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what does medical community think of Paleo diet?

by (150)
Updated about 19 hours ago
Created February 28, 2013 at 12:05 PM

What is the level of awareness among medical professionals in regards to Paleo diet?

There are a few researches in regards to success of Paleo diet for various conditions but are docs in general aware of it or do they see it as some funny fad diet?

What has been your experience when you visit your doc with some problem and you must tell that you are Paleo?

Might seem a stupid question but none in my vicinity has even heard of it before... :(

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18412 · March 01, 2013 at 3:14 PM

CD - of course it's not a good thing, but it's a great point.

Medium avatar
39841 · March 01, 2013 at 3:15 AM

I agree; I'm certain it is a great way to tell if your doctor is terrible.

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26172 · March 01, 2013 at 2:26 AM

I'm not sure this is a good thing. I certainly think that proper diet is one of the best forms of preventative medicine. I'd rather have a doctor who was willing to identify the cause (which may be diet) than just treat the symptoms.

Medium avatar
39841 · February 28, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Glad to hear it. I'll let you know if I stumble onto something that is HDL-specific. Personally, I just do a quick full-body workout once a week to fend off sarcopenia. I think everything is just diminishing returns after that. Congrats on the baby. Dunno much about the things. They're like hairless puppies, right? I'm doing OK up here in Portland. I really need to get back down to SD where I think you are. What a gorgeous place. Never trade paradise for hipsters, trust me.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5
18412 · February 28, 2013 at 10:08 PM

hey trav. i think so. Last I tested (a few months ago) I was still at 42 HDL (seems like that is where I live no matter what) but my TC was 201, and LDL was and trigs were lower than before. I can't remember the exact figures right now but they were better. but I sold my whole powertec system and haven't gotten a gym membership yet. haven't had a consistent work out program for months. lame i know. got a 1 yr old boy now. he's barrels of fun. very happy baby. that's my status. thanks for askin man. how you doin these days?

Medium avatar
10176 · February 28, 2013 at 9:54 PM

It's a degree of refinement thing, like saying you avoid Chardonnay in new oak.

Medium avatar
39841 · February 28, 2013 at 9:29 PM

Hey, Jack! Long time no see. You ever get your various parameters sorted?

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18412 · February 28, 2013 at 9:26 PM

phenomenal that you would even say that

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11254 · February 28, 2013 at 6:45 PM

I don' t know of a computer model penetrating into the voodoo that is nutrition research. They usually just stick to food journals and poor statistical models for that. But the big cow in the room is climatology. I was surprised to find out computer modelling figures largely in DNA research too. Someone did a thesis project a while back and found there was a 30% error rate, which is enough to make things very questionable. My coworker verified this to me- she'd worked with a guy obstreperous enough to say no to computer models of DNA. He lost funding.

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726 · February 28, 2013 at 5:54 PM

Can you offer examples where computer modeling has led to the sad state of affairs in nutrition research? For many areas of scientific research, your knock on computer modeling would be way off base, but different fields have different method and cultures. To which areas of research do you refer?

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11581 · February 28, 2013 at 1:35 PM

My former doctor was interested, but he was a rare breed who spent time and effort well beyond the norm. Too bad I live 550 miles away now. :-(

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247 · February 28, 2013 at 12:54 PM

actually, they're never interested. that's what upsets me. so i'm having DIGESTING issues, but it doesn't matter what i EAT to them?

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8 Answers

Medium avatar
6
39841 · February 28, 2013 at 9:16 PM

I have never in my life had a doctor ask me about what I eat and when I've brought it up they've changed the subject.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5
18412 · March 01, 2013 at 3:14 PM

CD - of course it's not a good thing, but it's a great point.

Medium avatar
39841 · March 01, 2013 at 3:15 AM

I agree; I'm certain it is a great way to tell if your doctor is terrible.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7
26172 · March 01, 2013 at 2:26 AM

I'm not sure this is a good thing. I certainly think that proper diet is one of the best forms of preventative medicine. I'd rather have a doctor who was willing to identify the cause (which may be diet) than just treat the symptoms.

Medium avatar
39841 · February 28, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Glad to hear it. I'll let you know if I stumble onto something that is HDL-specific. Personally, I just do a quick full-body workout once a week to fend off sarcopenia. I think everything is just diminishing returns after that. Congrats on the baby. Dunno much about the things. They're like hairless puppies, right? I'm doing OK up here in Portland. I really need to get back down to SD where I think you are. What a gorgeous place. Never trade paradise for hipsters, trust me.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5
18412 · February 28, 2013 at 10:08 PM

hey trav. i think so. Last I tested (a few months ago) I was still at 42 HDL (seems like that is where I live no matter what) but my TC was 201, and LDL was and trigs were lower than before. I can't remember the exact figures right now but they were better. but I sold my whole powertec system and haven't gotten a gym membership yet. haven't had a consistent work out program for months. lame i know. got a 1 yr old boy now. he's barrels of fun. very happy baby. that's my status. thanks for askin man. how you doin these days?

Medium avatar
39841 · February 28, 2013 at 9:29 PM

Hey, Jack! Long time no see. You ever get your various parameters sorted?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5
18412 · February 28, 2013 at 9:26 PM

phenomenal that you would even say that

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6
822 · February 28, 2013 at 12:54 PM

Actually, my internal medicine doc was the one who mentioned it to me (although I had been peripherally aware of it) after a physical and I had pre-hypertension, maybe fatty liver, maybe metabolic syndrome.

He didn't particularly say "paleo" or "primal" but more about eschewing processed foods, particularly wheat-based ones, sugars, etc.

He's a pretty good guy. Seems to be very up to date on his knowledge and reading of various things out there (as opposed to some where they've pretty much learned everything they needed back in '82).

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3180 · February 28, 2013 at 9:08 PM

I have found if you say "Paleo" they look at you funny and get all weirded-out. If you say "Low Carb Mediterranean" they treat you like the smartest person alive.

Medium avatar
10176 · February 28, 2013 at 9:54 PM

It's a degree of refinement thing, like saying you avoid Chardonnay in new oak.

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26172 · February 28, 2013 at 1:30 PM

My Dr. did not know, but when I explained it to him he said (in a snarky tone), "Hmm, fresh vegetables and organic meat, sounds novel." He was a bit worried about dropping the whole grains, but not overly concerned.

All he asked was that I take a before and 6 month after cholesterol test as well various other tests. Those results convinced him to drop the junk.

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11581 · February 28, 2013 at 12:10 PM

While most doctors are completely unfamiliar with paleo (just like most of them don't know much at all about nutrition) there is this:

http://paleophysiciansnetwork.com/

I don't tell my doctor that I'm paleo. I tell him that I eat real food, avoiding all the junk, sugars and flours. Generally, he isn't even that interested.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f
11581 · February 28, 2013 at 1:35 PM

My former doctor was interested, but he was a rare breed who spent time and effort well beyond the norm. Too bad I live 550 miles away now. :-(

006f2e9b763058ff2332681c206563e4
247 · February 28, 2013 at 12:54 PM

actually, they're never interested. that's what upsets me. so i'm having DIGESTING issues, but it doesn't matter what i EAT to them?

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5650 · February 28, 2013 at 9:14 PM

i've noticed some of the doctors i have follow it. i was in the hospital a few weeks ago and the one internal medicine doctor follows it. we talked for a while about our favorite meats.

also, my gastro. doctor follows it for his crohn's. he still needs humira but says the diet is good for health in general. i have to agree. i don't think the diet can put me into remission, but it's a good diet to be on.

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584 · February 28, 2013 at 5:43 PM

He doesn't seem to know what I'm talking about, but I bet in six months he'll be all about it.

He has the wheat belly book and another book that talks about fruit being okay as long as it's in its natural state with the fiber and to limit it. He leaves them in every room and makes people wait a long time so... So he totally understands about the improvements I had after stopping wheat and why I'm leery of the effects some other carbs were having on me. He's close. He's just got to figure out the lectin connection and he'll come around.

But he's not a mainstream doctor.

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11254 · February 28, 2013 at 5:36 PM

Most don't know. I know a few doctors and it seems there is this tendency to point out there are no studies for various things I talk about. Generally, they are right, though I need to remember to point out some of the acne research is trending in the right direction recently. I also need to point out most studies aren't repeated, nor repeatable for that matter.

Indeed, given the sad state of affairs in research, especially since the introduction of computer modelling- which often doesn't reflect reality at all- entire fields of research need a reboot.

However, if someone has a health problem, it seems like they'll listen at least to some things, because, when it comes to their own health, they suddenly realized how many side effects come with standard medical interventions.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6
11254 · February 28, 2013 at 6:45 PM

I don' t know of a computer model penetrating into the voodoo that is nutrition research. They usually just stick to food journals and poor statistical models for that. But the big cow in the room is climatology. I was surprised to find out computer modelling figures largely in DNA research too. Someone did a thesis project a while back and found there was a 30% error rate, which is enough to make things very questionable. My coworker verified this to me- she'd worked with a guy obstreperous enough to say no to computer models of DNA. He lost funding.

6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d
726 · February 28, 2013 at 5:54 PM

Can you offer examples where computer modeling has led to the sad state of affairs in nutrition research? For many areas of scientific research, your knock on computer modeling would be way off base, but different fields have different method and cultures. To which areas of research do you refer?

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