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Bean alternative?

by (267)
Updated 31 minutes ago
Created August 07, 2010 at 7:25 AM

Winter is coming soon, and with it the need to feel cozy after being out in the harsh weather. In my youth that would consist of a hot shower followed by a hot chocolate and a hot bowl of chunky soup. Now, most chunky winter soups usually contain beans and/or buckwheat to help "fill them out". Since neither are strictly paleo, I'm wondering whether there are any alternatives for beans/buckwheat? Are there any paleo/old-world seeds which can be used to add "body" to soups?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:50 AM

Check this out, about ancient stone tools for milling grains. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101018/full/news.2010.549.html

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:37 AM

Not that I think quinoa should take the place of beans in your soup, any residue of saponins can be even harder on your gut than wheat gluten and bran combined. Been there, done that. I've recently added properly soaked beans back into my diet on an experimental basis, and so far no problems to report.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:35 AM

There was more food processing going on back then than popular belief would lead us to think. Access to fire and the use of grinding stones goes waaaay back.

Bf72f771a19f3a3789f7fdf24c86daef
767 · June 06, 2011 at 10:37 PM

yup yup, root vegetables really help to make a more "filling" soup. just make sure you have room for the extra carbs in your day.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 4:26 PM

I reintroduced tubers after losing 105lbs, gained 20lbs of muscle an still have visible abs.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 4:25 PM

I've found using glucose sticks that now that I'm insulin sensitive and keto adapted, potatoes don't launch my insulin, post exercise. Glucose doesn't make sugar bad, fructose does. Potatoes give glucose which every cell can use, fructose, not so much.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a
4984 · December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

Are you not concerned that potatoes are so starchy you may as well be eating a bowl of sugar? White potatoes are really insulin spiking.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a
4984 · December 31, 2010 at 1:43 PM

According to Robb Wolf Quinoa is still problematic due to high lectin content.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:33 PM

This is also a great meal to sneak some ground liver into.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:33 PM

If lacto friendly, grassfed cheddar on top!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:22 PM

Plus saponins. Bleh

8eec45c654ab8ea2ba730f291ff20b3e
40 · August 11, 2010 at 2:49 PM

Could also be that the beans are one of the most highly estrogenic foods on the planet behind Soy and flax. That terribleness you feel may be the surge of estrogen infecting you body... just a thought.

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423
821 · August 10, 2010 at 9:51 AM

Agreed. But it still seems like a better bet than grains. We are, after all, looking for alternatives, not perfection. You can just sprinkle a little bit in your stew. Yum! It don't hurt nobody.

F8c63410ad2ade1978775862befb95ff
267 · August 09, 2010 at 6:35 AM

I looked at quinoa, but disregarded it. My understanding of paleo is that our early ancestors wouldn't've eaten anything that couldn't be eaten raw. Quinoa requires processing to remove the inedible husk, so even though it is strictly a seed I don't think early homosapien would've taken to eating it. I understand it also has a high glycemic index/load which would cause the same problems as grains.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15976 · August 07, 2010 at 1:56 PM

Just wanted to chime in that while i generally consider grains to be the biggest offender for the general american, i too actually feel worse after beans than grains. I think that may be because of the preparation in many grain dishes - ie that there may at least SOME degree of fermentation/souring/culturing/long baking, etc. In i would say 99% of bean dishes (especially in restaurants) beans are quickly cooked and really tough on the digestion.

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11 Answers

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581
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1376 · December 31, 2010 at 5:50 AM

Carmelize onions in a lot of butter or coconut oil before you add to soups. They actually thicken the soup a lot. Some types of capsicum peppers also thicken up with long slow cooking.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3
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20787 · August 08, 2010 at 3:15 AM

Potato is IMO, better than beans and can be added in a complimentary fashion to most soups. Same goes for white rice. If you have no weight or blood sugar issues, a tad of potato once in a while to compliment the meat is probably not a big deal. What I do with carbs is just keep them down to a reasonable level and target ones that are healthier and higher on my favorites list. That means, I choose something I really like and that is more healthy, or I just don't eat em at all. I personally do not eat much rice anymore because I never did super like it in the first place so why eat it! But I am more likely to eat potato once in a while because I really like potato with butter. I also like bread with butter but since potato with butter tastes just as good, I will usually choose the potato instead as it is probably healthier. But I also really like steak and since that is probably also healthier yet, I eat a lot of steak, but potato only once in a while. This way, I eat healthy but am flexible and don't feel deprived.
-Eva

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1
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7324 · December 31, 2010 at 1:59 PM

I like filling up my stew with plenty of veggies. Onion is great, as are shallots, turnips, rutabegas, celery, celery root, carrots, potatoes. These are very filling, especially with meat.

Bf72f771a19f3a3789f7fdf24c86daef
767 · June 06, 2011 at 10:37 PM

yup yup, root vegetables really help to make a more "filling" soup. just make sure you have room for the extra carbs in your day.

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66
3
2004 · August 07, 2010 at 9:09 AM

For cold winter days we like a thick soup with fatty meat, Geese schmalz, onions, kale

Turnips, parsley root, carrots, celery, parsnips can be added for variation...

Spices (not strictly Paleo, but delicious): salt, nutmeg, black pepper, allspice, garlic

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a
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4703 · April 25, 2013 at 1:09 AM

If beans don't bother your digestion and you prepare them properly I don't see a reason to avoid them.

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a
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5516 · August 07, 2010 at 12:53 PM

I made a really amazing chili with lots of butter, ground beef, and many different types of chopped up bell peppers for the chunkiness (of course multiple other spices and everything.)

I feel even worse after eating beans than I do after eating bread so filling it out with veggies seems like a good idea.

8eec45c654ab8ea2ba730f291ff20b3e
40 · August 11, 2010 at 2:49 PM

Could also be that the beans are one of the most highly estrogenic foods on the planet behind Soy and flax. That terribleness you feel may be the surge of estrogen infecting you body... just a thought.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc
15976 · August 07, 2010 at 1:56 PM

Just wanted to chime in that while i generally consider grains to be the biggest offender for the general american, i too actually feel worse after beans than grains. I think that may be because of the preparation in many grain dishes - ie that there may at least SOME degree of fermentation/souring/culturing/long baking, etc. In i would say 99% of bean dishes (especially in restaurants) beans are quickly cooked and really tough on the digestion.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:32 PM

Potato Chili.

Several large Potatoes, peeled and diced into small chunks.

Lightly Brown 2 lbs grassfed ground beef

Saut?? a Bell Pepper(red or orange best), a large Onion, couple Jalape??o To preference

Dice several tomatoes

A clove of garlic minced.

A healthy amount of Chili powder(make sure it's GF) to taste(some like more). A little black pepper

A dash of cinnamon( too much will overpower it)

Throw it all in the slowcooker on low all day.

Go find something fun to do, fast, and an hour before you plan on eating, find very heavy things to play with. Very heavy is a relative subjective weight. Train fasted.

Then get a very large bowl and feast on your tasty tasty simple creation

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:33 PM

If lacto friendly, grassfed cheddar on top!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 4:25 PM

I've found using glucose sticks that now that I'm insulin sensitive and keto adapted, potatoes don't launch my insulin, post exercise. Glucose doesn't make sugar bad, fructose does. Potatoes give glucose which every cell can use, fructose, not so much.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a
4984 · December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

Are you not concerned that potatoes are so starchy you may as well be eating a bowl of sugar? White potatoes are really insulin spiking.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:33 PM

This is also a great meal to sneak some ground liver into.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 4:26 PM

I reintroduced tubers after losing 105lbs, gained 20lbs of muscle an still have visible abs.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581
1
4896 · August 08, 2010 at 12:58 AM

I am lucky that beans never been "big" in my home, so didn't grow to depend on them. For me not using too much potatoes in soups might more of a problem.

When I want a hearty soup I add much more meat than I would normally, varying types (not just regular muscle meat, but for example gizzards), and I love kale for the filler. In addition to that just regular veggies, whatever's around.

adding sour cream just before you eat is also great.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f
0
1197 · April 25, 2013 at 1:45 AM

If you sautee zucchini and onions until caramilized, you can puree them and add them to you soup or stew for a silky, smooth body. It isn't as heavy as potato puree, and doesn't dampen the flavors of the soup. Try it! It works!

Bece7bea7c9aaedd8bd3b1181a865f27
0
0 · April 25, 2013 at 12:04 AM

I use celery root to replace my beans. I cut them into long strips then into the approx size of a bean. It definitely helps fill out a soup.

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423
0
821 · August 07, 2010 at 8:32 PM

If you're looking for a "grain", try quinoa. It's great added to a meat and vegetable stew in a slow-cooker!

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423
821 · August 10, 2010 at 9:51 AM

Agreed. But it still seems like a better bet than grains. We are, after all, looking for alternatives, not perfection. You can just sprinkle a little bit in your stew. Yum! It don't hurt nobody.

F8c63410ad2ade1978775862befb95ff
267 · August 09, 2010 at 6:35 AM

I looked at quinoa, but disregarded it. My understanding of paleo is that our early ancestors wouldn't've eaten anything that couldn't be eaten raw. Quinoa requires processing to remove the inedible husk, so even though it is strictly a seed I don't think early homosapien would've taken to eating it. I understand it also has a high glycemic index/load which would cause the same problems as grains.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a
4984 · December 31, 2010 at 1:43 PM

According to Robb Wolf Quinoa is still problematic due to high lectin content.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1
22913 · December 31, 2010 at 1:22 PM

Plus saponins. Bleh

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:37 AM

Not that I think quinoa should take the place of beans in your soup, any residue of saponins can be even harder on your gut than wheat gluten and bran combined. Been there, done that. I've recently added properly soaked beans back into my diet on an experimental basis, and so far no problems to report.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:50 AM

Check this out, about ancient stone tools for milling grains. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101018/full/news.2010.549.html

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b
24538 · April 25, 2013 at 2:35 AM

There was more food processing going on back then than popular belief would lead us to think. Access to fire and the use of grinding stones goes waaaay back.

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