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Leptin Resistance and when to eat in the morning

by (10919)
Updated September 16, 2014 at 7:25 PM
Created June 24, 2011 at 10:21 PM

I just have a quick question. So I usually wake up around 4:30am and then around 6:30 to nurse my baby. We co-sleep so I don't have to really get up but sometimes during the 6:30 feeding I wake up really zippy but force myself to go back to sleep anyway. I am trying out Dr. K's Leptin program but I usually eat the 50 grams of protein around 9AM when the baby and I wake up and actually get up.

I'm wondering, the first time I wake up around 6:30 and when I get that zippy feeling, is that cortisol and therefore I should be eating then? Or can I continue to wait till we both wake up together and still get the benefit?

I don't really want to get up at 6:30AM to eat because I have interrupted sleep as it is nursing a baby, but I also want to take care of this inflammation issue I'm having because my most recent blood test showed a high CRP reading.

thoughts? Am I over-thinking this?

Dbc43080bf9381864f5c6910e1264677
176 · August 29, 2012 at 6:58 PM

have you considered Maca powder to level out your hormones? If not, check it out.

16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b
2640 · August 11, 2011 at 11:25 PM

Dr. K - can you give a sample breakfast that contains the correct amount of protein?

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3
827 · June 26, 2011 at 5:34 AM

Hmmm, getting the hormones sorted out isn't going to happen with my HMO (Kaiser) - as far as I can tell, they don't do bio-identical hormone therapy. So I'll have to wait and find another solution. I guess I'll abandon this particular stage for now. While I have poor sleep, I don't have carb cravings, and I'm hardly ever very hungry, and IF is easy for me. I'll still stick to three meals, no snacking, as much of a gap as possible between dinner and bedtime. We've also blocked the bedroom window from any light and sound.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 26, 2011 at 2:41 AM

well... My kid comfort nurses at will all night. Hahahahaha so I think I've got that one covered tenfold.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 11:10 PM

oxytocin progesterone and eating all blunt AM cortisol......in a leptin sensitive person. At night melatonin and oxytocin are among the best ways to reduce a high PM cortisol. A good sign of high PM cortisols are hunger post dinner, consistent poor sleep, and weight plateaus. Eating carbs and protein as a LR person will elevate it. I mention on this site many times over I use nipple massage to increase oxytocin. Lactation also does the same.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 11:02 PM

if your other hormones are out of balance get them optimized too.....then you will see some magic.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 10:03 PM

I think I have less interest in sex at 6:30 in the morning than the 50 grams of protein!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 10:01 PM

Personally, I'm allergic to egg whites, but it would be awesome if there were a shake I could drink. Unfortunately whey protein doesn't work either. It's be nice to just whip up a protein shake instead of something hearty in the AM.

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3
827 · June 25, 2011 at 7:28 PM

Dubious of the whole levy? IE: none of it's true? Let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater! Sex is know to reduce cortisol. I wonder if it's duration dependent? Maybe it should be sex for girls, and steak for the boys? http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/group/MestonLAB/Publications/JSM_hamilton_et_al_Cortisol.pdf

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10919 · June 25, 2011 at 7:09 PM

Sleep is good. Remind me what it is again???

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107
15583 · June 25, 2011 at 6:42 PM

Won't a dose of protein stimulate cortisol in itself?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 6:06 PM

CRP level have maybe not been tested in breastfeeding mothers. There are lots of things that no one has gotten around to looking at yet.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:57 PM

I don't know but I suspect that trying to lower your CRP level while breastfeeding all the time will be difficult. It is naturally a stressfull time on your body.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:53 PM

Maybe it's just me but extra sleep always comes first :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:52 PM

Maybe it's just be but extra sleep always comes first :)

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107
15583 · June 25, 2011 at 5:49 PM

Agreed Ben, the cortisol=bad, so eat to reduce cortisol idea seems distinctly dubious...

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10919 · June 25, 2011 at 5:46 PM

I actually have the appetite of a Siberian tiger right now so I have no issues with eating that much first thing in the morning. I was just wondering theoretically if I should wait or not, also I'm tired and don't always feel like physically getting up to PEE much less eat, has nothing to do with my hunger hahahahaha. I really don't take anything he or anyone else here as fact. I'm just experimenting. If it doesn't work after a while I'll try something different.

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10919 · June 25, 2011 at 5:41 PM

Oh I'm just experimenting. I don't think eating a 8 ounces of beef first thing in the morning is going to cause any long term problems. :-) I've got a lot of weight to lose and I don't mind playing around with other people's hacks. If it doesn't work after 6-8 weeks like he promises I'll try something else. I'm not really taking anything as fact at this point in my journey.

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15966 · June 25, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Hmm, I would have thought that that would have been tested, yes. Darn. I wish I had something more helpful to contribute. Perhaps if one had a CRP from pre-pregnancy that they could then compare to the post-birth/current CRP. In a perfect world, right?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Hmm, I would have thought that that would have been tested, yes. Darn. I wish I had something more helpful to contribute.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 1:59 PM

I'm glad others are chiming in as to the possible dubiousness of this whole levee thing. There are people who are very willing to follow advice on this site. I have to say that I honestly feel it somewhat irresponsible to portray theories as fact while knowing that there are those who will follow the instructions to the letter.

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10919 · June 25, 2011 at 1:44 PM

I don't know. I was wondering the same thing about crop And the stress of new motherhood but I coulndt find anything that correlated breastfeeding or post partum recovery with higher Crp. Maybe it's just never been tested. I don't know.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 1:41 PM

I was wondering about the oxytocin thing in this context too. Hmmm

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628
3631 · June 25, 2011 at 12:40 PM

And furthermore, if AshleyRoze is breastfeeding at her 6:30 wake-up, won't **the oxytocin inhibit the release of cortisol**?? It's rather counter-intuitive to tell someone who wishes to lose weight to get out of bed and eat a boat-load, just to lie back down again.. with the intention of suppressing a hormone that is ostensibly being naturally suppressed. Hard for me to swallow, so to speak.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 11:59 AM

sleep in context? What the hell is that supposed to mean? And what is wrong with cortisol spiking in the morning upon waking anyhow? Is this not the natural default mode? Isn't our cortisol supposed to be high upon waking, it serves as the energy boost to get us up and at em, no? Before coffee and other stimulants, cortisol was it, no? Shouldn't cortisol be high in the morning and then gradually taper off throughout the day? Why in the world would you want to seek to eliminate the elevated morning cortisol? Be wary with what you read, everyone. Be wary of levees.

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3
1801 · June 25, 2011 at 8:11 AM

I' still co-sleeping with my DS (2) and was wondering the same thing.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 4:14 AM

@free any biochemistry or endocrine book explains this effect.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 4:13 AM

grenedine sleep is vital but it must be in context.......I just got finsihed writing about the sleep levee tonight.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 4:12 AM

lol..................

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
566 · June 25, 2011 at 4:11 AM

Indeed. I think my problem is time: I am unwilling to get up any earlier to eat. As it is, my schedule barely allows for 7 hours of sleep. I'm caught between the proverbial rock and hard place, so I compromise and eat later. I may try a slab of leftover steak or something next week and see how that goes.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628
3631 · June 25, 2011 at 3:19 AM

Also, I thought I read something somewhere that eating early breakfast ends up making one wake up earlier, because your body wants to eat 2 hours after waking, so it will adjust accordingly. But I don't know where I got that.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628
3631 · June 25, 2011 at 3:17 AM

But isn't sleep really important too? Waking up to eat and then go back to bed sounds kind of weird to me. I wake up earlier than I'd like to all the time... then I roll over and go back to sleep so I can get my 8 hours.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195
16131 · June 25, 2011 at 3:00 AM

http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/oby2011108a.html http://www.drfields.com/Healthy-Breakfast.html maybe?

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1689 · June 25, 2011 at 2:28 AM

I've been looking for data on the effect of early-morning eating on cortisol, do you have a source/link?

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051
15229 · June 25, 2011 at 2:10 AM

sleep with the foreman grill next to your bed loaded up with bacon like michael scott.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 2:08 AM

Thanks, that's the answer I was looking for. I'll get up and eat. I usually get up for a glass of water after feeding the baby anyway. Might as well grind down some beef. hahaha

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 2:06 AM

Oh, I wasn't pissed. I'm just a tired mommy and want to pass out again after I nurse. :-) I'll grin and bear it and eat then crawl back in bed with the little one.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 1:43 AM

Timing is as important as what you eat......sound nuts I know.....but it is factual biochemically.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 1:30 AM

as soon as you wake your cortisol is thru the roof......trust me and eat ASAP. You will see if I am FOS. It will change everything. Read about sleep and metabolism being yoked. Im posting as fast as I can......

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 24, 2011 at 11:26 PM

If I were getting up and starting my day I could totally do it. My issue is that I wake up but I'm not physically getting up yet.

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6 Answers

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
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15966 · June 25, 2011 at 12:08 PM

Firstly, cheers to you for being a patient mom and nursing that little one on the fly, in bed, just being awoken and all. Awesome. I???m a guy so definitely take my crazytalk with many grains of salt.

You wake around 6:30am and have that zippy feeling. Why is this bad again? Waking up with an energetic feeling, which I have to assume is somewhat positive for you, is in what way something that is bad? Cortisol is supposed to elevated in the morning, upon rising. This is the natural energy-booster that is supposed to get us up and ready to do the day???s doings.

I understand you have the high CRP reading. Is this perhaps due to the stress you are going through naturally, from raising a child and all the night-waking, feeding, etc that goes along with it. Might that be a temporary, natural thing; and something that perhaps you are naturally suited to do?

I have to think that forcing 50 grams of protein down, when you clearly say you don???t want to get up to do, is less-than-necessary. While I am a big fan of protein and definitely wouldn???t tell you to not eat that much at a meal, I have to say that that???s a big amount of protein to get down upon waking. To give some sort of relative measure, elite lifters (girls and guys who are paid to work on physique) do not usually take that much protein immediately upon rising.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 6:06 PM

CRP level have maybe not been tested in breastfeeding mothers. There are lots of things that no one has gotten around to looking at yet.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107
15583 · June 25, 2011 at 5:49 PM

Agreed Ben, the cortisol=bad, so eat to reduce cortisol idea seems distinctly dubious...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Hmm, I would have thought that that would have been tested, yes. Darn. I wish I had something more helpful to contribute. Perhaps if one had a CRP from pre-pregnancy that they could then compare to the post-birth/current CRP. In a perfect world, right?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Hmm, I would have thought that that would have been tested, yes. Darn. I wish I had something more helpful to contribute.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 1:44 PM

I don't know. I was wondering the same thing about crop And the stress of new motherhood but I coulndt find anything that correlated breastfeeding or post partum recovery with higher Crp. Maybe it's just never been tested. I don't know.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
2
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:37 PM

You shoulud remember that Dr K is:

a) a man.

b) not breastfeeding a baby.

c) thinks he knows everything :)

I would suggest eating when you get up in the morning and not when woken to breastfeed, get your sleep. Babies grow quickly, you wont be breastfeeding through the night for that much longer in relative terms (even if it feel like a long time).

I think 50 grams of protein is just a arbitary number. Dr K is I think quite a big guy so it is probably easier for him to eat that much food. I would not want to eat that much soon after waking.

I think it is probably more the eating of food with some protein in that reduces the cortisol levels rather than a magic number of grams. The book Mastering Leptin that I read recently just recommends "Eat a breakfast containing protein" soon after getting up, such as eggs rather than one based mainly on carbohydrate. However even just eating a breakfast of cereal has been associated with lower cortisol levels :)


I just had a quick look if anyone has done a study on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in breastfeeding mothers and could not find anything. However there are three studies on CRP in lactating dairy cows, just for the curiosity value :)

Elevation of bovine serum C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component levels by lactation

From these observations, it was assumed that lactation might stimulate CRP synthesis rather than SAP synthesis in bovine liver as an acute phase reaction, and that CRP might be called a lactation-associated protein.

Study with long title

CRP blood serum levels show a distinct tendency to increase from the 2nd to the 20th week of lactation.

Serum C-reactive protein in dairy herds

C-reactive protein levels increased with milk production, peaking during high lactation (2 to 4 mo of pregnancy), and decreased when lactation ceased.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 7:09 PM

Sleep is good. Remind me what it is again???

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:57 PM

I don't know but I suspect that trying to lower your CRP level while breastfeeding all the time will be difficult. It is naturally a stressfull time on your body.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:53 PM

Maybe it's just me but extra sleep always comes first :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb
19220 · June 25, 2011 at 5:52 PM

Maybe it's just be but extra sleep always comes first :)

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 5:46 PM

I actually have the appetite of a Siberian tiger right now so I have no issues with eating that much first thing in the morning. I was just wondering theoretically if I should wait or not, also I'm tired and don't always feel like physically getting up to PEE much less eat, has nothing to do with my hunger hahahahaha. I really don't take anything he or anyone else here as fact. I'm just experimenting. If it doesn't work after a while I'll try something different.

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1
827 · June 25, 2011 at 4:59 AM

I've been trying to do the leptin reset, but I'm perimenopausal, and I'm waking up 2 to 3 times a night due to hot flashes. I can't see how getting up and eating 3.5 hours after I fell asleep is going to help at all. If I do get up and eat, then I can't go back to bed for 3.5 to 4 hours based on the amount of time required between eating and sleeping, and by then, well, it's too late, cause I've got to get ready for work.

I've been letting myself go back to sleep after one hot flash, but when I wake up again, I get up and eat. As such, I've gone from sleeping (in general) 6.5 to 7 hours a night to less than 5.

How do most people manage this?

8 hours sleep 1 hour wake/eat/prep for work (this is pushing it) 1 hour commute time 9 hours at work time 1 hour commute time 1 hour cook/eat time And now I have only 3 hours left before I have to be back asleep again. Just shy of what's necessary.

And this assumes no bad traffic, no after work errands, etc.

Is it better just to skip dinner, instead?

Dbc43080bf9381864f5c6910e1264677
176 · August 29, 2012 at 6:58 PM

have you considered Maca powder to level out your hormones? If not, check it out.

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3
827 · June 26, 2011 at 5:34 AM

Hmmm, getting the hormones sorted out isn't going to happen with my HMO (Kaiser) - as far as I can tell, they don't do bio-identical hormone therapy. So I'll have to wait and find another solution. I guess I'll abandon this particular stage for now. While I have poor sleep, I don't have carb cravings, and I'm hardly ever very hungry, and IF is easy for me. I'll still stick to three meals, no snacking, as much of a gap as possible between dinner and bedtime. We've also blocked the bedroom window from any light and sound.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 11:02 PM

if your other hormones are out of balance get them optimized too.....then you will see some magic.

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0
3014 · June 25, 2011 at 9:36 PM

What about using an albumin shake in the morning to try to get to that 50 grams.

The product contains powdered egg yolk and biotin.

Also a question for Dr. K. Seems logical that a big man and a small woman don't both need 50 gm. So what amount is appropriate for a short woman - say 5' 1" - but will still be effective? 45? 40? 35?

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10919 · June 25, 2011 at 10:01 PM

Personally, I'm allergic to egg whites, but it would be awesome if there were a shake I could drink. Unfortunately whey protein doesn't work either. It's be nice to just whip up a protein shake instead of something hearty in the AM.

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566 · June 24, 2011 at 11:24 PM

I've no solution, but a similar issue. I wake at 4:30ish in order to catch a bus by 5:30 and I really am not in the mood to eat. I tried my 50 g of protein a couple of days this week and felt horrible. On the other hand, this morning I tried eating my first meal at 7:30 when I arrived at work and was full and craving free until lunch. I've no idea how it will work with leptin reset, but I'm going to continue it for a while and see how it goes.

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6
566 · June 25, 2011 at 4:11 AM

Indeed. I think my problem is time: I am unwilling to get up any earlier to eat. As it is, my schedule barely allows for 7 hours of sleep. I'm caught between the proverbial rock and hard place, so I compromise and eat later. I may try a slab of leftover steak or something next week and see how that goes.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 24, 2011 at 11:26 PM

If I were getting up and starting my day I could totally do it. My issue is that I wake up but I'm not physically getting up yet.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
-1
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 1:42 AM

Eating as soon as you rise is designed to destroy your AM cortisol level. It is not done to piss you off. It's based purely upon our hormone status. Once you get in that groove you will see some amazing benefits for a paleo lifestyle.......try it. If it does not work blow it off.....but try it. Dont let convention dictate terms. When you wake.....eat the protein and fat.

16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b
2640 · August 11, 2011 at 11:25 PM

Dr. K - can you give a sample breakfast that contains the correct amount of protein?

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 26, 2011 at 2:41 AM

well... My kid comfort nurses at will all night. Hahahahaha so I think I've got that one covered tenfold.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 11:10 PM

oxytocin progesterone and eating all blunt AM cortisol......in a leptin sensitive person. At night melatonin and oxytocin are among the best ways to reduce a high PM cortisol. A good sign of high PM cortisols are hunger post dinner, consistent poor sleep, and weight plateaus. Eating carbs and protein as a LR person will elevate it. I mention on this site many times over I use nipple massage to increase oxytocin. Lactation also does the same.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 10:03 PM

I think I have less interest in sex at 6:30 in the morning than the 50 grams of protein!

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3
827 · June 25, 2011 at 7:28 PM

Dubious of the whole levy? IE: none of it's true? Let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater! Sex is know to reduce cortisol. I wonder if it's duration dependent? Maybe it should be sex for girls, and steak for the boys? http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/group/MestonLAB/Publications/JSM_hamilton_et_al_Cortisol.pdf

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107
15583 · June 25, 2011 at 6:42 PM

Won't a dose of protein stimulate cortisol in itself?

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 5:41 PM

Oh I'm just experimenting. I don't think eating a 8 ounces of beef first thing in the morning is going to cause any long term problems. :-) I've got a lot of weight to lose and I don't mind playing around with other people's hacks. If it doesn't work after 6-8 weeks like he promises I'll try something else. I'm not really taking anything as fact at this point in my journey.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 1:59 PM

I'm glad others are chiming in as to the possible dubiousness of this whole levee thing. There are people who are very willing to follow advice on this site. I have to say that I honestly feel it somewhat irresponsible to portray theories as fact while knowing that there are those who will follow the instructions to the letter.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 1:41 PM

I was wondering about the oxytocin thing in this context too. Hmmm

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3631 · June 25, 2011 at 12:40 PM

And furthermore, if AshleyRoze is breastfeeding at her 6:30 wake-up, won't **the oxytocin inhibit the release of cortisol**?? It's rather counter-intuitive to tell someone who wishes to lose weight to get out of bed and eat a boat-load, just to lie back down again.. with the intention of suppressing a hormone that is ostensibly being naturally suppressed. Hard for me to swallow, so to speak.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15966 · June 25, 2011 at 11:59 AM

sleep in context? What the hell is that supposed to mean? And what is wrong with cortisol spiking in the morning upon waking anyhow? Is this not the natural default mode? Isn't our cortisol supposed to be high upon waking, it serves as the energy boost to get us up and at em, no? Before coffee and other stimulants, cortisol was it, no? Shouldn't cortisol be high in the morning and then gradually taper off throughout the day? Why in the world would you want to seek to eliminate the elevated morning cortisol? Be wary with what you read, everyone. Be wary of levees.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 4:14 AM

@free any biochemistry or endocrine book explains this effect.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 4:13 AM

grenedine sleep is vital but it must be in context.......I just got finsihed writing about the sleep levee tonight.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628
3631 · June 25, 2011 at 3:19 AM

Also, I thought I read something somewhere that eating early breakfast ends up making one wake up earlier, because your body wants to eat 2 hours after waking, so it will adjust accordingly. But I don't know where I got that.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628
3631 · June 25, 2011 at 3:17 AM

But isn't sleep really important too? Waking up to eat and then go back to bed sounds kind of weird to me. I wake up earlier than I'd like to all the time... then I roll over and go back to sleep so I can get my 8 hours.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195
16131 · June 25, 2011 at 3:00 AM

http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/oby2011108a.html http://www.drfields.com/Healthy-Breakfast.html maybe?

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18
1689 · June 25, 2011 at 2:28 AM

I've been looking for data on the effect of early-morning eating on cortisol, do you have a source/link?

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f
10919 · June 25, 2011 at 2:06 AM

Oh, I wasn't pissed. I'm just a tired mommy and want to pass out again after I nurse. :-) I'll grin and bear it and eat then crawl back in bed with the little one.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117
25467 · June 25, 2011 at 1:43 AM

Timing is as important as what you eat......sound nuts I know.....but it is factual biochemically.

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