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What about grapeseed oil?

by 1208 · May 14, 2010 at 12:57 PM

I just recieved a very thoughtful gift from my in-laws, a cookbook called The Gluten-free Almond Flour Cookbook by Elana Amsterdam. She endorses using agave syrup and grapeseed oil. I know that agave syrup is a highly refined, high fructose product, bu what about grapeseed oil? Would I be better off using butter or coconut oil? FWIW, I will be using recipes in the book for special occasions, and I'm not looking to add a new staple.

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18889 · May 14, 2010 at 10:25 AM

100 grams of grapeseed oil consists of roughly:

73% polyunsaturated fat - pretty much all omega 6 fat.

16% monounsaturated fat.

11% saturated fat.

There not much oil in grape seeds so it has to be chemicaly extracted to yeild decent amounts. It's quite similar to sunflower oil in composition.

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2088 · May 14, 2010 at 12:57 PM

I'm glad to hear you are only using it for, um, candy cigarettes, but...

As far as I can tell, Elena has not seen a recipe that doesn't need agave nectar. You want to remember that it's mostly fructose when you're choosing your sweeteners. If you're concerned about fructose, agave nectar is worse than table sugar or honey. How it has earned a healthy halo is beyond me. It's a highly processed product, just like corn syrup.

Gluten-free is what led me to paleo because gluten-free baked goods are generally very calorically dense and provide little in the way of nutrients. Almond flour, while being mostly monounsaturated fat, does contain significant polyunsaturated fats.

But, what really keeps me stuck on paleo/primal is that if I eat the most nutritive foods possible, I do not overeat. Not being hungry all the time changed my life -- seriously!

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