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No one ever mentions consuming raisins....

by (5768)
Updated about 2 hours ago
Created February 06, 2011 at 9:29 PM

My son loves raisin. I understand that it's a fruit and the sugar content, but I never hear anyone talk about them. Are raisins avoided for some reason I am unaware of?

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1169 · August 14, 2014 at 6:56 PM

Better than chocolate but I agree they are not great. I just ate 325g of them. Not wise.

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22913 · September 07, 2013 at 1:28 AM

Most lower glycemic fruits are high fructose because fructose is low glycemic. Don't trust glycemic index for choosing healthy food. Fructose throws the scale off, it's why SAD thinks high fructose agave syrup(aka agave nectar) is healthy...sigh

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2949 · December 04, 2012 at 12:32 AM

Nothing wrong with raisins (and sugar) in moderation as part of a balanced (paleo) diet. I eat 50g or so a week along with other fruit.

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19220 · March 13, 2011 at 11:30 AM

Prunes are low in fructose compared to most dried fruit. They contain twice as much glucose as fructose. Prunes also contain sorbitol that contributes to their sweetness.

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545 · February 08, 2011 at 3:22 PM

I don't see why that drawn out calculation was necessary... I wasn't trying to refute your exact statement of the fructose content of raisins, I was acting to further reinforce your post in agreement... But hey, I'm "wrong".

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4883 · February 07, 2011 at 9:13 PM

Dental napalm ... candybar on a vine (that's from another comment) ... raisins are terrible food but they have great nicknames! :)

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:24 PM

Fructose clings more than glucose ;)

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4883 · February 07, 2011 at 2:59 AM

Stephen, well said! Candy bars on the vine is exactly what they are! Daniel, according to the USDA database, the sugar in raisins is almost exactly half fructose (to within four tenths of a percent). To be precise, they contain (per 100 g) 0.45 g sucrose (which is half fructose), 27.75 g free glucose, 29.68 g free fructose, and 2.70 g starch (which metabolizes to glucose). If you do the arithmetic, that comes out to 30.67 g glucose and 29.90 g fructose.

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545 · February 07, 2011 at 2:55 AM

Raisins are even more than half fructose! That being said, with raisins, a little goes a long way. I'll sometimes add like 1 tbsp to a curry or Indian dish. 1 pound beef with sauteed onions+garlic, garam masala, and 1 tbsp raisins is an amazing meal. The more important take-away point is don't eat them thinking you're doing yourself any favors, but a small amount as a treat or garnish isn't that bad.

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545 · February 07, 2011 at 2:41 AM

Raisins are not half fructose... they are more like 75% fructose!! That being said, with raisins, a little goes a long way. I'll sometimes add like 1 tbsp to a curry or Indian dish. 1 pound beef with sauteed onions+garlic, garam masala, and 1 tbsp raisins is an amazing meal.

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:36 AM

Go for berries instead, less fructose

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:36 AM

This, 10 times over, candybars on the vine

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18701 · February 06, 2011 at 9:42 PM

LOL. In my search for "raisins" I did find that Carl Stawicki believes they are *turds from Satan's pet rabbit* Hee! http://paleohacks.com/questions/16379/which-foods-would-you-forbid-closed#axzz1DDVMdvad

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15 Answers

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4883 · February 06, 2011 at 10:32 PM

Are raisins avoided for some reason I am unaware of?

Raisins should be avoided because they have astronomically high sugar levels, and half of that sugar is fructose. Fructose is toxic. The body can dispose of it safely in small amounts but larger amounts are harmful.

Raisins have more sugar for their weight than six out of six candy bars that I just looked up: Almond Joy, Krakel, Reeses, Mounds, Twizzlers, or Mr. Goodbar.

The carbs in starch and carbs in raisins are not the same. Starch (obtained from foods like potatoes and sweet potatoes) breaks down into glucose, which is healthy for us. Raisins break down into a mixture of glucose and fructose. Fructose is not healthy for us.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1
4883 · February 07, 2011 at 2:59 AM

Stephen, well said! Candy bars on the vine is exactly what they are! Daniel, according to the USDA database, the sugar in raisins is almost exactly half fructose (to within four tenths of a percent). To be precise, they contain (per 100 g) 0.45 g sucrose (which is half fructose), 27.75 g free glucose, 29.68 g free fructose, and 2.70 g starch (which metabolizes to glucose). If you do the arithmetic, that comes out to 30.67 g glucose and 29.90 g fructose.

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:36 AM

This, 10 times over, candybars on the vine

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317
545 · February 08, 2011 at 3:22 PM

I don't see why that drawn out calculation was necessary... I wasn't trying to refute your exact statement of the fructose content of raisins, I was acting to further reinforce your post in agreement... But hey, I'm "wrong".

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317
545 · February 07, 2011 at 2:55 AM

Raisins are even more than half fructose! That being said, with raisins, a little goes a long way. I'll sometimes add like 1 tbsp to a curry or Indian dish. 1 pound beef with sauteed onions+garlic, garam masala, and 1 tbsp raisins is an amazing meal. The more important take-away point is don't eat them thinking you're doing yourself any favors, but a small amount as a treat or garnish isn't that bad.

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317
545 · February 07, 2011 at 2:41 AM

Raisins are not half fructose... they are more like 75% fructose!! That being said, with raisins, a little goes a long way. I'll sometimes add like 1 tbsp to a curry or Indian dish. 1 pound beef with sauteed onions+garlic, garam masala, and 1 tbsp raisins is an amazing meal.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052
2949 · December 04, 2012 at 12:32 AM

Nothing wrong with raisins (and sugar) in moderation as part of a balanced (paleo) diet. I eat 50g or so a week along with other fruit.

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373 · February 07, 2011 at 7:40 PM

My Dentist refers to raisins as "Dental Napalm"

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1
4883 · February 07, 2011 at 9:13 PM

Dental napalm ... candybar on a vine (that's from another comment) ... raisins are terrible food but they have great nicknames! :)

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18671 · February 07, 2011 at 4:18 AM

Not only are they boluses of sugar, but they (and other dried fruits, including fruit roll-ups) cling to the teeth way more than most other sugar sources. My children's dentist routinely advocates against them.

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:24 PM

Fructose clings more than glucose ;)

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1600 · February 07, 2011 at 12:08 AM

They probably should be treated like any other dried fruit..only for very active people with no insulin issues, and enjoyed in small amounts.

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22913 · February 07, 2011 at 2:36 AM

Go for berries instead, less fructose

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18701 · February 06, 2011 at 9:32 PM

I don't think they are avoided any more than any other type of dried fruit. In fact, last week they were suggested as a great, easily carried snack for a diabetic to carry around, just in case of a needed sugar boost. I can't find the thread now, of course.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705
18701 · February 06, 2011 at 9:42 PM

LOL. In my search for "raisins" I did find that Carl Stawicki believes they are *turds from Satan's pet rabbit* Hee! http://paleohacks.com/questions/16379/which-foods-would-you-forbid-closed#axzz1DDVMdvad

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1065 · March 13, 2011 at 1:55 AM

The sugar is the main concern.

As an alternative, I would suggest dried plums (aka prunes). They have a significantly lower glycemic load, and any impact they have will be more moderate. They tend to be preserved with potassium.... so I don't really think that is an issue.

Although I would not be to concerned with raisins if your being moderate.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · September 07, 2013 at 1:28 AM

Most lower glycemic fruits are high fructose because fructose is low glycemic. Don't trust glycemic index for choosing healthy food. Fructose throws the scale off, it's why SAD thinks high fructose agave syrup(aka agave nectar) is healthy...sigh

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · March 13, 2011 at 11:30 AM

Prunes are low in fructose compared to most dried fruit. They contain twice as much glucose as fructose. Prunes also contain sorbitol that contributes to their sweetness.

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1781 · March 14, 2011 at 6:48 AM

I had to take the two grandkids, 7 and 10 to an appointment with me as I was babysitting and no one else was available. Unbeknown to me they brought along a zip lock bag of raisins for a "snack" (how I hate that word), anyway after about half an hour of steadily increasing volume they were off their trees! Virtually uncontrollable, boy was I glad to get home and give them back to their mother who just shrugged and said, "yeah, they do that". Ug, wouldn't have them in the house! (The rasins, not the GK's)

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3014 · February 07, 2011 at 5:25 AM

If you are going to buy raisins or other dried fruit, best to look for the type with no added sugar. Dried fruit also have sulfates in them as a preservative. I'm not sure if the ones with added sugar do too.

I'd buy the most natural version I can find and keep it down to an occasional treat.

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1710 · February 06, 2011 at 10:22 PM

The only reason to avoid them is that gram for gram they are just about pure sugar. So it's ridiculously easy to throw off your macronutrient ratios by eating raisins.

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4276 · February 06, 2011 at 9:37 PM

I would treat them just as any other fruit, and look at the numbers. Of course, I think it all depends on what type of paleo you are. If youre low-carb plaeo, I would cut them out completely, they really are just little balls of sugar. However, if you are allowing yourself some natural carbs, potatoes and frutis and such, then they would seem fine.

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0 · July 09, 2013 at 9:07 PM

They add HUGE amounts of added sugar in them to.

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1232 · December 03, 2012 at 11:19 PM

I'd be less worried about the sugar/fructose content and more about the vegetable oil that is often added to them. I don't think I've ever come across a packet of raisins without this added ingredient!

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1169 · December 03, 2012 at 10:00 PM

As a sugar addict I have often abused raisins - probably no one on the planet can eat as many as I can at one sitting, sadly.

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0 · September 17, 2011 at 4:07 PM

I was looking up the fructose content on raisins and found your site. I mix raisins and kefir from raw goats milk in mason jars to help absorb some of the sugar. I haven't seen any research on this as to how effective it is. I'm sure the longer the fermenting process is allowed the better but again haven't found any data on that either. I keep the jars in the frig which slows the fermenting process. Based on the info here it looks like raisins may be better off avoided altogether. I eat kefired raisins just because I enjoy them.

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0 · August 08, 2011 at 4:05 AM

It's specific to your body needs I would say.

IF your not diabetic and your specific diet allows for a higher fructose count than say, somebody who is trying to loose weight, I'd say go for it. Although try to get the ones with no sugar or preservatives added.

My personal favorite spin on Ants on the Log, 3 inch slices of celery covered with almond butter and topped with a minimal amount of raisins. The tasty dried grapes are key, don't sacrifice deliciousness.

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