7e7aefadfbe6648e244722e6df91d00a
6

Is asthma-inducing exercise detrimental to the overall health of lung tissues?

by (40)
Updated about 22 hours ago
Created December 12, 2011 at 8:40 PM

Since asthma is essentially inflammation, and we know that chronic inflammation can lead to cancers of the inflamed tissues and assorted other ills, is it advisable, from the perspective of pulmonary health, for someone with exercise-induced asthma to engage in regular, intensive exercise? Obviously not exercising at all has its own risks, but I'm sort of uncomfortable with the idea that I'm inducing inflammation of the lungs on a tri-weekly basis when I do HIIT.

Is there any evidence that exercise-induced asthma, or asthma in general, is something that can be "worked through"? Put another way, can stressing your lungs on a regular basis to the point of asthma activation spur your lung tissues to somehow become desensitized and not so likely to inflame when confronted with a similar level of stress?

Medium avatar
8239 · December 13, 2011 at 9:23 PM

Fantastic news Josh.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
7275 · December 13, 2011 at 9:10 PM

I should clarify: I'm not skeptical that an individual can or has overcome their asthma, I'm skeptical of specific claims that if you do X, it will make your asthma go away.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
7275 · December 13, 2011 at 4:44 PM

Similar PH question: http://paleohacks.com/questions/6307/did-your-asthma-improve-after-switching-to-paleo

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · December 13, 2011 at 12:20 AM

@jordan~ You can get it tested at via your doc or the Vitamin D Council has an at-home test kit you can order on their site: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org. Most folk need at *least* 1000 IUs per 25 lbs of body weight per day to maintain a level between 50-80 ng/ml. You should get tested and supplement accordingly. Try sea salt instead of normal table salt.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · December 13, 2011 at 12:17 AM

@Sara~ I don't absorb much from the sun, as I have a dark complexion and am older (48). It's all supplementation and food. I take 8,000 IUs per day to maintain that level.

7e7aefadfbe6648e244722e6df91d00a
40 · December 12, 2011 at 9:18 PM

Is the 80-90 ng/ml a blood concentration level? How do you test for that? I take 1000 IU of Vit D and a magnesium/calcium supplement each day, so hopefully I'll see the same positive results you've seen! I also remember reading in Cordain that both the sodium and chlorine components of table salt can aggravate asthma symptoms, so I stopped shaking salt on my food while cooking.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
7275 · December 12, 2011 at 9:14 PM

Dragonfly, that's awesome. Do you keep your vitamin D levels that high through supplementation or increased sun/UV exposure, or both? Both times I've been tested for vitamin D (years apart), I was at 33 ng/ml.

  • Total Views
    1.3K
  • Recent Activity
    66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2
  • Last Activity
    96D AGO
  • Followers
    0

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

6 Answers

best answer

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
2
32518 · December 12, 2011 at 9:09 PM

I can't answer your question personally, though I know of some folks who have worked through exercise-induced asthma.

I can say that my exercise-induced asthma (and all other asthma symptoms) disappears completely when I keep my Vitamin D level high 80-90 ng/ml. I take 200-400 mg Magnesium as well.

7e7aefadfbe6648e244722e6df91d00a
40 · December 12, 2011 at 9:18 PM

Is the 80-90 ng/ml a blood concentration level? How do you test for that? I take 1000 IU of Vit D and a magnesium/calcium supplement each day, so hopefully I'll see the same positive results you've seen! I also remember reading in Cordain that both the sodium and chlorine components of table salt can aggravate asthma symptoms, so I stopped shaking salt on my food while cooking.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · December 13, 2011 at 12:17 AM

@Sara~ I don't absorb much from the sun, as I have a dark complexion and am older (48). It's all supplementation and food. I take 8,000 IUs per day to maintain that level.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab
32518 · December 13, 2011 at 12:20 AM

@jordan~ You can get it tested at via your doc or the Vitamin D Council has an at-home test kit you can order on their site: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org. Most folk need at *least* 1000 IUs per 25 lbs of body weight per day to maintain a level between 50-80 ng/ml. You should get tested and supplement accordingly. Try sea salt instead of normal table salt.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
7275 · December 12, 2011 at 9:14 PM

Dragonfly, that's awesome. Do you keep your vitamin D levels that high through supplementation or increased sun/UV exposure, or both? Both times I've been tested for vitamin D (years apart), I was at 33 ng/ml.

3281242a98428c87bd1dbc9c4203557f
2
20 · December 12, 2011 at 11:17 PM

Through trial-and-error I have observed that I have significantly more difficulty breathing during exercise, and a lot of phlegm produced during that exercise, if my diet happens to contain certain foods. Dairy was the biggest troublemaker (I can handle butter but other dairy makes things bad). Bananas and peanuts also made things worse but to a lesser extent than dairy. It took me a very long time to make these connections and then I kept testing them anyway because I wanted to be sure before I eliminated some of my favourite foods! But it's been worth it. Everybody's different, food intolerance may not be your problem but it's just something to consider.

And just fyi, it didn't matter WHEN I exercised relative to consuming dairy - it could be an hour later or a day later, it impacted my breathing during the exercise. I had to be off dairy for several days before I noticed improvements.

164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853
1
495 · December 13, 2011 at 3:23 PM

I too have EIA & have found that the more I exercise (over the years), the better it becomes. If I'm sick/injured for a prolonged period of time (ie, when i was injured & couldn't run for nearly 2 mos), it came back, but not more severe.

To me it's like I'm exercising my lungs as well, the more i use them, the healthier they become. The less I use them, the harder it is to breathe (during intense exercise). HTH

724ba4f39f7bbea7f74b45c0a79615f2
1
1968 · December 13, 2011 at 2:57 PM

I have exercise and allergy induced asthma. I find, like Sara S., that taking my albuterol right before I exercise is key, because there's no point in going for a run if you're going to crap out half way through and need to walk the asthma away. But I definitely find that doing a lot of exercise helps prevent my allergic asthma (i.e., when I exercise often enough, I don't need to use albuterol except right before exercise, like in the middle of the night the way I usually do in the winter).

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2
1
11111 · December 13, 2011 at 2:50 PM

My son, who is now 14, has not had an asthma episode in over 4 years now since we went Paleo. He does not take meds of any kind and he had taken multiple meds since he was 6 months old, he used to be hospitalized every 4-5 months for weeks at a time because his asthma was so bad. Now he is normal and healthy and his doctor is amazed, he still gets checked once a year but as far as his doctor is concerned he is basically 'cured'. He does get lots of Vit D and a few other supplements.

Medium avatar
8239 · December 13, 2011 at 9:23 PM

Fantastic news Josh.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
1
7275 · December 12, 2011 at 9:12 PM

From personal experience, I think the lack of oxygen from exercising with exercise-induced asthma (or otherwise) can cause problems. I have heard anecdotes of people overcoming asthma, but I'm skeptical it can be done in general. One of my friends had good luck overcoming childhood asthma with ayurvedic medicine. I've also heard people use hookworms to overcome asthma, but I haven't seen any clinical trials on it.

What I do is take my albuterol before exercising if I can tell I'll need it. I found that when I didn't manage my asthma with albuterol, I just had more and more trouble. You don't want to be on a bikeride away from home and not be able to breath anymore.

I've also found a paleo diet to help, presumably by reducing inflammation in general.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242
7275 · December 13, 2011 at 9:10 PM

I should clarify: I'm not skeptical that an individual can or has overcome their asthma, I'm skeptical of specific claims that if you do X, it will make your asthma go away.

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account

Get Free Paleo Recipes