9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad
5

What's a GOOD TSH level?

by (56596)
Updated September 16, 2014 at 7:14 PM
Created August 10, 2010 at 6:49 PM

I got my thyroid stim hormone test and it was 1.94. It said low is .34 and high is 5.60. So mine is in the middle on the low end. I'd be curious to know if it's a good value though. Have you gotten yours tested?

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6
2437 · August 27, 2011 at 1:26 AM

@Ruth, autoimmune Paleo also drops dairy, eggs and nightshades. If you scroll down on this link there is a section titled "Autoimmunity." Note the things he lists besides the eggs are to the best of my knowledge all nightshades. http://robbwolf.com/faq/#basics

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd
2178 · August 26, 2011 at 7:14 PM

what's the difference between autoimmune paleo & regular paleo?

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930
5232 · August 26, 2011 at 2:43 AM

There's some argument out there about how low TSH should be. Some people think it should be below one (Jaminet) other think that anything under 1 indicates pituitary disfunction. TSH should be higher in men than in women.

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca
1453 · August 14, 2010 at 5:31 PM

Yeah, mine tends to be about .3 to .6 ... and my T3 and T4 are on the low end of the range, though I feel OK. But my understanding also is that taking supplemental T3 as well as T4 tends to suppress TSH. My not-very-progressive endocrinologist doesn't want my TSH suppressed, tells me about the dangerous things that will happen if it is, though my understanding is that's largely BS if T4/T3 aren't high.

Bbb993c8dacf76dd461703a82686c06a
135 · August 12, 2010 at 3:08 AM

I have been at 2.6-2.7 for years and have felt terrible with hypo symptoms. My meds were adjusted recently and I feel terrific at a TSH of 0.86.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34
3703 · August 11, 2010 at 6:59 PM

Thanks Chris, YOU ARE A ROCKSTAR! Actually I don't even like the TSH test... for a great % of the population it doesn't measure a thing, it's like ck'ing the windshield wiper fluid container to see if the car is gassed up. The HPT axis (hypothalamus pituitary thyroid) can be j*cked and develop thyroid-hormone resistance where low systemic thyroid messages don't get through to trigger a an appropriate TSH spike.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321
1973 · August 11, 2010 at 4:23 PM

The HUNT study suggests a TSH above 1.4 is where things turn sour. http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/168/8/855

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca
1453 · August 11, 2010 at 1:37 AM

5.5 is an outdated upper end for the range that unfortunately many labs still use. The new official upper end is 3.0. My understanding is that anything above 2.0 can indicate problems. Often lower is better.

Total Views
42.9K

Recent Activity
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

Last Activity
29D AGO

Followers
0

Get Free Paleo Recipes Instantly

9 Answers

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34
4
3703 · August 11, 2010 at 3:22 AM

Prairie Prof is correct. The Am Ac of Clinical Endocrinologists in the latest guideline advise < 3.0 TSH if on medications. They are hemming-hawing regarding 'sublinical' hypothyroidism when > 3.0 and 'asymptomatic'. The problem with low thyroid is that everyone is uniquely different in their thyroid function and presentation, depending on various factors (soya and goitrogen toxicity, pollutants, heavy metal burden, auto-antibodies, apo E status w/E4 naturally lower which are Northern Europeans, hormone and vitamin D status, etc).

The Cleveland Clinic is way more advanced and advises TSH < 2.0 and the free T4 at the upper 1/3 of normal range ~1.5 to 1.8.

Thyroid like other glands (adrenals, ovaries, testicles) requires a lot of nutrients and minerals for optimal functioning and a stress-free environment.

--low mental/physical stress, low cortisol (but not depleted cortisol)

--optimal estrogen, T, progesterone, vitamin D, omega-3, low low omega-6 (omega-6 SHUTS THYROID OFF -- read Stephan Whole Health Source)

--zinc iodine mag chromium trace (manganese molyb etc)

--B-vitamins

--tyrosine (precursor to T3) found in red meat

--vitamin K2 and fermented food products

--gluten free, low insulin, etc to improve and eradicate auto-antibodies

Chris Kresser at Healthy Skeptic has an awesome series! [THANKS JAE -- Kresser is stellar]

-G

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34
3703 · August 11, 2010 at 6:59 PM

Thanks Chris, YOU ARE A ROCKSTAR! Actually I don't even like the TSH test... for a great % of the population it doesn't measure a thing, it's like ck'ing the windshield wiper fluid container to see if the car is gassed up. The HPT axis (hypothalamus pituitary thyroid) can be j*cked and develop thyroid-hormone resistance where low systemic thyroid messages don't get through to trigger a an appropriate TSH spike.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321
1973 · August 11, 2010 at 4:23 PM

The HUNT study suggests a TSH above 1.4 is where things turn sour. http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/168/8/855

Dccb54c73ff9cfefafdd8a0631b4c994
0
0 · April 19, 2013 at 12:05 AM

It seems that in 2012 the AACE taskforce took a step backwards and is now saying that overt hypothyroidism is anything with a TSH level above 10 and below 10 (upper range I am assuming) could be possibly subclinical hypothyroidism if symptoms are present. So instead of moving the range down, they are now moving it up, citing that too many patient's are drug-seeking a hypothyroidism diagnosis for an obesity fix. Personally this is very frustrating to me. I am an HMO patient who has had hypothyroidism for over 10 years. Over the last year I have gone from a size 6 to a size 14, gaining 50 pounds. I am an avid exercising and healthy eater. My TSH was 0.96 at my normal size 6 self. I felt well and had been on the same dose of Levothyroxine for years. On my yearly recheck (after gaining the weight), it was then 3.9. My doc said it was normal and didn't change med. Three months later I asked him to retest, as I had now tried both Nutrisystem and Seattle Sutton with no weight loss success. This time my level came back at 9.8. He increased my med dose, and on retesting now, it is 4.9. He is happy with that and doesn't want to change my med dose any further, and doesn't even want to give me a referral to an endocrinologist. All I can say is that my personal experience is that I felt terrific when my TSH level was below 1, energetic, mentally clear, with a healthy physically fit body, and now I feel terrible and it makes me wonder if primary care physicians really know much about thyroid health at all.

4bd4e2fe6a095663f80c69656936e487
0
744 · January 16, 2013 at 5:46 PM

Ray Peat, a thyroid specialist, mentioned that he never saw a comfortably healthy person with TSH above 2, and recommends having it below 0.4. One way to improve thyroid function is eliminating all significant sources of polyunsaturated fats from the diet.

D8b76b1911fc8334369a42ab739bc8f7
0
0 · January 16, 2013 at 1:25 PM

I have been a thyroid patient for the past 11 years. When originally diagnosed and put on meds I lost a good amount of weight (along with diet and exercise). Now after 2 kids I can not lose weight at all. I had my TSH tested last week - came back at 1.8. Doc bumped my synthroid just a tad to see if that would help me. Its so frustrating - I eat clean and exercise and the scale doesn't budge.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6
0
2437 · August 26, 2011 at 2:39 AM

My TSH level is 2.5. I have the symptoms of low energy and need a lot of sleep but have super strong nails,hair and good tone to my skin. Should I still suspect hypothyroidism/hashimotos? I do MUCH better on autoimmune paleo vs reg paleo. I just chalked the difference up to less inflammation. (eggs & nightshades cause me to have stiff joints. Dairy is lrg amounts = sinus issues)

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6
2437 · August 27, 2011 at 1:26 AM

@Ruth, autoimmune Paleo also drops dairy, eggs and nightshades. If you scroll down on this link there is a section titled "Autoimmunity." Note the things he lists besides the eggs are to the best of my knowledge all nightshades. http://robbwolf.com/faq/#basics

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd
2178 · August 26, 2011 at 7:14 PM

what's the difference between autoimmune paleo & regular paleo?

25f4a87a6792e7ba6de2525a121fffa8
0
0 · August 14, 2010 at 2:13 PM

Dr. Datis Kharrazian uses a functional, i.e. healthy, range of 1.8 to 3.0 for TSH. He wrote an excellent book called Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms. Although he doesn't recommend a Paleo diet, he recommends low-carb and is very critical of the high-carb SAD. I don't agree that lower TSH is always better; a TSH level that's too low indicates the pituitary is not communicating with the thyroid, and for obvious reasons that's not a good thing.

9dce97b4c4762a78a577a11585eef8f2
0
1229 · August 11, 2010 at 5:45 AM

I have been seeing a naturopath, and she tells me that, in her experience, the healthiest people have TSH levels <2. I have been diagnosed as hypothyroid with levels varying between 2.6 and 3.5.

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca
1453 · August 14, 2010 at 5:31 PM

Yeah, mine tends to be about .3 to .6 ... and my T3 and T4 are on the low end of the range, though I feel OK. But my understanding also is that taking supplemental T3 as well as T4 tends to suppress TSH. My not-very-progressive endocrinologist doesn't want my TSH suppressed, tells me about the dangerous things that will happen if it is, though my understanding is that's largely BS if T4/T3 aren't high.

Bbb993c8dacf76dd461703a82686c06a
135 · August 12, 2010 at 3:08 AM

I have been at 2.6-2.7 for years and have felt terrible with hypo symptoms. My meds were adjusted recently and I feel terrific at a TSH of 0.86.

85026a0abe715229761956fbbee1cba0
0
78417 · August 11, 2010 at 5:44 AM

My thyroid test usually comes in just under 2 somewhere and I feel reasonably good at that level. At under 1 the doctor gets in a flap and wants to cut my meds back so I guess he is using the old range. I read an article that stated keeping the level under 2 is best to avoid alzheimers, which is in my family history.

I also believe that eating soy is bad for me, as is using toothpaste containing flouride. It is up to the thyroid patient to be aware of things like that because most doctors either aren't aware of the facts or don't share them with their patients.

Despite having classic hypothyroid symptoms I went undiagnosed for years, and was tested for everything else first.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64
0
11478 · August 10, 2010 at 7:03 PM

Mine is usually around 2. I don't get additional labwork, because I don't have any symptoms suggesting hypothyroidism. Some bloggers, such as Nikoley at FTA, suggest that it's better if your TSH is at the lower end of normal. TSH is a screening test for healthy, asymptomatic people. If you're having symptoms of hypothyroidism ( http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/DS00353/DSECTION=symptoms ), then further labwork such as free T4 and free T3 are indicated.

Answer Question

Login to Your PaleoHacks Account