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Storing soaked brown rice?

by (132)
Updated about 14 hours ago
Created August 20, 2011 at 6:57 PM

I've recently added brown rice to my diet as opposed to white rice, because the I believe that the nutrient profile is better. I have been soaking it according to this method here: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/04/new-way-to-soak-brown-rice.html.

My question is that it's sort of a pain to remember the evening before I want to eat rice to soak it and get it ready. Is there anyway to store brown rice after it has been soaked, that does not ruin the nutrient profile, or negate the point of soaking it to begin with? Can I freeze it? Store it in the fridge? How long will it keep for?

I would like to be able to soak a large quantity at a time, then wait to cook it till I am ready to eat it. Any thought? Thanks

42f33b23ca2b7c788bdd85afe6bb9dde
95 · August 23, 2011 at 8:41 PM

Wonderful explanation. thanks, Alex. Great to get clear cut answers.

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2765 · August 22, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Freezing... yep, that's a good choice too.

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2765 · August 22, 2011 at 5:23 PM

fermentation decreasing phytates? Hmmmm....probably. I didn't think of that. I just don't eat fermented foods. If I were going to make sake maybe... but I don't make that either. fermented = spoiled to me.

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459 · August 22, 2011 at 5:17 PM

Yeast and bacteria don't particularly like to be frozen. When they freeze their cell walls rupture, resulting in death. Commercial yeast strains (bread, beer, wine yeasts) are frozen in a highly controled environment, and still suffer some damage from the process, namely "leaky" cell walls.

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1219 · August 21, 2011 at 3:54 AM

Cooking in cinnamon infused coconut cream/milk is also a great way to prepare rice.

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459 · August 21, 2011 at 3:02 AM

Downvoted for not having read the link and SG's data.

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132 · August 21, 2011 at 12:03 AM

Sorry, I was quoting guyenet and I misquoted him. He says after several times it can reach a 96% reduction in phytate.

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15003 · August 20, 2011 at 11:13 PM

Rice freezes nicely, so I agree with the idea to cook, then portion it. It will last longer in the freezer if you vacuum seal it, but you probably don't need to worry about this for the amount you make in an average-sized rice cooker. BTW, if you haven't, try making your rice with bone broth to increase its nutrients.

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36 · August 20, 2011 at 10:20 PM

Yes, but fermentation is hard to control unless you have a fairly steady and well maintained temperature. Random fermentation is likely to give you a half fermented and half spoiled mess. Your best bet might be to soak, activate and then cook. The cooked rice will keep longer than the soaked but uncooked rice.

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36 · August 20, 2011 at 10:17 PM

I'm not trying to be argumentative but could you supply a link to the claim for a 98% reduction in phytates from soaking? I always heard that soaking only minimally reduced phytates, maybe 20% or so. In fact I used to soak and then sprout just to the activated point where the end is swelling in order to further reduce phytates. It's a lot of work though.

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132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:40 PM

Wouldn't the fermentation do even more decreasing of the phytates etc?

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132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:37 PM

That is mainly what I was wondering was the shelf life before I cooked it.

B883e32a79f743ff8fee345567393074
132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:36 PM

Yes, im aware of the phytates. But i am soaking tgem, which according to guyenet, it should eventually decrease phytates by 98%.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874
1219 · August 20, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Right, but he is using SG's brown rice soaking method to make the nutrients more available.

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5 Answers

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2765 · August 20, 2011 at 8:40 PM

Ziplock bag, squeeze the air out, keep in fridge. I'm not going to make suggestions about the kind of rice or any other grain to use or not use... that is your choice. But that's how to keep it. As long as it doesn't ferment you are good to go.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37
15003 · August 20, 2011 at 11:13 PM

Rice freezes nicely, so I agree with the idea to cook, then portion it. It will last longer in the freezer if you vacuum seal it, but you probably don't need to worry about this for the amount you make in an average-sized rice cooker. BTW, if you haven't, try making your rice with bone broth to increase its nutrients.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29
2765 · August 22, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Freezing... yep, that's a good choice too.

B883e32a79f743ff8fee345567393074
132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:40 PM

Wouldn't the fermentation do even more decreasing of the phytates etc?

Ff37161b496b37a83d5f2b9d2ba2b876
36 · August 20, 2011 at 10:20 PM

Yes, but fermentation is hard to control unless you have a fairly steady and well maintained temperature. Random fermentation is likely to give you a half fermented and half spoiled mess. Your best bet might be to soak, activate and then cook. The cooked rice will keep longer than the soaked but uncooked rice.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874
1219 · August 21, 2011 at 3:54 AM

Cooking in cinnamon infused coconut cream/milk is also a great way to prepare rice.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29
2765 · August 22, 2011 at 5:23 PM

fermentation decreasing phytates? Hmmmm....probably. I didn't think of that. I just don't eat fermented foods. If I were going to make sake maybe... but I don't make that either. fermented = spoiled to me.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874
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1219 · August 20, 2011 at 7:34 PM

I'm sure a good commercial vacuum sealer would do the trick, allowing you to keep the rice for maybe a week or so. Otherwise you would be better off buying haiga rice, which has the bran removed but the germ is still intact. It is the middle ground between brown and white.

B883e32a79f743ff8fee345567393074
132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:37 PM

That is mainly what I was wondering was the shelf life before I cooked it.

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95 · August 21, 2011 at 7:20 AM

I see fm the post above that 2 weeks seems to be the optimum refrigerated storage time for the liquid. As it takes time [stages] to get to the 'accelerator' point, is there any reason why the liquid cant be frozen if it's not going to be used within the 2 weeks, and then just defrosted and used? would any of its fementation qualities get damaged by a freezing/defrosting process? any experience with this?

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560
459 · August 22, 2011 at 5:17 PM

Yeast and bacteria don't particularly like to be frozen. When they freeze their cell walls rupture, resulting in death. Commercial yeast strains (bread, beer, wine yeasts) are frozen in a highly controled environment, and still suffer some damage from the process, namely "leaky" cell walls.

42f33b23ca2b7c788bdd85afe6bb9dde
95 · August 23, 2011 at 8:41 PM

Wonderful explanation. thanks, Alex. Great to get clear cut answers.

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459 · August 21, 2011 at 2:51 AM

I too use SG's fermented rice technique. If I don't have time to cook it right away, I just pour off the liquid and stick it in the fridge (still in the mason jar that I use to ferment). In my experience it stays good for a long time. At about 2 weeks it will start developing off flavors.

In addition, the cooked rice lasts well in the fridge. I ususally cook up more than I need, then use it to stir-fry throughout the week.

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36 · August 20, 2011 at 7:42 PM

Brown rice contains a high level of phytates which bind to the minerals and cause them to pass through your body without being absorbed.

So, in a laboratory sense brown rice has more nutrients. But white rice will often have more usable nutrients even though in an absolute sense the nutrient level is fairly low.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874
1219 · August 20, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Right, but he is using SG's brown rice soaking method to make the nutrients more available.

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560
459 · August 21, 2011 at 3:02 AM

Downvoted for not having read the link and SG's data.

B883e32a79f743ff8fee345567393074
132 · August 20, 2011 at 9:36 PM

Yes, im aware of the phytates. But i am soaking tgem, which according to guyenet, it should eventually decrease phytates by 98%.

Ff37161b496b37a83d5f2b9d2ba2b876
36 · August 20, 2011 at 10:17 PM

I'm not trying to be argumentative but could you supply a link to the claim for a 98% reduction in phytates from soaking? I always heard that soaking only minimally reduced phytates, maybe 20% or so. In fact I used to soak and then sprout just to the activated point where the end is swelling in order to further reduce phytates. It's a lot of work though.

B883e32a79f743ff8fee345567393074
132 · August 21, 2011 at 12:03 AM

Sorry, I was quoting guyenet and I misquoted him. He says after several times it can reach a 96% reduction in phytate.

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