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Beans and nuts...

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Updated about 12 hours ago
Created April 20, 2014 at 1:29 AM

I've read other questions on here about legumes, but I still don't understand why they are considered a "to be avoided food". I tolerate properly prepared legumes (chickpeas, pinto beans, kidney beans, adzuki beans, etc. with the exception of soy and peanuts.) MUCH better than properly prepared nuts for some reason and that is why I am curious. This is just an n=1, I am just trying to find out what works for me and my body :)

So I guess my question is, why are beans not Paleo and nuts are Paleo, considering what is present in them (toxins, anti nutrients, etc.)?

(Just for the record, I'm mostly Paleo. I mostly eat meat and tubers because my body thrives on those. I have occasional fruit, some vegetables, occasional dairy (yogurt, cheese, etc.) and I haven't experimented with properly prepared grains (so no grains at all at the moment). No legumes right now, I just know I tolerate them well.)

Thanks for your answers. I look forward to reading them!

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598 · April 21, 2014 at 3:08 PM

Try macadamias. 3 ounces in one sitting can bother me but only a little and that's like a LOT of food. I usually eat 0.5-1 ounce at a time, adding up to 1-4 ounces daily.

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598 · April 21, 2014 at 3:05 PM

With Matt on this. How so? Broth is a very healthy food but there's SOOO much variation in potentially "healthy diet(s)".

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598 · April 21, 2014 at 3:02 PM

I didn't + or - anything food friend cow. Just gave you a piece of my mind.

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598 · April 21, 2014 at 3:00 PM

I meet and exceed my micronutrient needs as confirmed by daily food tracking. Macadamia nuts are just a good whole-food source of healthy fats. What's so good about olive oil, tallow, or coconut oil? Not much micronutrition in those and they're more processed, yet they're common "paleo" staples.

Plus, I'm a snacker. Macadamia nuts is one snack I never have to regret. Never upsets my gut (unless I eat like 4-5 ounces in one sitting) and it DOES have some decent micronutrition, just nothing particularly potent.

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598 · April 21, 2014 at 2:54 PM

AFAIK: no. You probably lose some minerals with the skin but the phytates and irritants go with them. Vitamin E is fat soluable so it's prbably all in the almond oils.

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4991 · April 21, 2014 at 11:46 AM

raydawg, I didn't mean to give the impression that I supposed coffee and chocolate to be legumes - I don't! I was responding to Sam's comment, and suggesting that soaking legumes is no more preparation / processing than making coffee, chocolate, bacon etc. i.e. legumes are pretty much not processed at all.

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17329 · April 21, 2014 at 10:20 AM

Um, coffee are chocolate aren't legumes. Bacon is simply a smoked/cured pork belly - very much paleo. In terms of processing, it's the industrial style processes that are to be considered suspect, and even some of those are fine.

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41538 · April 21, 2014 at 1:53 AM

What's so great about macademias to make them a dietary staple? Not much micronutrition there, just a ton of MUFAs…

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41538 · April 21, 2014 at 1:51 AM

Broth is a pillar of any healthy diet? Oh brother. What silliness.

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208 · April 20, 2014 at 10:32 PM

Possibly they wouldn't be doing that if they alternatives. Surprise that my innocuous answer would draw +1 or -1 from anyone.

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1242 · April 20, 2014 at 10:21 PM

broth is not paleo as troglodytes did not have pottery, yet it is a pillar of any conceivable healthy diet.

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40 · April 20, 2014 at 10:12 PM

This post is inspiring me to try some soaked and cooked beans too. I know that I used to tolerate them well.

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0 · April 20, 2014 at 4:13 PM

I soak lentils over night in a jar, put them in a strainer and rinse them like once or twice a day until they sprout, then I either make a huge vegetable soup out of them or steam them for salad. So yeah I cook them but heard you could eat them raw? They cook a gazillion times faster though.

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245 · April 20, 2014 at 3:56 PM

Does soaking/deskinning almonds remove the vitamin E content?

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598 · April 20, 2014 at 3:42 PM

I agree with your last sentence but just take a look at traditional H/G cultures today. In many tribes the women spend vast amounts of time carefully preparing and processing otherwise undigestable or potentially toxic plant foods. Sounds like properly prepared beans fit the bill (though I've avoided them until now - going to go pick up some organic lentils and see how I tolerate)

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598 · April 20, 2014 at 3:37 PM

Question: do you cook your lentils after sprouting them or just eat them raw like in a salad or something? What other steps do you take in preparation? (ready to add lentils back into my own diet...)

Comment: I mostly avoid nuts with one HUGE exception and one small exception. HUGE: macadamia nuts are a staple. Probably my single largest dietary staple. I eat them almost every day on the order of 1-3 ounces. small: I occasionally soak and deskin almonds. They don't give me any trouble when properly soaked and deskinned. Sometimes I'll pop a single brazilnut because of the selenium.

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245 · April 20, 2014 at 3:23 PM

Agree with this to an extent, but I think why it's generally not considered paleo is the fact that people don't prepare there legumes properly. If one was to say, 'Yes, legumes are paleo, but make sure to prepare them properly' I imagine quite a few people would disregard the second part entirely and then wonder why they aren't getting the results they want so it's easier just to say, 'No' then throw in the caveat for people who read the fine print and will prepare things the right way.

You can also note while nuts also contain antinutrients they are often roasted straight from the stor

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4991 · April 21, 2014 at 9:11 AM

"Properly prepared means..." - so presumably you don't eat coffee / chocolate / butter / lard / bacon / fermented foods / etc etc. The list of foods which are considered perfectly OK as paleo foods but which take a lot of processing is large. Legumes take no more preparation so are OK in my book.

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17329 · April 21, 2014 at 10:20 AM

Um, coffee are chocolate aren't legumes. Bacon is simply a smoked/cured pork belly - very much paleo. In terms of processing, it's the industrial style processes that are to be considered suspect, and even some of those are fine.

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4991 · April 21, 2014 at 11:46 AM

raydawg, I didn't mean to give the impression that I supposed coffee and chocolate to be legumes - I don't! I was responding to Sam's comment, and suggesting that soaking legumes is no more preparation / processing than making coffee, chocolate, bacon etc. i.e. legumes are pretty much not processed at all.

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1005 · April 21, 2014 at 4:40 AM

Legumes also offer a nice potential source of trace minerals, like molybdenum, which you might not find in fruits / vegetables / meats. I use hazelnuts as an easy way to up my manganese, and an occasional brazil nut is practically a selenium supplement. If you digest these well, they seem to have a place in a well balanced diet. I don't particularly buy into the phytates argument against them, in the context of an otherwise nutritionally-dense diet. If you have a biomarker for hemochromatosis (~10% of the population), phytic acid actually helps to pull iron out of the places it shouldn't be.

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40 · April 20, 2014 at 10:16 PM

The way I think of the difference from an evolutionary viewpoint is that nuts are generally protected with a super hard shell, compared to the thin pods of legumes, so nuts might have relatively less anti-nutrients than legumes. Also, nuts can be eaten raw, while legumes can't be.

But you're question has me re-thinking properly prepared legumes. And I just read Chris Kresser's post here: http://chriskresser.com/are-legumes-paleo

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1242 · April 20, 2014 at 3:14 PM

There are two differences, one beans are, generally speaking, slightly more nutritious in nutrients that are not particularly abundant in paleo-like diets. two, the really big advantage is that beans are mostly soaked, often germinated, and cooked. Nuts are mostly raw and are digestive bricks. Good for them, they are trying to discourage you from eating them. Beans have not evolved to counteract the effect of prolonged soaking with multiple water changes, followed by thorough cooking (nor will we let them). It is no coincidence that my favorite nuts are chestnuts, because they are roasted, and really the only nut that does not bother me in quantities above one or two ounces.

Medium avatar
598 · April 21, 2014 at 3:08 PM

Try macadamias. 3 ounces in one sitting can bother me but only a little and that's like a LOT of food. I usually eat 0.5-1 ounce at a time, adding up to 1-4 ounces daily.

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0 · April 20, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Maybe I'll get flamed for this by the sheep followers, maybe not though..

Well I pretty much think the whole "cavemen ate this, cavemen did that" is the most ridiculous part of the paleo fad. When applied to such specific food topics it's an incredibly stupid diagnosis for how we should conduct our lives.

Yeah legumes and nuts need to be properly prepared. So does coffee, cocoa, folks who cook their meat, cook down the tough cellulose in veggies, bake a potato, make bacon, drink water, ferment foods, even processing the flesh of a hunt in the most "paleo-esque" way possible requires preparation. Also considering so many paleo-sheep pop an incredible amount of supplements for whatever reason.

SO,

In my experience, I think legumes are pretty good, yes - when prepared properly. I only eat lentils anymore and always sprout them before eating them. I've noticed I don't get the big bean side-effects when I do this over eating canned or unsprouted beans. Just don't sprout kidney beans I've heard.

Nuts suck for me. I can see the skins in my poop and they make me hurt.

Medium avatar
598 · April 20, 2014 at 3:37 PM

Question: do you cook your lentils after sprouting them or just eat them raw like in a salad or something? What other steps do you take in preparation? (ready to add lentils back into my own diet...)

Comment: I mostly avoid nuts with one HUGE exception and one small exception. HUGE: macadamia nuts are a staple. Probably my single largest dietary staple. I eat them almost every day on the order of 1-3 ounces. small: I occasionally soak and deskin almonds. They don't give me any trouble when properly soaked and deskinned. Sometimes I'll pop a single brazilnut because of the selenium.

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245 · April 20, 2014 at 3:23 PM

Agree with this to an extent, but I think why it's generally not considered paleo is the fact that people don't prepare there legumes properly. If one was to say, 'Yes, legumes are paleo, but make sure to prepare them properly' I imagine quite a few people would disregard the second part entirely and then wonder why they aren't getting the results they want so it's easier just to say, 'No' then throw in the caveat for people who read the fine print and will prepare things the right way.

You can also note while nuts also contain antinutrients they are often roasted straight from the stor

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208 · April 20, 2014 at 5:29 AM

Properly prepared for me means that it shouldn't be considered Paleo. I can't imagine that early man was sitting around and soaking beans, nuts or any other foods for 24 hours prior to cooking them. Nuts are supposedly ok in small quantities and I tolerate them well, whereas for me beans just lay in my stomach and cause a discomfort that I'd just as soon avoid.

Ultimately eating what works for you and doesn't come from factories is what I consider Paleo.

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1242 · April 20, 2014 at 10:21 PM

broth is not paleo as troglodytes did not have pottery, yet it is a pillar of any conceivable healthy diet.

Medium avatar
598 · April 20, 2014 at 3:42 PM

I agree with your last sentence but just take a look at traditional H/G cultures today. In many tribes the women spend vast amounts of time carefully preparing and processing otherwise undigestable or potentially toxic plant foods. Sounds like properly prepared beans fit the bill (though I've avoided them until now - going to go pick up some organic lentils and see how I tolerate)

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