know what's the reason (I eat correctly), as there is always more than one factor.

But the sleep is definitely a very important element of healthy life.

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1510 · October 05, 2010 at 5:39 PM

For whatever reason, I'm so much better at managing my diet and keeping commitments to myself in regard to diet than I am at managing my sleep. I'll tell myself that I'll go to be by 12, but it rarely ever happens. Does anyone else have the same issue?

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20787 · October 06, 2010 at 2:37 AM

I did in the past, but I just had to crack down and set limits. Once I got in the habit of going to bed earlier, it got easier.

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