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Crock Pot Beef Bone

by (5)
Updated about 9 hours ago
Created September 03, 2012 at 1:56 PM

I recently came upon a few pounds of grass-fed beef bones.

My friend told me that if I crockpot them on high for like 3 days, the bones will become soft and edible. Have any of you tried this? Could you give me the details of your experience? How long will I need to do it? Can I use tallow as a base? Should I use some water? Vinegar? I would like to hear from someone else's experience before trying it myself.

I haven't been able to find much by searching but I might just not be looking for the right keywords. I don't just want to make broth, I want to eat the bones.

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4266 · September 04, 2012 at 8:33 PM

What happens to the bones? They just sit there, I guess. I've seen recipes that have you reuse the bones again and again. I don't usually do that. I just don't like the way it tastes after a while and I don't like the way it tastes to add vinegar to dissolve more of the bone. I've tossed in a tomato for a little acidity, but that's as far as I go on that.

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11048 · September 04, 2012 at 1:30 AM

It's easier to dissolve chicken bones into broth. I don't know how long you would have to cook beef bones to make them soft enough to eat and, in all honesty, I don't know why you would need to. The minerals are leached from the bones while they cook.

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11048 · September 04, 2012 at 12:53 AM

I discard the bones. They are stripped clean, but not soft.

Medium avatar
19479 · September 03, 2012 at 11:55 PM

Even Osedax, the "bone eating worm", goes for the fat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osedax). For what reason would you want to eat the bone itself? If you want some animal based calcium, you could pulverize some egg shells and eat them.

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5 · September 03, 2012 at 10:06 PM

Does this soften the bones enough to eat? I roasted my bones for an hour and now I'm crockpoting them. I want to eat the bones though.

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5 · September 03, 2012 at 10:04 PM

I want to eat the entire bone

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5 · September 03, 2012 at 8:11 PM

What happens to the bones when you do this?

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5201 · September 03, 2012 at 7:40 PM

+1 for the yummy looking pics.

Medium avatar
19479 · September 03, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Meat jello is where it's at :D

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3661 · September 03, 2012 at 2:26 PM

If you're going for serious bone broth, add a little vinegar, a lot of water, and let them simmer 24 to 72 hours. Don't add vegetables early in the process; they tend to get bitter. You won't really need a base (you mentioned tallow) it will take care of itself.

Since the bones are what you're after, cooking this too long isn't much of a concern, other than you don't want it to dry out and burn, off course. Check as you go to see when they get soft enough.

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19479 · September 03, 2012 at 6:18 PM

Its funny that this question came up as I just cooked up some marrow bones in a crock pot.

They were selling grass-fed beef bones for 2.99/lb at Whole Foods so I picked up a couple lbs.

If you JUST want to eat the marrow, I suggest simply roasting them in the oven (450 for ~15-20 minutes).

crock-pot-beef-bone

You could then spoon it out and eat it straight up, or, spread it on something. I made some coconut flour and organic red palm oil bread, toasted it, and spread it with marrow and a parsley/radish/lemon juice/EVOO salad. It was a party in my mouth.

crock-pot-beef-bone

(Full marrow and coconut bread recipe here)

If you're set on using a crock pot, however, I would suggest taking the bones...

crock-pot-beef-bone

And some beef (I used a grass-fed 3lb beef chuck shoulder roast that was on sale at Whole Foods for $3.99/lb woot woot!)...

crock-pot-beef-bone

Smear the roast with bacon fat and sear it on all sides...

crock-pot-beef-bone

Then, toss the roast, the bones, 10 cloves of garlic, 2 cups of previously made meat jello (ie. cold bone broth), dried herbs (rosemary, parsley, and thyme), and a water into your crock pot...

crock-pot-beef-bone

Set it on "low" and forget about it for awhile (I let mine go about 16 hours total). By then the roast will be falling apart and the marrow and connective tissue will have melted into the broth which you can sop up with the shredded meat.

crock-pot-beef-bone

(Full "Bones & Beef" recipe here)

Medium avatar
19479 · September 03, 2012 at 11:55 PM

Even Osedax, the "bone eating worm", goes for the fat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osedax). For what reason would you want to eat the bone itself? If you want some animal based calcium, you could pulverize some egg shells and eat them.

4c61b429aaf2eff6e794bea90461487c
5 · September 03, 2012 at 10:04 PM

I want to eat the entire bone

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e
5201 · September 03, 2012 at 7:40 PM

+1 for the yummy looking pics.

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4266 · September 03, 2012 at 2:11 PM

I crock pot them on low for about a day. I only use water, a little wine and salt. I don't like how it tastes with vinegar or cooked all to hell. My meat market sells soup bones that have some meat on them, lots of cartilage and connective tissue, and a ball joint that has been cut in quarters. I also throw in a pig's foot. I pour the broth into glass jars and in the fridge the fat goes to the top. I can save that for cooking. The broth turns into beef jello. So good! I save all the meat and make burrito bowls or whatever.

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4266 · September 04, 2012 at 8:33 PM

What happens to the bones? They just sit there, I guess. I've seen recipes that have you reuse the bones again and again. I don't usually do that. I just don't like the way it tastes after a while and I don't like the way it tastes to add vinegar to dissolve more of the bone. I've tossed in a tomato for a little acidity, but that's as far as I go on that.

4c61b429aaf2eff6e794bea90461487c
5 · September 03, 2012 at 8:11 PM

What happens to the bones when you do this?

Medium avatar
19479 · September 03, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Meat jello is where it's at :D

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0 · June 01, 2013 at 3:23 PM

Pressure cook the bones, they grt real soft if you want to eat the b ones.

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11048 · September 03, 2012 at 10:02 PM

I made broth jello over the weekend. I filled the crock pot with beef knuckle bones and feet, then covered with water and cooked on low for 36 hours. I let it cool enough to handle, removed the scum off the top, pulled out the bones, strained through a colander, then strained again through a fine mesh sieve. I put it in the fridge and once the fat hardened, removed it. It gave me 8 cups of beautiful jello.

I was too lazy this time to roast the bones, but when I do it, I put them in the oven for about an hour, or until the house smells like roast beast, then throw everything in the crock pot in the manner above. I discovered I like the flavor better without any veggies or vinegar in the mix. I've never tried it with wine; I'll bet a nice red would taste good.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23
11048 · September 04, 2012 at 1:30 AM

It's easier to dissolve chicken bones into broth. I don't know how long you would have to cook beef bones to make them soft enough to eat and, in all honesty, I don't know why you would need to. The minerals are leached from the bones while they cook.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23
11048 · September 04, 2012 at 12:53 AM

I discard the bones. They are stripped clean, but not soft.

4c61b429aaf2eff6e794bea90461487c
5 · September 03, 2012 at 10:06 PM

Does this soften the bones enough to eat? I roasted my bones for an hour and now I'm crockpoting them. I want to eat the bones though.

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15400 · September 03, 2012 at 2:11 PM

I have a Kenwood slow cooker. I don't know how to do it but I know HOW NOT TO DO IT.

There are two settings - high and low. Use high, don't use low (I used low and it was a mistake). I let it simmer for 24 hours - don't do it, I overcooked it. I'd say 8 hours would be enough.

Good luck!

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