4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d
4

Was your genetic test worth it?

by (213)
Updated September 16, 2014 at 7:58 PM
Created November 30, 2012 at 8:10 PM

Did you learn something that lead to a significant change in your daily routine?

Do you think your health will be even better now that you have this new information?

Do you trust the results?

Do you think the science is too young to be accurate enough to be of much value?

Was it worth the money?

Which genetic testing lab did you work with?

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9
1211 · December 01, 2012 at 2:49 PM

23andme risk assessment is based on correlating individual genome to general population genetic studies, as opposed to the 23andme population.

B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f
1495 · November 30, 2012 at 10:38 PM

I wonder if you are below average compared to 23andme's population? I'm waiting on my 23andme results. Sounds like you learned some interesting stuff, so I'm excited to find out my results.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73
20908 · November 30, 2012 at 9:05 PM

Oh yes. Information will never be accurate. It just that you should play the game "if I had perfect data, what would I do" before you go collect imperfect data. If you don't know what you'd do with perfect data, then you definitely don't know what you'd do with imperfect data.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d
213 · November 30, 2012 at 9:00 PM

I'm sure there's at least one thing you might want to know about yourself isn't there? And couldn't you use that information to your benefit? especially if it were perfectly accurate?

Total Views
1K

Recent Activity
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

Last Activity
31D AGO

Followers
2

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

6 Answers

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25
2
3742 · November 30, 2012 at 9:50 PM

I used 23andme and Promethease as well. I was having some difficult to diagnose health problems and I thought that the genetic tests might help me narrow down other tests to pursue. People usually focus on the disease risk factors but it's worth noting that 23andme can accurately diagnose a number of genetic diseases as well and compared to laboratory testing it's a fantastic deal. When planning kids I found it useful to know what diseases I wasn't a carrier for that my wife is.

Fortunately, I learned that I'm low risk for all the diseases that run in my family. I'm high risk for a few things but everyone is and it's hard to make make sense of a 4.2% risk vs 3.4%. It's even harder to know how a Paleo lifestyle affects these numbers. One word of caution: my GI ordered a several thousand dollar genetic lab test for celiac disease which was medium-high risk while 23andme says I'm below average.

The only change I made in the end was to eliminate dairy from my diet but again I'm guessing everyone is almost certainly lactose intolerant as an adult and I would have done that anyway as part of going Paleo :)

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9
1211 · December 01, 2012 at 2:49 PM

23andme risk assessment is based on correlating individual genome to general population genetic studies, as opposed to the 23andme population.

B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f
1495 · November 30, 2012 at 10:38 PM

I wonder if you are below average compared to 23andme's population? I'm waiting on my 23andme results. Sounds like you learned some interesting stuff, so I'm excited to find out my results.

21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03
1
1688 · November 30, 2012 at 9:07 PM

I probably paid too much for it, and it hasn't impacted my day-to-day behavior.

But I did learn that I have a rare genetic defect that can impact protein absorption and lower dopamine levels.

I learned that I don't have the APOE-4 gene that can predispose people to Alzheimer's (which is somewhat reassuring because there is family history). Or the BRCA cancer mutations.

Apparently I also have an SNP in the oxytocin receptor which may make me less empathetic than most people.

It was interesting finding out about my haplogroup via the maternal line.

I trust the results, but most of them are either of the reassuring or amusing kind, or of the not-yet-relevant kind.

I used 23and me, and used Promethease for additional screening of the data.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73
1
20908 · November 30, 2012 at 8:28 PM

I assume you're planning on doing some type of genetic testing. And while I admire that you're asking questions about it before you go to do it. I have one more question that I want you to answer first:

If I had a free perfectly accurate test that could give you perfect data, what would you do with that data?

Do you know what you're looking for and what you'd change based on that data?

This is one question I want to get people to ask for everything, whether it's genetic testing or tracking your food or workouts. Know what you'd do with perfect data before you go looking for the data.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73
20908 · November 30, 2012 at 9:05 PM

Oh yes. Information will never be accurate. It just that you should play the game "if I had perfect data, what would I do" before you go collect imperfect data. If you don't know what you'd do with perfect data, then you definitely don't know what you'd do with imperfect data.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d
213 · November 30, 2012 at 9:00 PM

I'm sure there's at least one thing you might want to know about yourself isn't there? And couldn't you use that information to your benefit? especially if it were perfectly accurate?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84
0
17013 · February 22, 2014 at 4:08 PM

Had to get mine through http://ancestry.com due to the stupidity of NY state legislation as well as the FDA's chest pounding.

I fed the results to http://promethease.com and http://geneticgenie.org

Looks like I have two MTHFR mutations as well as a vitamin D receptor mutation, still researching what I might do differently every day, but yes, it was worth it, and it will change what I do daily. There are a few other things in there, but nothing very actionable outside keeping a strict paleo diet and taking more zinc.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57
0
1005 · February 21, 2014 at 2:54 PM

I've done some basic genetic testing. The science is very early in its infancy, but I think there's a TON of potential there to explain a lot of mysterious disease and illness and offer individualized nutritional recommendations and better medical treatments.

The APOE stuff is interesting, but I found it much more interesting looking at things like your COMT enzymes and such. I did the tests for everyone in my family, so it's been fun to pick through the data and pull out observations. Like who gets the most sick in the family (me, with the most homozygous methylation mutations) and who is the most sane (my mom, the only one in the family with fast COMT) and who developed cancer (my dad, a vegetarian in his 20s, which would have been a low-b12 diet, and the only one in the family with triple compound MTHFR mutations on C677T, A1298C, AND 03 P39P + a heterozygous blocked BHMT shortcut + a heterozygous blocked MTRR path + CBS upregulation, as well as the only one in the family with a SHMT1 C1420T mutation) and see that in the data.

My sister is going to be trying to get pregnant soon and she is homozygous at MTHFR C677T, so that'll make a difference on her prenatals by switching out the folic acid for folate.

"I’ve looked at disease as a combination of lifestyle, environment, and heredity. I am now looking at disease as a combination of lifestyle, environment, and Methyl Cycle Genomic Defects."

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9
0
1211 · December 01, 2012 at 2:40 PM

It was worth it for me. I used 23andme and Promethease.

I think it does depend on the person and how the data might affect them. For me, I like having data and I feel I'm pretty good about keeping it all in perspective. For some, it might add stress and they might just be better off not knowing. In fact, 23andme requires additional approval to unlock and show certain results.

A main initial interest was to find if I had ApoE4, which I suspected I might since I tend to have higher serum cholesterol than others on similar diets. I confirmed I'm ApoE4/3. This was reassuring for me as I understand this better and it affects my view on dietary fat and I pay closer attention to ApoE4, Alzheimer's studies.

I also found my results indicate a much higher risk for Age-related Macular Degeneration. Knowing this, I focus a little more on things I can do for eye health.

I feel the science is mature enough and is valuable, similar to other types of health related science and studies.

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account