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How many eggs a day should I eat?

by (45) Updated December 18, 2012 at 1:28 AM Created October 15, 2011 at 8:26 PM

I usually eat meat only once a day, which makes my other 2 meals to include eggs (whole, boiled). I've just finished reading "The Paelo Diet for Athletes" (which is very good BTW) and they say there that you should limit your eggs intake to 6 a week. I normally eat 5-6 eggs a day. Is that too much ?

Thanks.

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19355 · October 15, 2011 at 9:06 PM

I don't think that there is a particular number of eggs that you "should" eat.

If you tolerate them, enjoy them, and notice no ill effects, eat as many as you want.

If you are concerned about possible negative health effects (too much omega 6, too much cholesterol, too much fat, egg protein allergies, etc.) avoid them. There are plenty of foods that provide a similar nutritional profile (grass fed dairy, meat, organs, etc.) if you're worried about eggs.

This morning I ate 6 whole eggs along with a bunch of sauteed cabbage, carrots, and garlic (all cooked in Kerrygold butter), so I definitely enjoy eggs. I think that they are a cheap, nutritious food...for me!

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8187 · October 16, 2011 at 3:35 AM

The issue with eggs, for both Loren Cordain and Robb Wolf, has more to do with frequency than with quantity.

On page 205 of "The Paleo Solution" Robb speaks to his concerns about eggs and autoimmunity, saying he digs this food but "doesn't recommend eating eggs for breakfast every day for the rest of your life." He says this clearly in the context of how well tolerated eggs are for particular persons.

Google Cordain on eggs and you'll find him making similar points. Like, here:

"In all three of my books, I have advocated egg consumption, particularly eggs that are produced with high omega 3 fatty acid contents. Chicken eggs are generally a nutritious food and are a good source of selenium, vitamin A, vitamin D and the B vitamins, some minerals and lutein as Barbara indicated."

Cordain goes on to say:

"So, should everybody include eggs in their diet on a daily basis? Not necessarily, particularly if we examine the evolutionary template. Without question our pre-agricultural ancestors would have collected and consumed eggs from birds’ nests whenever possible. However, in the wild, bird eggs only appear seasonally. Hence, pre-agricultural humans could have never consumed two eggs for breakfast every morning of the year similar to some westernized people, but rather only occasionally for a few brief weeks or months."

http://thepaleodiet.blogspot.com/2010/01/paleo-diet-q-29-january-2010-update-on.html

I happen to love eggs and am delighted to have taken off the list of "Oh! Fat! Bad!" foods I compiled years ago, when I lost briefly my mind and bought into the craziness of the Fat Phobics.

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1633 · October 16, 2011 at 10:20 PM

That book is outdated. Don't follow everything it says. Cordain does not say to limit eggs anymore. I mean, don't eat 6 a day for the rest of your life but if you want to eat even 10 a day for a while and you feel AWESOME doing this then do it. Just don't do it for the next 50 years.

Eggs are one of the 10 perfect foods if you don't have a severe autoimmune condition.

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791 · October 16, 2011 at 11:28 PM

Eggs are high in methionine. This is not usually a problem, unless you are one of the significant fraction of people that have mutations in one or more of the three genes necessary to convert homocysteine to cysteine. As methionine is a precursor to homo-cysteine, if you do have a genetic issue then egg consumption can lead to elevated homocysteine and methionine levels, which some think increases arteriosclerosis risk.

So, if eating eggs on a regular bases it is worthwhile to have your homo-cysteine level checked periodically. And, if elevated have you genes associated with homo-cysteine methylation evaluated (Quest Diagnostics does this as do many other lab, ask for a MTHFR gene test).

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3681 · October 15, 2011 at 8:59 PM

I eat about 4-8 per day.

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109 · December 18, 2012 at 1:28 AM

The Perfect Health Diet suggests eating 6 egg yolks a day.

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393 · December 17, 2012 at 10:00 PM

I am perhaps a bit extreme with regard to eggs, but I eat 12-15 a day fried in beef tallow. I feel great doing it, and my lipids are excellent.

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353 · May 21, 2012 at 2:55 AM

I have been eating 30+ /week and have reduced it to around 20 due to increased blood lipids although my butter and coconut oil consumption was a bigger contributor to that. The argumentation is that hunter-gatherer did not have access to such large quantities of eggs.

This thread gives you overview of how many eggs others are eating.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread52386.html

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4176 · May 20, 2012 at 9:18 PM

I just eat the yolks now

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18 · May 20, 2012 at 6:18 PM

I love making avocado deviled eggs for a snack or meal. Boil 3-4 eggs, scoop out 1/4-1/2 avocado in a bowl, mash with scooped out yolks, add pepper, lemon, mustard, hot sauc, sprinkle salt (whatever), then scoop back into the egg white shells!

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0 · December 17, 2012 at 8:49 PM

Kull il bajd ha trabbi il-bajd

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0 · December 17, 2012 at 8:47 PM

Eggs are very good for your health!

They contain alot of carbohydrate and fibre.

The best eggs are the oval ones .

Always try to eat the most healthy ones that are the white ones that come from north Europe and try to avoid the brown ones because they come from poor countries of africa like nigeria.

You know what they say :An egg a day keep the doctor away

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5744 · July 04, 2012 at 12:51 AM

Eggs are an amazing food. Find the right sources of them. Eat the whole thing. Don't stop unless they give you issues.

I have some Amish folk a few miles away who get me 12-24 a week. They don't last but a few days.

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0 · July 03, 2012 at 10:40 PM

Been consistently eating 7 whole eggs and 8 egg whites (minimum), every single day, for the last 2.5 years and my cholesterol levels were WELL within normal, when I tested it last month.

I also have a low-fat diet and I have been working out for all that time (hence the eggs).

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39204 · October 17, 2011 at 2:02 AM

I usually try to eat 4 pastured egg yolks a day. I hardboil the eggs and pitch the whites. I sometimes get stomach aches from eating whole eggs, but never from eating the yolks. I doubt there is much risk of autoimmunity from eating as many yolks as you want, and they have most of the nutrition anyway.

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1881 · October 16, 2011 at 2:27 PM

I eat 3 to 4 a day for breakfast -- soft boiled and then topped with coconut oil, paprika and Celtic seasalt.

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2851 · October 16, 2011 at 2:27 AM

Funny I should come across this question right now... for the first time in my life I'm craving eggs and bacon (far different than the refined carb +_sugars combos I used to want)... I already had a 4 egg/3 slices of bacon breakfast doused in butter and I'm feeling kinda leery about having it again for dinner! But the dish is soooooo satisfying!

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3279 · October 16, 2011 at 12:01 AM

I don't think that's too much. I eat 4-6 a day; they're a fantastic nutrition source.

The idea of 1 per day comes from the old idea that dietary cholesterol will jack your body's cholesterol -- for most people this is simply not true. I think people who advise eating only one per day are being overly cautious.

ETA: Try to get them pastured, if budget allows, to improve their nutritional awesomeness. From an article in Mother Earth News, Oct 2007:

• 1/4 less saturated fat (not ideal, but the other bennies make up for it IMO) • 2/3 more vitamin A • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids • 3 times more vitamin E • 7 times more beta carotene

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