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Is Eating raw sweet potato bad for you?

by 45 · July 29, 2014 at 11:45 AM

I regularly eat raw sweet potato on the car ride home after karate. I view it the same as eating raw carrot. Are there any potential issues with eating raw sweet potato?

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6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
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24412 · October 15, 2012 at 08:59 AM

Found this little gem with a bit of googling (scroll down a ways until you get to sweet potatoes) http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0207E/T0207E08.htm

"There is a significant correlation between the trypsin inhibitor content and the protein content of the sweet potato variety. Heating to 90°C for several minutes inactivates trypsin inhibitors. Lawrence and Walker (1976) have implicated TIA in sweet potato as a contributory factor in the disease enteritis necroticans. This seems doubtful since sweet potato is not usually eaten raw and the activity of the trypsin inhibitor present is destroyed by heat."

There is also a blurb about the fartiness of raffinose in sweet potatoes, but I'd be more concerned about enteritis necroticans, a potentially fatal form of food poisoning that causes gangrene of the gut.

Long story short, cook those puppies before eating them!

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79
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5071 · October 15, 2012 at 08:48 AM

This seems like a really good way to give yourself serious potentially long-lasting GI issues.

No, eating a raw carrot is not the same as eating a raw sweet potato. Carrots have very little starch. A potato is essentially a starch bomb.

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0 · July 29, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Its like sweet corn, pretty tasty but it has a lot of calories, so it will definitely increase your weight.

65c13b50f95327b630034042a96ff9f5
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0 · April 06, 2014 at 10:01 PM

I don't see how a monosaccharide (fructose) can fluctuate on the glycemic scale by cooking the sweet potato. does the heat alter the sugar compound? doesn't cooking it just aid in digestion by weakening the cellulose in the cell wall? enlighten me please.

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0 · August 16, 2013 at 07:36 PM

juice them, allow the starch to settle on the bottom on top of the starch you will have a delicious orange juice that is full of nutrients that your body will not have to work to absorb. Cooking sweet potatoes like most veggies reduces nutrients.

764418ae2b761eb1aed5cec8a137ae6f
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0 · June 20, 2013 at 03:25 AM

My triglycerides rose because I was eating lots of baked sweet potatoes, which rank very high on the glycemic index.

If you boil sweat potatoes till they get gelatinous, they are low on the glycemmic index. When they are gelatinous the carbs are absorbed more slowly. Sort of like the difference between brown rice and rice cakes.

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390 · June 06, 2013 at 04:06 PM

I wonder how this questions plays into our evolution / past ancestors. I am sure if they came across these things in the ground, they would eat them raw like most other things they found foraging.

Thoughts?

9053b882bcfa39aa5a1b8d31abd95d7c
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0 · June 06, 2013 at 03:12 AM

I eat raw yams all the time. Love them and have no problems with my GI.

1f71c5876cc990c754051d1f54486532
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0 · March 30, 2013 at 06:42 PM

With regard to the question of mature edible Yam's being toxic...

As the previous contributor posted the following link..

http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0207E/T0207E08.htm

I'm wondering if the last paragraph of that link clears up the question regarding Yam?

"Yam..

"The edible, mature, cultivated yam does not contain any toxic principles..."

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