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Thoughts on this article?

by (1467)
Updated September 29, 2014 at 3:59 AM
Created June 20, 2013 at 10:09 AM

What aspects would you take from this article and what would you discard?

More tea/fish/less stress/fermented soy?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jun/19/japanese-diet-live-to-100

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41341 · June 20, 2013 at 2:37 PM

Even if the 'blue zone' thing is a myth, there are lessons to be learned from those cultures. And as for the correlation between health care and longevity, sort of a no-brainer. At least on the low-end of health care availability that's true, but the correlation gets more tenuous as health care becomes more and more available.

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717 · June 20, 2013 at 2:19 PM

"They eat three servings of fish a week, on average ... plenty of whole grains." What whole grains do Okinawans eat?

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26072 · June 20, 2013 at 1:45 PM

the blue zone myth is a silly argument to start with. the best longevity is correlated much stronger to availability of health care than it is dietary components. Still, +1 for the second paragraph, something I think most on paleo mistake.

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19120 · June 20, 2013 at 12:09 PM

Why would I cherry-pick anything from the article?

Overall, I found it really well written. It did not immediately drop into the preconceived (somewhat racist / ethnist) notion that "all Japanese eat a lot of rice", which I appreciated. It fully described sweet potato consumption, and the only grain mentioned in the actual was rice, and it was mentioned by the author for their own dining experience, not by an expert nor an interviewed person; this is funny, since the words "plenty of whole grains" was stated by the author, in regards to their healthy diet.

So, seriously: seaweed, sweet potatoes, squid and octopus, lots of other fish, fermented soy / tofu, and some rice. That sounds like one of the best traditional diets I've seen.

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41341 · June 20, 2013 at 12:26 PM

Nothing to leave really from that article. But what's really the dietary take home message from blue zones and long-lived peoples? A diet mostly of plants, with small amounts of animal product. That sounds to be essentially what we all propose to eat, aside from the low-carbers and tiny carnivore faction.

Paleo probably should take note of how little animal product is really necessary for good health and longevity. It's not measured in pounds per day, it's mere ounces. The base of our food pyramid need not be meat, but rather plants.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46
41341 · June 20, 2013 at 2:37 PM

Even if the 'blue zone' thing is a myth, there are lessons to be learned from those cultures. And as for the correlation between health care and longevity, sort of a no-brainer. At least on the low-end of health care availability that's true, but the correlation gets more tenuous as health care becomes more and more available.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7
26072 · June 20, 2013 at 1:45 PM

the blue zone myth is a silly argument to start with. the best longevity is correlated much stronger to availability of health care than it is dietary components. Still, +1 for the second paragraph, something I think most on paleo mistake.

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78407 · June 20, 2013 at 2:31 PM

[EDIT: hater / troll]

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