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How Much Protein per day?

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Updated about 2 hours ago
Created April 07, 2014 at 2:33 PM

I currently cook up a 500g pack of Beef mince .. per 100g it is 19.0g of protein, but after cooking it weights about 350g so am I getting 66.5g of protein (after cooking weight) or 95g of protein per day (pack weight)

In a nutshell I guess I am saying is any protein lost through cooking or is it just fat?

I feel like I am eating too much protein.

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397 · April 08, 2014 at 4:16 PM

Many people would not consider that a lot. And indeed you could very well make the case that the average paleo dieter and to the average american that is not a large amount of protein. However, I am referring only to the amount of protein your body needs. If we're talking strictly what you need to satisfy your protein requirements, then 500g (about 1.1 lbs) of beef is more than sufficient. You could very well eat more than that, but it might result in adverse effects in the long term.

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 08, 2014 at 2:51 PM

definitely not an athlete .. but I never thought 500g would be too much meat for paleo folks :)

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 07, 2014 at 4:16 PM

I weigh 150lbs . Thanks for your answer

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397 · April 07, 2014 at 3:37 PM

Yeah, that sounds like more protein than you need, assuming you're not an athlete that is.

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 07, 2014 at 3:14 PM

Thanks :) So I am eating too much protein then!

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6 Answers

5f2b8e0a671b7eaae8a6bd97f0ded166
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105 · April 19, 2014 at 6:14 PM

Muscle meat is very high in phosphorus and very low in calcium.

If you are relying on muscle meat as main protein source, you

may need extra calcium from rest of the diet to balance the ratio

of calcium to phosphorus. RDA from calcium is 1000 mg and

Phosphorus 700 mg and it is a good ratio.

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17073 · April 09, 2014 at 10:18 AM

There's a simple formula. Between 0.8-1.2g of protein per pound of lean body mass. On the lower end if you don't work out with weights, on the higher end if you do.

This number is the number of grams of protein you'd eat per day, however, that doesn't directly translate into portions of meat. So, you'd need to multiply this by 3 if what you're eating is lean chicken breast, or by 4 if it's beef or other red meats. Now you have the number of grams of meat.

A quick shortcut to this is eat 3 palm sized portions of meat per day. Why? Because humans come in a range of sizes and palms generally don't store much fat. Larger, muscular guys will have bigger palms because the muscles in the palms will be larger (accounting for the workout variation) and the bone structure accounting for the body size. (Smaller guys will have smaller palms, so it turns out it's a good approximation.)

These measures are for raw meat, not cooked meat. Meat contains protein, fats, water, connective tissue, and sometimes bones. Cooking only gets rid of some of the water and a little bit of the fat. The protein remains. Remember, meat is between 25%-33% protein. So don't think you're getting too much.

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690 · April 07, 2014 at 10:54 PM

Gender, age, weight, body fat % or lean muscle mass & activity level all drive your protein requirements.

Without any info other than 95g of protein consumed... any answer would be a SWAG.

My SWAG you're with 25g of the 'right number' depending factors above.

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41341 · April 07, 2014 at 10:12 PM

Using protein for energy is a waste of a nutrient. Excess protein beyond what is needed for growth and regeneration is converted to energy, and expensive pee. Generally folks need a small amount 50-70 g daily for nitrogen balance.

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245 · April 07, 2014 at 3:32 PM

The upper end I see for protein recommendations tend to be from what I can tell 35% by calories or 1gram per pound of lean body weight. So as long as you don't weight under 95 pounds you're probably not getting too much protein, and if you are under 95 pounds you probably have much more significant health issues than your protein intake. :D

Note: This does not apply if you have kidney issues. ( See doctor if this applies )

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 07, 2014 at 4:16 PM

I weigh 150lbs . Thanks for your answer

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397 · April 07, 2014 at 2:40 PM

Protein is not lost, it coagulates (which is why cooked meat is harder than raw meat). What you are losing is mostly water, don't forget that animal cells are composed primarily of water. Cooking forces a lot of the water out of the meat (cells), which is why if you overcook something it tastes dry. If you want to keep more of the water in the food, just cook it at a lower temperature and less of it will evaporate from the food. The fat losses occur from the fat trimmings around the meat that drip into the pan when you cook it. So no, no protein is lost, you are getting all the protein that was in that initial 500g of ground beef, since protein does not melt or evaporate.

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 08, 2014 at 2:51 PM

definitely not an athlete .. but I never thought 500g would be too much meat for paleo folks :)

2c612e3bf373ce2fca02eb2652e8b632
0 · April 07, 2014 at 3:14 PM

Thanks :) So I am eating too much protein then!

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