Aa09b54a9f5334c420b1ff7d86b724da
0

brashing your teeth and plaque removal by the dentist. Paleo?

by (0)
Updated October 20, 2014 at 4:09 AM
Created May 03, 2014 at 2:23 PM

not sure if the subject is paleo related. i mean, in paleo times people didnt go to the dentist every 6 monthes to remove their teeth's plaque...im not sure they even brushed their teeth at all. plaque is also a natural compound. so should you go to the dentist as often to remove it or is it actually protects your teeth?

thanks.

just for the record i brush daily :)

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:41 PM

I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets and I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you

Here's the link to the reply [disposablewebpage.com]

I had to bury the text in this webpage because I couldn't get the email formatting to show up in a readable fashion with the commenting system on paleohack, sorry

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:38 PM

This isn't an answer but I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets. And I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you. Here's the link to the reply [disposablewebpage.com] I had to bury the text in this webpage because I couldn't get the email layout to show up in a readable fashion with the commenting system on paleohack, sorry

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:38 PM

This isn't an answer but I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets. And I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you.

Here's the link to the reply [disposablewebpage.com] I had to bury the text in this webpage because I couldn't get the email layout to show up in a readable fashion with the commenting system on paleohack, sorry

Medium avatar
598 · May 04, 2014 at 4:14 PM

And not a bad thought at that. I've wondered the same thing about sticking ear swabs in our ears every day. Now I very rarely do that and my ears aren't clogged or anything. They actually feel much more healthy.

Aa09b54a9f5334c420b1ff7d86b724da
0 · May 03, 2014 at 3:22 PM

lol. it was just a thought.

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5 Answers

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:32 PM

This isn't an answer but I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets. And I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you.
Here's the reply>
---------------------------------------------
Definitions
Tooth decay (caries) - Tooth decay which is also called dental cavities or dental caries is the destruction of the outer surface of (enamel) of a tooth medical-dictionary

Streptococcus mutans (S. Mutans) - bacteria commonly found in the human oral cavity wikiand is one of the primary bacteria that cause carries ajcn.nutrition.org medical-dictionaryFermentable carbohydrates - carbohydrates which are not digested well and need to be fermented in the stomach. Notable fermentable carbohydrates: wheat (glucose), rye (glucose), apples (fructose), honey (sucrose), fuits, milk (lactose), chocolate, barley (glucose), cereal (glucose) hamiltonhealthsciences.calivestrong.com

How Tooth Decay Happens (as I'm understanding it)

Tooth decay requires the simultaneous presence of three factors: plaque bacteria, sugar, and a vulnerable tooth surfacemedical-dictionary

1 Plaque bacteria (S. Mutans) attaches itself to our teeth, it uses sucrose to do this wiki

2 the bacteria metabolizes sugars such as: glucose, sucrose, and lactose into lactic acid. 3 the acid acid builds up on teeth. 4 the acid dissolves the minerals in the enamel creating a cavity. 5 the acid continually dissolves the tooth until it reaches the pulp of the tooth and causes a toothache medical-dictionary phenomena.nationalgeographic.com wiki

Bacteria on teeth ---> bacteria eats sugar ---> bacteria poops acid ---> acid eats tooth ---> caries

Causes of Caries - As far as I can tell there is no other cause to caries other than bacteria and sugar [a whole bunch-a searchin and didn't find any other significant causes]
- Tooth decay is a common health problem, second in prevalence only to the common cold medical-dictionarySo since the cause of decay is clear and the problem of decay is vast we can look to the overall general diet of the population. What are the foods that carry the most abundant sources of glucose, sucrose, and lactose that we commonly consume (not including obvious ones like coke)? Wheat, rice, potatoes, fruit, flour, cereal, corn, yep a lot of of starchy (or glucosy) carbohydrates (of course at this point it's not so much about grains but about sugar and carbohydrates). And it's exactly these foods that where introduced to the human diet during agricultural development in the neolithic age [various wikipedia articles]. It's also apparent that these foods, aside from fruit, are not essential, this is obvious because humans lived for thousands of years without these foods
Cause Effect Relation Evidence
- This study compared fermentable carbs with non fermentable carbs and this is their conlcusion:

"The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of foods/beverages containing “fermentable” carbohydrates at an exposure frequency of four or more times daily and an increased tooth demineralisation" efsa.europa.eu

- And this abstract says:

"Studies have confirmed the direct relation between intake of dietary sugars and dental caries across the life span"ajcn.nutrition.org

Correlation Evidence Based On Human History

- Modern diets that resemble a pre agricultural revolution varieties such as Inuit/Eskimo and the Yucatan Maya also don't show tooth decay. Interestingly when the some of the Inuit adopted a diet where the people showed tooth decay the Inuit also developed tooth decay, so it wasn't genetic which caused caries for the Inuit examiner.com

- Researchers from the University of Zurich examined Otzi, a European neolithic mummy wiki they found he suffered form an advanced state of periodontitis, a form of tooth decay affecting tissue around the tooth caused by an overly aggressive immune reaction to bacteria adhered to teeth (S. Mutans perhaps?) wikiHere's what The University had to say:

"The fact that the Iceman suffered from tooth decay is attributable to his eating more and more starchy foods such as bread and cereal porridge which were consumed more commonly in the Neolithic period because of the rise of agriculture" mediadesk.uzh.ch

- Here's what the UCL Institute of Archaeology department has to say about diet and tooth decay

"Tooth decay is directly related to carbohydrate consumption and the two largest changes in dental health worldwide have been the adoption of agriculture and the rise of sugar consumption in the greatly expanding cities of the 19th century. This is strongly reflected in human remains from archaeological sites." ucl.ac.uk

- When researches at Oxford conducted a study analyzing S. Mutans DNA across the global population and discovered S. Mutans began increasing in exponentially over ten thousand years ago (when the neolithic revolution began) they attributed the majority of the increases in S. Mutans to dietary changes during the agricultural revolution. Here's how they put it:

"Analysis of the core genome suggested that among 73 genes present in all isolates of S. Mutans but absent in other species of the Mutans taxonomic group, the majority can be associated with metabolic processes that could have contributed to the successful adaptation of S. Mutans to its new niche, the human mouth, and with the dietary changes that accompanied the origin of agriculture." mbe.oxfordjournals.org

Limitations

- Don't know about global implications. Is there any difference between say Asian skeletons and modern humans or African skeletons and modern humans? Not really sure? - Difficult to find new research studying cause/effect relationship between tooth decay and carbohydrates in modern humans - It's a complex subject and I'm just a computer science college student with limited time trying to connect some dots Conclusion So after all of this my previous suspicion hasn't really changed. In fact it's become more exclusive. Instead of grains being the a major tooth decay cause it's an increase size proportion of carbohydrates in general that's the problem. Which still leads to the question: "can grains, wheat, highly sugarized foods, etc. even be considered food?" Because again, how can anything be called food that's so harmful it rots the very things that allow us to eat. So pretty much my take away from this is to maintain a diet higher in fats than in carbohydrates and that all of the carbohydrates calories would come from vegetables, fruit, and the limited traces in any other food not dense in sugars and starches. This will then limit tooth decay (among a host of other health claims which I'm not focusing on). Look forward to your comments. Thanks Respectfully, Christopher Lupo

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:27 PM

This isn't an answer but I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets. And I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you.
Here's the reply>
--------------------------------------------- Definitions

Tooth decay (caries) - Tooth decay which is also called dental cavities or dental caries is the destruction of the outer surface of (enamel) of a tooth medical-dictionary

Streptococcus mutans (S. Mutans) - bacteria commonly found in the human oral cavity wiki and is one of the primary bacteria that cause carries ajcn.nutrition.org medical-dictionary

Fermentable carbohydrates - carbohydrates which are not digested well and need to be fermented in the stomach. Notable fermentable carbohydrates: wheat (glucose), rye (glucose), apples (fructose), honey (sucrose), fuits, milk (lactose), chocolate, barley (glucose), cereal (glucose) hamiltonhealthsciences.ca livestrong.com
How Tooth Decay Happens (as I'm understanding it)
Tooth decay requires the simultaneous presence of three factors: plaque bacteria, sugar, and a vulnerable tooth surface medical-dictionary

1 Plaque bacteria (S. Mutans) attaches itself to our teeth, it uses sucrose to do this wiki

2 the bacteria metabolizes sugars such as: glucose, sucrose, and lactose into lactic acid. 3 the acid acid builds up on teeth. 4 the acid dissolves the minerals in the enamel creating a cavity. 5 the acid continually dissolves the tooth until it reaches the pulp of the tooth and causes a toothache medical-dictionary phenomena.nationalgeographic.com wiki

Bacteria on teeth ---> bacteria eats sugar ---> bacteria poops acid ---> acid eats tooth ---> caries

Causes of Caries
- As far as I can tell there is no other cause to caries other than bacteria and sugar [a whole bunch-a searchin and didn't find any other significant causes]
- Tooth decay is a common health problem, second in prevalence only to the common cold medical-dictionary

So since the cause of decay is clear and the problem of decay is vast we can look to the overall general diet of the population. What are the foods that carry the most abundant sources of glucose, sucrose, and lactose that we commonly consume (not including obvious ones like coke)? Wheat, rice, potatoes, fruit, flour, cereal, corn, yep a lot of of starchy (or glucosy) carbohydrates (of course at this point it's not so much about grains but about sugar and carbohydrates). And it's exactly these foods that where introduced to the human diet during agricultural development in the neolithic age [various wikipedia articles]. It's also apparent that these foods, aside from fruit, are not essential, this is obvious because humans lived for thousands of years without these foods

Cause Effect Relation Evidence
- This study compared fermentable carbs with non fermentable carbs and this is their conlcusion:

"The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of foods/beverages containing “fermentable” carbohydrates at an exposure frequency of four or more times daily and an increased tooth demineralisation" efsa.europa.eu

- And this abstract says:

"Studies have confirmed the direct relation between intake of dietary sugars and dental caries across the life span" ajcn.nutrition.org

Correlation Evidence Based On Human History
- Modern diets that resemble a pre agricultural revolution varieties such as Inuit/Eskimo and the Yucatan Maya also don't show tooth decay. Interestingly when the some of the Inuit adopted a diet where the people showed tooth decay the Inuit also developed tooth decay, so it wasn't genetic which caused caries for the Inuit examiner.com

- Researchers from the University of Zurich examined Otzi, a European neolithic mummy wiki they found he suffered form an advanced state of periodontitis, a form of tooth decay affecting tissue around the tooth caused by an overly aggressive immune reaction to bacteria adhered to teeth (S. Mutans perhaps?) wiki Here's what The University had to say:

"The fact that the Iceman suffered from tooth decay is attributable to his eating more and more starchy foods such as bread and cereal porridge which were consumed more commonly in the Neolithic period because of the rise of agriculture" mediadesk.uzh.ch

- Here's what the UCL Institute of Archaeology department has to say about diet and tooth decay

"Tooth decay is directly related to carbohydrate consumption and the two largest changes in dental health worldwide have been the adoption of agriculture and the rise of sugar consumption in the greatly expanding cities of the 19th century. This is strongly reflected in human remains from archaeological sites." ucl.ac.uk

- When researches at Oxford conducted a study analyzing S. Mutans DNA across the global population and discovered S. Mutans began increasing in exponentially over ten thousand years ago (when the neolithic revolution began) they attributed the majority of the increases in S. Mutans to dietary changes during the agricultural revolution. Here's how they put it:

"Analysis of the core genome suggested that among 73 genes present in all isolates of S. Mutans but absent in other species of the Mutans taxonomic group, the majority can be associated with metabolic processes that could have contributed to the successful adaptation of S. Mutans to its new niche, the human mouth, and with the dietary changes that accompanied the origin of agriculture." mbe.oxfordjournals.org

Limitations
- Don't know about global implications. Is there any difference between say Asian skeletons and modern humans or African skeletons and modern humans? Not really sure?
- Difficult to find new research studying cause/effect relationship between tooth decay and carbohydrates in modern humans
- It's a complex subject and I'm just a computer science college student with limited time trying to connect some dots
Conclusion
So after all of this my previous suspicion hasn't really changed. In fact it's become more exclusive. Instead of grains being the a major tooth decay cause it's an increase size proportion of carbohydrates in general that's the problem. Which still leads to the question: "can grains, wheat, highly sugarized foods, etc. even be considered food?" Because again, how can anything be called food that's so harmful it rots the very things that allow us to eat. So pretty much my take away from this is to maintain a diet higher in fats than in carbohydrates and that all of the carbohydrates calories would come from vegetables, fruit, and the limited traces in any other food not dense in sugars and starches. This will then limit tooth decay (among a host of other health claims which I'm not focusing on). Look forward to your comments. Thanks

Respectfully, Christopher Lupo

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:12 PM

. Mutans perhaps?) [wiki]. Here's what The University had to say:"The fact that the Iceman suffered from tooth decay is attributable to his eating more and more starchy foods such as bread and cereal porridge which were consumed more commonly in the Neolithic period because of the rise of agriculture" [mediadesk.uzh.ch]- Here's what the UCL Institute of Archaeology department has to say about diet and tooth decay  
"Tooth decay is directly related to carbohydrate consumption and the two largest changes in dental health worldwide have been the adoption of agriculture and the rise of sugar consumption in the greatly expanding cities of the 19th century. This is strongly reflected in human remains from archaeological sites." [ucl.ac.uk]- When researches at Oxford conducted a study analyzing S. Mutans DNA across the global population and discovered S. Mutans began increasing in exponentially over ten thousand years ago (when the neolithic revolution began) they attributed the majority of the increases in S. Mutans to dietary changes during the agricultural revolution. Here's how they put it:
"Analysis of the core genome suggested that among 73 genes present in all isolates of S. Mutans but absent in other species of the Mutans taxonomic group, the majority can be associated with metabolic processes that could have contributed to the successful adaptation of S. Mutans to its new niche, the human mouth, and with the dietary changes that accompanied the origin of agriculture." [mbe.oxfordjournals.org]

19617831ba0fe6ce854ea640c38613c4
0
0 · May 04, 2014 at 4:09 PM

This isn't an answer but I was in an email conversation with Monica Reinagel [wikipedia.org] about cavities and tooth decay in relation to diets. And I kinda did a lot of research in one of my replies that may be of interest to you.

Here's a the reply>

Definitions

Tooth decay (caries) - Tooth decay which is also called dental cavities or dental caries is the destruction of the outer surface of (enamel) of a tooth [medical-dictionary] Streptococcus mutans (S. Mutans) - bacteria commonly found in the human oral cavity [wiki] and is one of the primary bacteria that cause carries[ajcn.nutrition.org] [medical-dictionary] the other primary cause is lactobacilli Fermentable carbohydrates - carbohydrates which are not digested well and need to be fermented in the stomach. Notable fermentable carbohydrates: wheat (glucose), rye (glucose), apples (fructose), honey (sucrose), fuits, milk (lactose), chocolate, barley (glucose), cereal (glucose)[hamiltonhealthsciences.ca] [livestrong.com] How Tooth Decay Happens (as I'm understanding it) Tooth decay requires the simultaneous presence of three factors: plaque bacteria, sugar, and a vulnerable tooth surface [medical-dictionary]
1 Plaque bacteria (S. Mutans) attaches itself to our teeth, it uses sucrose to do this [wiki]. 2 the bacteria metabolizes sugars such as: glucose, sucrose, and lactose into lactic acid. 3 the acid acid builds up on teeth. 4 the acid dissolves the minerals in the enamel creating a cavity. 5 the acid continually dissolves the tooth until it reaches the pulp of the tooth and causes a toothache[medical-dictionary] [phenomena.nationalgeographic.com] [wiki]
Bacteria on teeth ---> bacteria eats sugar ---> bacteria poops acid ---> acid eats tooth ---> caries
Causes of Caries
- As far as I can tell there is no other cause to caries other than bacteria and sugar [a whole bunch-a searchin and didn't find any other significant causes]
- Tooth decay is a common health problem, second in prevalence only to the common cold [medical-dictionary]
So since the cause of decay is clear and the problem of decay is vast we can look to the overall general diet of the population. What are the foods that carry the most abundant sources of glucose, sucrose, and lactose that we commonly consume (not including obvious ones like coke)? Wheat, rice, potatoes, fruit, flour, cereal, corn, yep a lot of of starchy (or glucosy) carbohydrates (of course at this point it's not so much about grains but about sugar and carbohydrates). And it's exactly these foods that where introduced to the human diet during agricultural development in the neolithic age [various wikipedia articles]. It's also apparent that these foods, aside from fruit, are not essential, this is obvious because humans lived for thousands of years without these foods
Cause Effect Relation Evidence
- This study compared fermentable carbs with non fermentable carbs and this is their conlcusion:
"The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of foods/beverages containing “fermentable” carbohydrates at an exposure frequency of four or more times daily and an increased tooth demineralisation" [efsa.europa.eu]
- And this abstract says:
"Studies have confirmed the direct relation between intake of dietary sugars and dental caries across the life span" [ajcn.nutrition.org]
Correlation Evidence Based On Human History
- Modern diets that resemble a pre agricultural revolution varieties such as Inuit/Eskimo and the Yucatan Maya also don't show tooth decay. Interestingly when the some of the Inuit adopted a diet where the people showed tooth decay the Inuit also developed tooth decay, so it wasn't genetic which caused caries for the Inuit [examiner.com]
- Researchers from the University of Zurich examined Otzi, a European neolithic mummy [wiki], they found he suffered form an advanced state of periodontitis, a form of tooth decay affecting tissue around the tooth caused by an overly aggressive immune reaction to bacteria adhered to teeth (S. Mutans perhaps?) [wiki]. Here's what The University had to say:
"The fact that the Iceman suffered from tooth decay is attributable to his eating more and more starchy foods such as bread and cereal porridge which were consumed more commonly in the Neolithic period because of the rise of agriculture" [mediadesk.uzh.ch]
- Here's what the UCL Institute of Archaeology department has to say about diet and tooth decay
"Tooth decay is directly related to carbohydrate consumption and the two largest changes in dental health worldwide have been the adoption of agriculture and the rise of sugar consumption in the greatly expanding cities of the 19th century. This is strongly reflected in human remains from archaeological sites." [ucl.ac.uk] (The rest of this text should be more left justified than it currently is. In other words, it's messed up, sorry, I couldn't fix it)
- When researches at Oxford conducted a study analyzing S. Mutans DNA across the global population and discovered S. Mutans began increasing in exponentially over ten thousand years ago (when the neolithic revolution began) they attributed the majority of the increases in S. Mutans to dietary changes during the agricultural revolution. Here's how they put it:
"Analysis of the core genome suggested that among 73 genes present in all isolates of S. Mutans but absent in other species of the Mutans taxonomic group, the majority can be associated with metabolic processes that could have contributed to the successful adaptation of S. Mutans to its new niche, the human mouth, and with the dietary changes that accompanied the origin of agriculture."[mbe.oxfordjournals.org]
Limitations
- Don't know about global implications. Is there any difference between say Asian skeletons and modern humans or African skeletons and modern humans? Not really sure?
- Difficult to find new research studying cause/effect relationship between tooth decay and carbohydrates in modern humans
- It's a complex subject and I'm just a computer science college student with limited time trying to connect some dots
Conclusion
So after all of this my previous suspicion hasn't really changed. In fact it's become more exclusive. Instead of grains being the a major tooth decay cause it's an increase size proportion of carbohydrates in general that's the problem. Which still leads to the question: "can grains, wheat, highly sugarized foods, etc. even be considered food?" Because again, how can anything be called food that's so harmful it rots the very things that allow us to eat. So pretty much my take away from this is to maintain a diet higher in fats than in carbohydrates and that all of the carbohydrates calories would come from vegetables, fruit, and the limited traces in any other food not dense in sugars and starches. This will then limit tooth decay (among a host of other health claims which I'm not focusing on). Look forward to your comments. Thanks
Respectfully, Christopher Lupo

Medium avatar
0
598 · May 03, 2014 at 3:06 PM

While I can't explain the nuances of plaque, I think this is a good example of taking "is this paleo" too far. One guy posted on here that he doesn't shower anymore because it's not paleo... No I try not to overuse soaps and unnatural substances but I get wet and freshen up every day.

Eating a clean paleo diet makes brushing after every meal unnecessary. There's nothing wrong with brushing and flossing once or twice a day though.

The other thing is environmental and developmental. My girlfriend, for instance, ate a fairly traditional diet in her youth (filipino) and her teeth are AMAZING. Just saying, if anyone could get away without brushing it'd be folks like her. My teeth, on the other hand, are prone to getting things stuck between them and my enamel isn't the strongest. I definitely need to brush.

Also, your breath stinks. Go brush your teeth!

Aa09b54a9f5334c420b1ff7d86b724da
0 · May 03, 2014 at 3:22 PM

lol. it was just a thought.

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